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Thread: Search for the perfect boot

  1. #1
    Tripping on the Podium
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    Search for the perfect boot

    I'm looking for some advice on how to choose a company for making custom boots. After years of being unsatisfied with stock boots, I'm considering getting custom boots made. My problem is deciding who to make them for me... I mean, if they make them custom to your feet, they should all fit well, right?

  2. #2
    Tripping on the Podium
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    Have you had a good experience with a stock boot? I would go with that company (if they do custom boots). I think your choices for custom boots are Klingbeil, SP-Teri, Harlick, GAM, or Riedell. Jackson offers changes to their stock boots for an additional fee. Also, custom means different things. Do they take a mold of your foot? Do you get to add features to your boot like a double flex notch, pink suede, and extra stiffness? How long will it take to get them made (4 weeks or 12 weeks)? All of the boot manufacturers can be found on the web and have info on their customs.

  3. #3
    Custom Title dwiggin3's Avatar
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    When I first started skating, I had horrible problems with the stock boots that were available to me. So, I saved up my paper route money and purchased Klingbeils. They worked great...a bit heavy though.

    Now its many, many, many years later and I've decided to start skating again. I still have my Klingbeils (a differnt pair that I only skated in for 2 years). If I could afford them again, I would look into it however, unlike you, I'm looking for a good pair of stock boots that will fit right.

    I think that because I was living in AK when I purchased my Klingbeil's, the selection of stock boots was much more limited than in the lower 48. That combined with the advances in technology, have me praying that I can find a good stock boot that fits well but is stiff enough in the ankle and doesn't rub on my achilles tendon. I like that U-shape that is inspired by the dance boots that is being incorporated into the Freeskate boots.

    I'd try stock boots first...if they are not working, Klingbeils are worth the money and wait!...And they're friendly.

    Good luck
    Darby

  4. #4
    Tripping on the Podium
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    Everyone seems so happy with their Klingbeils... is there anyone that has had a bad experience? Seems hard to argue with 100% positive feedback! Every other manufacturer has their rave reviews, but also their share of negative feedback.

    I'm currently in Grafs and they are as close as I've come to being happy with my boots. If only they did customs! Harlick would be my second favourite, the only drawback to them is weight. Combine the lightness of Grafs and the strength of Harlick and I'd be good to go!

    Darby, if you don't want a boot that digs into your achillies, stay away from the Graf Edmonton Special, and probably the Richmond too. I have lumps on my achillies from my first pair of Edmontons. I'm on my second pair and had a boot technician cut down the back and flare it out, so now they're perfect! No more painful lumps. If you have someone who can modify your boots, then don't rule out the Graf Edmonton's, otherwise, I don't think you'd be happy with the achillies pressure.

  5. #5
    Rinkside
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    I’ve been reading this and other threads on the search for the “perfect boot” with great interest, as I recently decided to try stepping onto the ice again. Having not been on the ice for many years (15!) and now being quite a bit larger then when I was seven or eight; I was surprised to find that there aren’t many choices for us larger individuals. Normally in North American sizes, I have to buy either a size 13.5 or 14 shoe/boot, I’ve even splurged and gone with customs that I use when I sing, because it’s very difficult to find nice supportive dress shoes in those sizes in most cities. Also because, I’m a larger individual; for skating purposes anyhow; I would assume that I might need a stiffer boot that my skill level would suggest.

    When I stopped by my local boutique they told me to go with customs. Great, I thought, I just want to do some simple recreational skating (figures, moves in the field, ect, no multi rotational jumping or spins) and they tell me to go out and by a custom boot.

    Are customs the only options for those of us with larger feet?

  6. #6
    Custom Title
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    H-
    I'm not sure if you're a guy or a girl but have you looked into getting a higher model stock boot in your size. If you're a big person who weighs over 150 pounds, you can probably break down a high end stock boot (like an SP Teri Advantage) in no time at all. Also it kind of looks like "stock" boots are kind of custom made since with the SP's, you can mix widths and it takes a few weeks to get them. Though I empathize with you that it's a lot of money for a beginner skate.

    How about hockey skates? Hockey skates are more comfortable and if you just want to work on moves, they would do the trick.

  7. #7
    Rinkside
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    Quote Originally Posted by soogar
    H-
    How about hockey skates? Hockey skates are more comfortable and if you just want to work on moves, they would do the trick.
    Hockey skates are also harder (but not impossible) to find in those sizes and I have to admit I have never found them comfortable, the last time I was in pair, I wanted to cut my feet off. My memories of “real” skates are somewhat more pleasant, after the first few weeks at any rate.

    Pivots and some steps would be a little tricky on hockey skates, and I don't think you can get the same control for patch skating, but I might be wrong. Besides, they just don't look as good.

    Thanks for the info regarding weight, being comfortably over 150lbs, and just over six foot tall, I guess support and strength would be essential qualities. That was one reason the kind lady at the store suggested customs as they can really make those things quite stiff and strong.

  8. #8
    Tripping on the Podium
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    The problem with larger stock boots (in the 13-14 range) is that they are not going to be as stiff as you need them. The bigger the boot, the less support you get because there is more leather. Take a short piece of leather and it doesn't bend that much. Take long piece of leather and it will bend more. Think of plywood -- you take a small piece and it's stiff, you look at a sheet and it can bend in the middle, not a lot but it does. Boots for folks with big feet who require a lot of support are just not going to be stock boots. They would need individual custom attention so that they are built with extra support according to the skater's needs.

  9. #9
    Tripping on the Podium
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    I wonder if anyone uses Edea boots? Are they better than risport?

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