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Thread: Blades on Ice - All About Pairs

  1. #31
    Forum translator Ptichka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by purplecat
    You know what they say - "Great minds think alike!"
    Always amused me that the Russian version of this proverb says "Idiots think alike". Now, what does it say about the difference betwen Russian and American cultures?

  2. #32
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
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    Horray for Golden Skate. Where else can you learn things like that every day?

  3. #33
    SkateFan4Life
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joesitz
    I highly recommend fans to get this latest issue of Blades. It is a well written history of Pairs in ice skating. There may be some flaws in the stories and maybe somewhat biased in some opinions but overall it will give the newly addicted members to figure skating something to go on and remind more active fans that there was brilliant skating in years gone by.

    Joe
    Absolutely, Joe! I am a charter subscriber to "Blades on Ice", and I greatly enjoyed the wonderful, extensive article on pairs skating. I'm old enough to remember quite a few of the pairs, starting from the legandary Protopopovs. I had the privilege of seeing Ludmilla and Oleg compete at the World Pro Championships, and, WOW, were they ever fantastic. They won the event by a huge margin, and the fans were on their feet cheering their lungs out. Truly, they were the royal pair of pairs skating - at least for their era, if not for all time.

    Other wonderful pairs included Wagner/Paul, the Kauffmann brother/sister pair,
    Kitty and Peter Carruthers, the brilliant Gordeeva/Grinkov, and so on. The list goes on and on!

    I can't wait to see the pairs competing at the Olympics next year! Hopefully, there won't be a controversy (of any kind) to diminish the beauty of this aspect of figure skating.

    All the best to all the pairs! Go for it.

  4. #34
    Resident Kristi Fan purplecat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptichka
    Always amused me that the Russian version of this proverb says "Idiots think alike". Now, what does it say about the difference betwen Russian and American cultures?
    How interesting! And unfortunately very often true (that idiots think alike)!
    Last edited by purplecat; 07-30-2005 at 11:21 PM.

  5. #35
    Matt Savoie~Soul Skater CzarinaAnya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by purplecat
    How interesting! And unfortunately very often true (that idiots think alike)!


    What are you trying to say, P.C.? :sheesh: jk...lol!
    Idiots may think alike, but we're obviously on the other end of that spectrum!

  6. #36
    ~ Figure Skating Is My Passion ~ Ladskater's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joesitz
    I highly recommend fans to get this latest issue of Blades. It is a well written history of Pairs in ice skating. There may be some flaws in the stories and maybe somewhat biased in some opinions but overall it will give the newly addicted members to figure skating something to go on and remind more active fans that there was brilliant skating in years gone by.

    Joe

    Yes, the history of pairs is well worth the read. The Pairs discipline has certainly gone through a lot of changes. Another book that discusses some great pair champions from Canada is : The Golden Age of Canadian Figure Skating by David Young. I read this book some time ago and thoroughly enjoyed it.

    The pair teams of today would learn a great deal if they studied some of the great pairs like the Protopovovs and Wagner and Paul. Their programs were simpler, but elegent and graceful. They looked like pair teams, instead of indvidual skaters disjointingly skating together.

  7. #37
    english heretic Kateri's Avatar
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    Potatoes

    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman
    Michelle has also said that she cut down the length of her spirals because, after you hold each edge for the required number of seconds (counting "one potato, two potato") you don't get any more points, so you have to rush on to the next element.
    Aaaaw.....now whenever I watch MK start into a gorgeous spiral, all that will come to mind is "she's counting potatoes in her head!" Kinda spoils the drama and emotion of the moment, ne?

    k.

  8. #38
    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkateFan4Life
    I can't wait to see the pairs competing at the Olympics next year! Hopefully, there won't be a controversy (of any kind) to diminish the beauty of this aspect of figure skating.
    Unfortunately, from what I've seen in Moscow Worlds, the Pairs of today are trying desperately to become Cirque du Soleil. It will be fight to see who has the most acrobatic lifts. But, there is one ray of hope in the German Pair. They actually have a rapport with each other. JMO.

    Joe

  9. #39
    SkateFan4Life
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladskater
    Yes, the history of pairs is well worth the read. The Pairs discipline has certainly gone through a lot of changes. Another book that discusses some great pair champions from Canada is : The Golden Age of Canadian Figure Skating by David Young. I read this book some time ago and thoroughly enjoyed it.

    The pair teams of today would learn a great deal if they studied some of the great pairs like the Protopovovs and Wagner and Paul. Their programs were simpler, but elegent and graceful. They looked like pair teams, instead of indvidual skaters disjointingly skating together.
    And that was one of the great things about Gordeeva and Grinkov. They were truly a meshed pair team, skated as a team, and looked beautiful together. Their love shone through in all of their performances.

  10. #40
    Custom Title Mathman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ptichka
    Obertas & Slavnov attended Moskvina's seminar, as distinct from a seminary, which is what the article claims they attended .
    But it's the next paragraph that is really funny. Tamara Moskvina says, about O & S,

    "When they asked me if I would teach them, I saw a very attractive, cute girl and a very mediocre village boy. So I told myself, I have to do something so that the difference between them isn't so big. What? Posture, moves -- some original, attractive elements that shift the attention away from him..."

  11. #41
    Custom Title Joesitz's Avatar
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    Katherine Hepburn on Astair and Rogers:

    She makes him look sexy and he gives her some class.

    I can't argue with that.

    Joe

  12. #42
    Resident Kristi Fan purplecat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CzarinaAnya


    What are you trying to say, P.C.? :sheesh: jk...lol!
    Idiots may think alike, but we're obviously on the other end of that spectrum!
    Of course, that goes without saying!

    Anyway, regarding the Blades on Ice article on pairs: I too enjoyed reading it, especially all the early pair information.

  13. #43
    Forum translator Ptichka's Avatar
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    Now that I've read the article carefully, some random points:

    1. Interesting that at 1908 Worlds 80% of judges were Russian. Despite this, Brits won wilver over Russians in a close decision.
    2. Interesting mention of early N. America vs. Europe difference in Owen's 1940 book: "Canadians [...] used specific dances as the theme and motif of their routines with jumps, lifts, and other moves subordinate to the rhythm.
    3. In 1935, Canadians Dafoe & Bowden did a reverse throw - has anyone else done it, if not then why, and why is it not used now?
    4. Interesting judging blocks: in 1964 Olympics Canada, Switzwerland, Czechoslovakia, and US put the Protopopovs first , while Germany, France, Italy, and Austria went for German Kilius & Baumler.
    5. Aren't the Protopopovs absolutely fantasitc for skating like that at 70 and 73?!!!
    6. I didn't like it that the article made it sound as if Rodnina and Zaitsev doing their short for the exhibitions was somehow cheating.
    7. "A fresh breeze came into pair skating when [...] Rodnina & Zaitsev [... took] the year off to have a baby". Hmmm... I can fully understand dislike of R&Z, but it seems absurd to blame sport stagnation on a strong skating team.
    8. In 1981, there were only 11 entries at Worlds in pairs. Nice to see the sport has been in this crisis before and clilmbed out of it.
    9. I don't like the suggestion that the stinginess of ISU caused the SLC scandal. Yes, it's true that with Abitbol & Bernadis out of the Games, LaGougne should not have been on this panel. However, the problems occured not because a judge was on the panel even though that country's skaters were not competing.

  14. #44
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    The reverse throw that Dafoe & Bowden did sounds very interesting.
    Does the offical rules say anything about doing a reverse throw? Maybe that is why pairs today don't do it.
    The throw also sounds difficult, so it is probably easier for pairs to practice & improve upon the traditional methods of throwing, rather than a new type of throw that the some of the judges may or may not like.
    All the same, I'm all for stretching the creative boundries of the sport-and it would be nice to see a pair do that move.

    Towards the end of the magazine, there is a lovely personal recollection of Irina Rodnina. I love the image of Rodnina rocking it out to an Elton John concert. It also gave me an appreciation for the obstacles that she overcame in her life.

    In addition to an historical overview-I think it would have been an interesting idea to interview as many living pairs skaters as possible, to get their opinion of the sport, their own careers and how they see pairs skating evolving over the years.

  15. #45
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    Ptichka, the North American version of that phrase actually has a second part, which is seldom used. The entire phrase is: Great minds think alike, but fools seldom differ.

    I liked the fact that Blades did such an in depth article. However, that being said, you can tell it is a North American magazine. This is shown not only in the critiques of skaters from the east, but also in which skaters got the small "highlight" parts. For example, when trying to highlight great pairs over the years, Urbanski and Marvel do not come to my mind. They were nice skaters, but never accomplished much at the world level.

    I have often thought that all of the skating magazines either need to hire copy editors, or to fire the ones they have. This article actually had fewer spelling and grammatical errors that most other articles I've read.

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