Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 29

Thread: Re: Canning (What about tomatoes?)

  1. #1
    Keepin' it real gsk8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    2,476

    Question Re: Canning (What about tomatoes?)

    Can I use the jars I saved for the green beans to make pasta sauce from the tomatoes I'm growing instead?

  2. #2
    Da' Spellin' Homegirl Grgranny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    2,144
    I don't see any reason why not as long as they are sterilized. I reuse jars all the time. If they are for canning anything they have to be sterilized but if it's just for a week or so, regular washing will do. I don't know anything about canning pasta sauce but it's easy to get recipes on the internet. You do have to have some kind of sealing tops if it's for canning. For jelly and the like a lot of people just pour paraffin on the top of the jelly. Just make sure there are no chips on the rims.

  3. #3
    On Edge Piel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bayfield, WI
    Posts
    3,973
    Paula, although tomatoes are more acidic than grren bean you would still need to use sterile jars with rings in good condition and new seals. They can be canned without a pressure canner using a large stock or canning pot that will hold a rack. As for pasta sauce, you can prepare and can it but IMO it is better to can the tomatoes by themselves and then use as you would canned ones from the store preparing your pasta sauce fresh when needed. Tomatoes can also be frozen as can the pasta sauce. You can also cook the tomatoes down before canning and can them as tomatoe sauce, past, or even catsup. Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Custom Title Pookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    571
    As far as I know, the same thing would apply to the tomatoes. Any garden items you put in jars to preserve for later needs to be canned in a boiling water bath (which takes quite a while) or canned in a pressure cooker with new seals and jar lids. I'm not sure seals and jar lids will fit pasta jars.

    It's been a few years since I've done it but tomatoes that don't seal are not pleasant when you open them after a while.
    Last edited by Pookie; 06-30-2004 at 02:51 PM.

  5. #5
    Figure Skating Is A Dangerous Sport Dee4707's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    16,651
    Ah-h-h-h-h canning. That takes me back many years when mom used to can all kinds of stuff in the summer. I hated it because she used to make my brother and me pit the cherries for canning. I think I ate as many as I pitted I used to run away and hide from her when I knew she was going to be canning again. :D

    Dee

  6. #6
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    625
    OK Tomatoes I know about. I do them every year because I can't stand the thought of store bought canned tomatoes. Tomatoes are one of the easiest to do. They are messy but not hard. Yes, you can use the jars you saved assuming there are no chips or flaws on the surface edges and they take the standard sized lids and rings available.

    I also agree that you may want to do tomatoes rather than pasta sauce. Then you can use the tomatoes for everything from Macaroni and tomatoes, to goulash, to lasagne, to spaghetti, to soup. Great things tomatoes.

    If you decide to do the sauce, one of the things that makes it easy is that you thoroughly cook the sauce before canning. If you seal your jars well, it should last indefinitely. As in all things, you use common sense. If it looks bad and smells bad, you throw it out.

    I also do chilli sauce every year - great for salad dressing and better than ketchup on a hamburger.
    Last edited by A.H.Black; 06-30-2004 at 03:37 PM.

  7. #7
    Wicked Yankee Girl dorispulaski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Staring at the ocean and smiling.
    Posts
    15,119
    Tomatoes freeze very well. Just wash out milk cartons thoroughly and pour the hot tomatoes in and freeze.

    If you have green tomatoes at the end of the season, green tomato mincemeat is good, and can also be frozen instead of canned.

    I am always edgy about canning anything other than jam or jelly. Just about when I get up the nerve to try, someone will get botulism who has been canning for 20 years, and I go back to freezing stuff again.

    Doris

  8. #8
    Da' Spellin' Homegirl Grgranny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    2,144
    Sure glad for all that posted here. I don't know that much about canning tomatoes. I don't think my mother canned tomatoes much. I would remember since we 2 girls had to do all the work.
    Just a little aside. One of the things I liked best was chokecherry jelly. The sandhills were on the north & west side of town and we lived on the east. She would take us and put us kids in a blow out to play in the sand while she picked chokecherries. I know it's not grammatically correct but I'm too lazy to correct it.

  9. #9
    On Edge Piel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bayfield, WI
    Posts
    3,973

    Question

    Grgranny what are chokecherries and what is a blowout?

    Patti

  10. #10
    Da' Spellin' Homegirl Grgranny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    2,144
    Chokecherries are some kind of little berries that grow on low bushes in the sandhills. Kind of like cherries. It's so long since I saw them I can't even remember what they look like.
    Blowouts are sandhills that the wind has blown the center out of. (More bad grammar). Usually one side has pretty much disappeared and you have a hollow hill on 3 sides. I wonder if there's a site for blowouts? You wouldn't catch me there now. Lots of snakes. ugh :(

  11. #11
    Da' Spellin' Homegirl Grgranny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    2,144
    Use canning salt and not table salt when canning.

  12. #12
    On Edge Piel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bayfield, WI
    Posts
    3,973

    Chokecherries

    I found some information about chokecherries. The two article are conflicting in that one says the pits are harmful to eat while the other says they are edible?

    http://www.homefamily.net/foodnutrit...echerries.html

    http://food.oregonstate.edu/p/chokecherries.html

  13. #13
    In love with the axel!
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Detroit Michigan
    Posts
    413
    I've been canning for many years now, mostly tomatoes, pickles and jam. Personally, I wouldn't use anything but canning jars made for that purpose. Canning takes a lot of time and effort, and to have your product go bad because you used the wrong jars would be a real bummer.

    I make tomato sauce and can it - if you decide to do that, be prepared for a really long, hot day. I usually start in the morning (around 9) and finish around 11 at night. That's because you have all the prep time, the simmering, then the water bath. But it sure is worth it when you open the jar in February! Commercial sauce can't touch it.

    One thing that is really easy to do, and I recommend, is to can a quart or two of whole or stewed tomatoes each night. That way it is manageable, and uses your tomatoes at their peak. When I do whole (peeled) or stewed, I include a tablespoon of bottled lemon juice and a teaspoon of kosher salt in each quart. Doesn't effect the taste, and helps with the preservation. (BTW, we usually have about 25 plants, so I have a lot of opportunities to can :D .)

    Good luck with your canning. I have found it to be highly rewarding (and I never thought I'd be the type to can). There's a book out there that I got a few years ago called "American Country Living Canning and Preserving" by Linda Ferrari. Don't know if it's still available, but it has a lot of good technical tips plus good recipies.
    Last edited by sk8er1964; 07-01-2004 at 10:02 PM. Reason: To add my # of tomato plants

  14. #14
    On Edge Piel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bayfield, WI
    Posts
    3,973
    1964, what kind of tomatoes do you grow?

  15. #15
    In love with the axel!
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Detroit Michigan
    Posts
    413
    Mostly Rutgers, for the canning. We do some Early Girl and Beefsteak for eating. I did successfully use Beefsteak for sauces, but had problems with them for stewed/whole (not enough juice).

    Edited to add that the beefsteak/meatier versions are better for salsa - the Rutgers seem to have a bit too much juice for that. I do combat that by adding a can of tomato paste, but it's better to have the meatier tomatoes for salsa, IMO.
    Last edited by sk8er1964; 07-01-2004 at 10:46 PM.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. green beans canning
    By New canner in forum 2005-06 Figure Skating archives
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-07-2005, 09:12 AM
  2. Canning Green Beans
    By gsk8 in forum 2005-06 Figure Skating archives
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 09-06-2005, 12:02 PM
  3. Taxes: Opening myself up to eggs, tomatoes, and who knows what else...
    By Doggygirl in forum 2004-05 Figure Skating archives
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 11-23-2004, 04:45 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •