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Thread: Chris Bowman arrested in gun incident

  1. #16
    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    Jessilly - Not that I don't believe you, but I just want to ascertain that you are in a position to say there are good opportunities to coach figure skating.?

    Would you see Jenny Kirk making 100,000 dollars a year coaching? What if she doesn't like to coach? What else is there? Will she sell tickets to SOI beyond the first season? Will she take a crash course in designing skating frocks? I believe skaters can make their own decisions on what to do in life. Unfortunately, Chris Bowman made some dumb ones.

    Joe

  2. #17
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    Joesitz - I guess you are a kind of not believing me. But I know quite a few coaches locally and I see them all the time. You can make a good living if you work hard, you have a few years experience, and you have a some relatively good competitive records.

    I am not convicing Jenny Kirk, or Christopher Bowman or anyone who has skating background go into coaching unless you really put your heart on it. Jenny may want to coach, may not, I don't know. She is a smart young lady from a well educated family, she has many options to pursue her professional career. As for CB, it seems that he has been teaching for a while, if he has learned a lesson after all these years, if no other job options, he can certainly make a good living from coaching.

  3. #18
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    Joesitz:
    Jess is right that a coach can make $100G a year. Forget a coach with CB's credentials (Nat titles, Olympics, World Medals), a coach who has achieved the senior level in moves and freestyle can make an excellent living b/c there are very few skaters overall who actually make it to these levels. Most coaches teach having achieved senior moves and perhaps novice freestyle and some dance (they also make good money). Plus coaching is a business like everything else. A coach who establishes a good rapport with her/his students and the kids are progressing will be in demand and make lots of money. There's a girl at my rink who is always booked with students (she coached me a bit in group lessons as well) and she is not a big name, yet her students progress well and she is a pleasant person to work with.

    There is money to be made in elite skating, but a vast majority of the kids who take lessons are not talented and are doing so purely for fun or to participate in synchro. For these kids, it's really important to have a coach who makes skating fun and helps the kids to progress. The fun coaches (ie cheerleader types) are always in demand and are handsomely paid.

  4. #19
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    Jess and Soogar - What I am complaining about is the phrase "He/she should go pro" which to me is a bash of the skater. The poster obviously never cared for the skater or has recently gotten tired of the skater. The poster never mentions what that skater would do as a pro? and even the responses in this thread did not really say that there are many openings for coaches except it's easy to get a job coaching. That is what I read, and I don't believe it. Of couse, one has to work hard in a business but one has to start of business first. Not that easy. Eventually some of skaters with degrees will go out and work at what their degree was for. I can see some of them coaching part time if they get the opportunity but full time? - no way.

    I would like the phrase to be banned. The skaters know when to 'go pro' which can mean just plain quitting or getting in the chorus of Snow White. Leave it to the skaters to decide.

    Joe

  5. #20
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    I don't think that getting a full time coaching job and staying in it is any particular harder than other professions in this society.
    Major clubs have some certain standards, such as gold in moves and Junior in freestyle, as requirement to be able to teach there, similar to college degree to work in a company. Once you get the feet at the door, it's all depend on your ability to grab the opportunity.
    I see coaches who have a few years experience work hard and are successful here, and I also see a young lady determined to make her coaching career work and succeed. I also see hard working coaches who speak limited English make great success at teaching too.
    New collage graduades don't make 70K right away, same thing in the coaching business. Once you learn how to handle things, it's can make a good life out of it.

  6. #21
    Resident Kristi Fan purplecat's Avatar
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    Very sad! Chris is still one of my all-time favorite skaters and it's just such a shame.
    Last edited by purplecat; 11-02-2004 at 01:03 AM.

  7. #22
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    Where are you guys?

    Guffaw Guffaw....I don't know where you all live, but in California, even a kid freshly passing Sr. moves and with a friend in the right rink can get set up into a $50,000 to $100,000 /year situation, and for sure doesn't have to work as hard at it as, say, a first year public school teacher ( who, by the way, doesn't come close to those figures until retirement 30 years later).

    Chris did coach. I ran into him in Acton Mass at the Olympia once, and he had one private student from GA at the time (2-3 lessons daily, 5 days a week), who probably paid him in the $50,000/year neighborhood alone....

    Otherwise, I don't know what to think of the story. I, too, thought he'd put his life on the straight and narrow with his wife and baby and a decent job commentating for ESPN. I'm disappointed, but not shocked. I've never understood it when people respond to great talent or opportunity or great good fortune by destroying themselves. Personally, I keep trying to convince God that I would make a FABULOUSLY responsible and worthy million-dollar lotto winner. I promised to not run out and drown myself with drink and drugs if He dumps all that in my lap.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesslily
    I don't think that getting a full time coaching job and staying in it is any particular harder than other professions in this society.
    Major clubs have some certain standards, such as gold in moves and Junior in freestyle, as requirement to be able to teach there, similar to college degree to work in a company. Once you get the feet at the door, it's all depend on your ability to grab the opportunity.
    I see coaches who have a few years experience work hard and are successful here, and I also see a young lady determined to make her coaching career work and succeed. I also see hard working coaches who speak limited English make great success at teaching too.
    New collage graduades don't make 70K right away, same thing in the coaching business. Once you learn how to handle things, it's can make a good life out of it.
    There are thousands of competitive skaters. Citing the success of one of them does not apply to all of them.

    1. What clubs now are looking for coaches?
    2. How does a 'new coach' get started before he has his few years experience?
    3.. Must a skater come to the US to make big bucks?
    4. New college grads do not make $70k right away, but their chance of being hired is greater than a coach looking for a position.even in a recession.

    I'm not against a skater whose retiring to consider coaching. I should hope he is planning his future. What I am objecting to is posters suggesting that they 'go pro' before they want to without knowing the market. What is the real sreason for the use of that term 'go pro'?

    Joe

  9. #24
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    I do not encourage all senior skaters go to coaching business. If you have a college degree, it's better to find jobs outside of skating world.
    If you want to coach, you don't have to turn pro right away. Some people compete while coaching. If you are with a elite coach for a while, I'm sure he/she has some biginners let you teach. And many skaters start at teaching group lessons to get basic experience.
    To teach at a major club, you have to send in the papers to the board. As long as you have every thing, it shouldn't a problem to teach there.
    At local smaller club, you just simply talk to the director of skating program or the rink owner.
    I don't know coaching in Europe. But it said the Canadian coaches are paid less than USA.
    Certainly there are better market in USA and so many coaches from Russia came here teaching. You see they drive fancy cars...

  10. #25
    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    That;s it Jess. Let the skater decide whent to retire and let us hope he has thought it out what he can do in retirement. He may go to medical school as some have, and at least one of them became a skating judge. Nice to keep up with the sport. There are things out there for the skaters and they know it, and when to go after it.

    Obisously, Chris did not like coaching, commentating, figure skating. Sad!

    Joe

  11. #26
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    Basically coaching as a job is not any harder than other jobs to land, and is not any harder than other jobs to keep. It's all depend on how much effort you put in. There is no easy job in this world.

  12. #27
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    Jess - Just when I think you understand the gist of what is bugging me in this thread, you come back with another point on coaching. :sheesh:

    Jess, fyi, I used to figure skate. I know coaches. I know they make a living. I know some who eke out a living. Can we agree on this topic of coaching? I have nothing in oppositiion to what you are saying. Our only difference in this subject is that I don't believe there are that many vacancies for coaching. With so many ex-skaters those vacancies fill up very quickly and the ones who did not get the coaching jobs have to think of other means of retirement. Over and Out!

    Now since we are not at odds on Coaching. Praise to be! Could you please respond to my pet peeve that the phrase 'go pro' is basically a poster saying to a skater that the skater is all washed up, taking up space for a younger skater, not to my liking, failing to improve over the years, never gets on the podium, or any other negative points of view of the skater, And the phrase 'go pro' is never really defined at what area of 'pro' the skater should go to. It is just to wipe the skater out of sight. I have never read that a skater should join SOI like SOI is just waiting to get him/her (Unless he/she is a definite money maker.) The jobs at SOI are very limited. Am I correct?

    In fact, when a poster uses the term 'go pro', it is a euphenism(sp) for 'I want you out of here.'

    Joe

  13. #28
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    SOC is really for skaters who have major titles and for someone who helps the company making money. SImilar in academic world, not every college grad can find jjob matching he dreams and what he has learned. About 40% of college grads can not find the right jobs after graduation. Probablly just very few business major grads can find jobs at NY Stock Exchange, entry level jobs running statistics report...
    How each skater did from prelimitary to Senior level is decided by many factors. After skating is done, what you want to do is very individual. I doubt some skaters that naive and not consider other career options if skating does not provide enough living resources.
    At any club, there are many parents who are willing to pay coach at least one lesson a day, 5 days a week to teach their kids, some of them are willing to pay 2 or 3 lessons a day to a coach. Sure they really want to have a coach who love their kids, no eating and drinking, no routinely 5 or 8 minutes late, no chatting with other kids while coaching the kid who pays

  14. #29
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    Joe - please understand that I am not talking to any individual particularly at this forum.

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