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Thread: How much more difficult is the 'Tano lutz than a regular lutz?

  1. #31
    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    It's tough. That is true, and I hope we are not accepting 2 arms above the head in a 'hands up' police action. the arms should either be in the balletic first position or in a character pose. Not easy.

    Joe

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joesitz
    It's tough. That is true, and I hope we are not accepting 2 arms above the head in a 'hands up' police action. the arms should either be in the balletic first position or in a character pose. Not easy.

    Joe
    I know Brian's two-arms-up double loop wasn't in a 'hands up' position -- I'll have to check out the tape to find out exactly what the two arms were doing, however.

    And by the way, Brian first did a Tano triple lutz at 1981 (or maybe 82, I'll have to check) Skate Canada. He did it in the short program with a double toe on the end as his combination. However, he had a scratchy (perhaps slightly two-footed?) landing on the lutz and decided to stop working on it then. From what I've heard, Linda Leaver suggested he put it in his 1986-87 long program as a way to increase difficulty and include something unique. He did it in the 1986-87 year and 1987-88 year, but I think only in his long programs, not in exhibitions, etc., because it was hard. After he turned pro, he did both kinds of lutzes for a while, then added the spread eagle entry to the tano about a year or so after the Olympics and pretty much did only tanos after that -- except, as heyang said in an earlier post, he did do one pro comp (Skatesx2) in which he did a tano lutz in the first program fine, then decided to put a lutz in his second program, too, but do it in the "regular" position. He had trouble on the landing -- I believe he two-footed it -- and said after that he'd done the tano position for so long that his timing was off for the regular kind.

    Like Joe, I think it DOES add difficulty to do different arm positions or unique entries, etc., to jumps and spins. But if you practice anything a lot, it will get "easier" FOR YOU. Ryan J. has practiced the tano a lot (and he surely does beautiful ones most of the time), so it might be "easier" FOR HIM now to do it that way, but it doesn't mean the jump is easy. Quads seem to be "easy" for Plushenko, too, but I wouldn't say the jump is easy, only that he's worked hard enough at it to make it, if not easy, then at least consistent.

    I remember watching a Four Continents competition a few years back and after seeing so many of the men competitors have trouble with a spread eagle, I came to the conclusion that, while for the likes of Brian B., Paul Wylie, etc., that move may be "easy," it isn't necessarily an easy move!

  3. #33
    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    I've notice Ryan doing the 'tano'. When he is on, he has a nice ballet-like quality.

    Joe

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