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Thread: Kurt Seyit and Sura

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by topaz emerald View Post
    In the series, Seyit betrays her. Is this true in real life?
    In a book review I read, the poster indicates that they did have a misunderstanding and he did cheat on her. I'll see if I can find link.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladyhawk View Post
    Perhaps what may have happened, if this is true, that Sura asked to see him again and he refused, it may have been that Seyit could not bear to see her again- it would reopen too many wounds. It would be to great a burden to bear. His memories would suffice. We sometimes beat ourselves up over the decisions we made, in this case Seyit married someone else and remained forever lost without his anchor/heart, but with his honor intact. He did his duty. Do not forget he was a trained soldier and his word meant everything. It was all he had left to remain an honorable man.
    Fractured as he was, he carried on, as the British say. Perhaps, to see his Twin Flame, would have shattered him to pieces. Fieldsofgreen, pls post that link here to the Russian site, I have many Russian friends who can translate for me
    I can totally relate to your own experience, as mine was similar.
    I can also relate to Seyit’s decision not to see Sura one last time.
    Once this break I am contemplating, to end a 48 year relationship, is completed. I can move on with my life, but
    I never wish to see him again. It would be extraordinarily painful.
    Best to move on.
    Yes, if you decide to end it and there are no kids in the picture, it's absolutely best to make a clean break. Otherwise it can be very difficult to move on. Never look back, as my mother always says...keep your eyes on the horizon.

    I'll see if I can find that link to the Russian site. I was hopping from site to site. I think Russian sites came up when I googled her full name instead of just Sura.

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    Quote Originally Posted by topaz emerald View Post
    By the way, this is my first time watching a Turkish series. And I must say they keep it pretty clean on the romance side, laughs.
    I noticed that too lol

    They also have some quirky editing at times. Weird close-ups, music abruptly coming in and cutting out from scene to scene etc and they don't seem to care too much about timelines/continuity

    Have you seen the last episode? The parade scene is supposed to be in 1928....5 yrs later...but the little boy Sabri hasn't aged a day. Then in the very next scene he's a young man.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fieldsofgreen View Post
    In a book review I read, the poster indicates that they did have a misunderstanding and he did cheat on her. I'll see if I can find link.
    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Fieldsofgreen View Post
    I noticed that too lol

    They also have some quirky editing at times. Weird close-ups, music abruptly coming in and cutting out from scene to scene etc and they don't seem to care too much about timelines/continuity

    Have you seen the last episode? The parade scene is supposed to be in 1928....5 yrs later...but the little boy Sabri hasn't aged a day. Then in the very next scene he's a young man.
    Laughs, you know that Turkish bath scene where she's bathing and he comes in? Well that scene would have been a smokescreen scene if it was made in America, laughs!
    No I didn't see the last episode. I'm still trying to catch up on episode 29....i stopped where he promised Valentina never to see her again at the hospital...been kinda busy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fati View Post
    Wasn't she 15 and he 24?
    That's what I thought too, but that picture of her grave stone says she was born in 1903. That would have made her 13 when they met in 1916. Unless she shaved a couple of years off her age when she immigrated and registered in the US, and just wrote down 1903.

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    Quote Originally Posted by topaz emerald View Post
    Thanks



    Laughs, you know that Turkish bath scene where she's bathing and he comes in? Well that scene would have been a smokescreen scene if it was made in America, laughs!
    No I didn't see the last episode. I'm still trying to catch up on episode 29....i stopped where he promised Valentina never to see her again at the hospital...been kinda busy
    Oh god, that was such a heartbreaking ep!!!!

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by topaz emerald View Post
    Thanks

    (
    here the link. Someone from the Netherlands commenting on the book https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1220807785

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    On youtube from the author:

    SHURA DID NOT GET MARRIED TO THE GUY WITH WHOM SHE LEFT ISTANBUL WITH. SHE BECAME A MODEL IN PRINCE FELIX YUSUPOV'S FASHION HOUSE IN PARIS AND SHE LEFT ALAIN NOT WANTING TO HAVE ANOTHER COMPLEX RELATIONSHIP. THEN SHE GETS MARRIED TO ANOTHER WHITE RUSSIAN GUY IN PARIS. BUT THIS IS NOT THE END OF STORY...

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    The episode I watched last night was when Seyit cheated on her with the one night stand...thinking she was with another man (who was really just a cousin). Yet Petro made him think that it was more. I skipped a bit on the next episode to see Seyit beating Petro up LOL! I have to say, I was cheering him on!

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    Quote Originally Posted by crowfamily View Post
    The episode I watched last night was when Seyit cheated on her with the one night stand...thinking she was with another man (who was really just a cousin). Yet Petro made him think that it was more. I skipped a bit on the next episode to see Seyit beating Petro up LOL! I have to say, I was cheering him on!
    I wanted seyit to keep beating him but he eventually stopped, lol. In the series, I do not quite understand why he secretly sided with the Bolsheviks. I mean, he comes from a wealthy noble family, so what was in it for him?

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    Quote Originally Posted by topaz emerald View Post
    I wanted seyit to keep beating him but he eventually stopped, lol. In the series, I do not quite understand why he secretly sided with the Bolsheviks. I mean, he comes from a wealthy noble family, so what was in it for him?
    I don't know either... One thing I found interesting... Seyit's granddaughter said on the you tube page that Petro and Celil never went to Istanbul.. that was added to the series to make it more "intriguing". Have you finished the whole series?

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    Quote Originally Posted by crowfamily View Post
    I don't know either... One thing I found interesting... Seyit's granddaughter said on the you tube page that Petro and Celil never went to Istanbul.. that was added to the series to make it more "intriguing". Have you finished the whole series?
    One question I do have - could you please post on this thread the link on the You Tube page you keep referring to?
    Many thanx.

    In regards to Petro joining the Bolsheviks: that is why he was called a traitor. It was probably to save his own skin and to stay wealthy by going over
    to the other side (Bolsheviks) and pointing out to them how useful he could be alive as a spy, rather than just another dead White Russian.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladyhawk View Post
    One question I do have - could you please post on this thread the link on the You Tube page you keep referring to?
    Many thanx.

    In regards to Petro joining the Bolsheviks: that is why he was called a traitor. It was probably to save his own skin and to stay wealthy by going over
    to the other side (Bolsheviks) and pointing out to them how useful he could be alive as a spy, rather than just another dead White Russian.
    oh, yes, you are right. Now I recall he said something like, I've given you weapons and money, etc., so let my folks go, since the bolsheviks captured his parents...man, what a traitor and coward.

    Quote Originally Posted by crowfamily View Post
    I don't know either... One thing I found interesting... Seyit's granddaughter said on the you tube page that Petro and Celil never went to Istanbul.. that was added to the series to make it more "intriguing". Have you finished the whole series?
    Yes, she did say that Petro and celil never went to Istanbul, instead Seyit killed Petro with the help of Celil in the Crimea. No, I haven't finished it....but I will

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    One key element to this love story, is how the political climate affected their personal lives and also affected the choices they each made.
    After Sura left Turkey and went to Paris, many terrible things happened to the Crimean Turks who had left Russia & the Crimea and returned to their ancestral homeland (Turkey) after the Bolshevik Revolution.
    The Crimean Turks were known as the Tatars, and were for the most part, Muslims who considered themselves to be Russian. I saw this clearly in one scene were Seyit is explaining to Murca (?) how he wanted to have a
    Russian restaurant, where the White Russians could congregate, eat ‘borscht' and there would be a 'balalaika' in the corner, should anyone care to play.

    From e-Tatars: Virtual Community-
    Quote: “It was estimated that between 1783 and 1920, some 1.800.000 Crimean Tatars were forced to emigrate to the Ottoman Empire and thus became a "minority" in their ancestral homeland. The Crimean Tatar population decreased to less than 300,000 on the eve of the Bolshevik Revolution (1917).

    Perhaps the most terrible date in the Crimean Tatar history is May 18, 1944. On that day and the following days, the entire Crimean Tatar population, mostly women, children and the elderly, was rounded up, taken to the nearest train station to be loaded onto cattle wagons, and shipped off to the Urals, Siberia and Central Asia (mostly Uzbekistan). Due to hunger, thirst, and disease, about half of the total Crimean Tatar population perished during deportation. The survivors of this tragic event were forced to live in "Special Settlement Camps.” End quote.

    http://www.iccrimea.org/scholarly/e-tatars.html

    I can plainly see, that in Seyit’s eyes, his people had suffered greatly. So by 1945, troubled by failing health (he must have been in his 50’s) knowing he could never go back to the Crimea, nor could he go to the West (Sura), he must have felt that there was no reason to continue. His world & health had vanished, and probably so had all his hopes and dreams.
    Last edited by Ladyhawk; 02-04-2017 at 12:01 AM.

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    Thank you!

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    Thank you !

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    Thank you for posting ... extremely interesting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladyhawk View Post
    One key element to this love story, is how the political climate affected their personal lives and also affected the choices they each made.
    After Sura left Turkey and went to Paris, many terrible things happened to the Crimean Turks who had left Russia & the Crimea and returned to their ancestral homeland (Turkey) after the Bolshevik Revolution.
    The Crimean Turks were known as the Tatars, and were for the most part, Muslims who considered themselves to be Russian. I saw this clearly in one scene were Seyit is explaining to Murca (?) how he wanted to have a
    Russian restaurant, where the White Russians could congregate, eat ‘borscht' and there would be a 'balalaika' in the corner, should anyone care to play.

    From e-Tatars: Virtual Community-
    Quote: “It was estimated that between 1783 and 1920, some 1.800.000 Crimean Tatars were forced to emigrate to the Ottoman Empire and thus became a "minority" in their ancestral homeland. The Crimean Tatar population decreased to less than 300,000 on the eve of the Bolshevik Revolution (1917).

    Perhaps the most terrible date in the Crimean Tatar history is May 18, 1944. On that day and the following days, the entire Crimean Tatar population, mostly women, children and the elderly, was rounded up, taken to the nearest train station to be loaded onto cattle wagons, and shipped off to the Urals, Siberia and Central Asia (mostly Uzbekistan). Due to hunger, thirst, and disease, about half of the total Crimean Tatar population perished during deportation. The survivors of this tragic event were forced to live in "Special Settlement Camps.” End quote.

    http://www.iccrimea.org/scholarly/e-tatars.html

    I can plainly see, that in Seyit’s eyes, his people had suffered greatly. So by 1945, troubled by failing health (he must have been in his 50’s) knowing he could never go back to the Crimea, nor could he go to the West (Sura), he must have felt that there was no reason to continue. His world & health had vanished, and probably so had all his hopes and dreams.
    yes, how tragic...

    From the readings on wikipedia and the source your provided, they were definitely a displaced ethnic Turk group of people who lived in the Crimea since the 10th century. I wonder why Seyit's family, if true that his father was a colonel, and Seyit, a Lieutenant joined the Tsar's army. There is a scene where Seyit returns to Alushta to visit his family before returning to the front, and his father tells him he has to someday return to crimea and live in his ancestral land as their people have lived there for generations. So it sounds like his family were wealthy landowners for generations, and it's just my speculation, but perhaps in order to keep their ancestral land, one way was to join the tsar's army, even if they had to fight against his own people??? do you remember the scene where Petro tells him he would be sent to the front to fight against turks?? maybe I mis-read the English subtitles...I think it was episode 2 or 3....

    And was it really true that Seyit's father really disapproved his courtship with Shura and told him he had to marry a Turk?

    eta: by the way, I have a 6th grade memory of the map of eastern europe, so I had to revisit it, lol.... Alushta is on the southern coast of the Crimea, north of the Black Sea.
    Last edited by topaz emerald; 02-04-2017 at 01:24 AM.

  19. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by topaz emerald View Post
    yes, how tragic...

    From the readings on wikipedia and the source your provided, they were definitely a displaced ethnic Turk group of people who lived in the Crimea since the 10th century. I wonder why Seyit's family, if true that his father was a colonel, and Seyit, a Lieutenant joined the Tsar's army. There is a scene where Seyit returns to Alushta to visit his family before returning to the front, and his father tells him he has to someday return to crimea and live in his ancestral land as their people have lived there for generations. So it sounds like his family were wealthy landowners for generations, and it's just my speculation, but perhaps in order to keep their ancestral land, one way was to join the tsar's army, even if they had to fight against his own people??? do you remember the scene where Petro tells him he would be sent to the front to fight against turks?? maybe I mis-read the English subtitles...I think it was episode 2 or 3....

    And was it really true that Seyit's father really disapproved his courtship with Shura and told him he had to marry a Turk?
    To be in the military and serve at the request of the Czar would have been a great honor, as was evidenced in various episodes thruout the series.
    In addition, again gleaned form the series, they considered themsleves to be Russian and their loyalty, especially considering their wealth, would have
    been absolutely for the Czar. Intertwined with that was the strong ties to the ancient Turkish origins as well, so when Seyit was told to go to Galicia,
    he was very upset to learn that he might have to fight against the Turks, a double whammy due to their origins and well as their religion!

    Until I read the book in English I can only speculate, but it sounds plausible to me that Seyit’s father may have indeed had this sentiment towards
    whoever Seyit picked as a wife. In those times, and this also comes thru in the episodes, filial piety and devotion to family and religion was paramount
    to a man’s honor and standing in that society. To cross ones father and hence the family and by extension established religious & societal practices was to risk loosing everything that one held dear. Again, honor and duty crops up for Seyit in that specific issue. In the Islamic tradtion, one did not marry outside the faith, especially in those years. So to answer your question, I could see that happening quite easily. As I mentioned, until I read the book I won’t know for sure.

    And that is proving to be quite a challenge. Cannot locate an English version so far. A link that was provided by another poster here did not work.

    Incidentally, I also took a look at the map of that area. If one had to go to the south of the Crimea from St Petersberg, that was an extremely long way to go in a horse drawn carriage! An as an aside- the Crimea and Istanbul for that matter now finds itself in the very hotbed of political instability.
    Not the place to be right now, its a veritable powder keg of unrest no matter which way one turns. The Ukraine to the north, to the south, Lebanon, Syria, Iran and Iraq.
    Last edited by Ladyhawk; 02-04-2017 at 03:03 AM.

  20. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladyhawk View Post
    To be in the military and serve at the request of the Czar would have been a great honor, as was evidenced in various episodes thruout the series.
    In addition, again gleaned form the series, they considered themsleves to be Russian and their loyalty, especially considering their wealth, would have
    been absolutely for the Czar. Intertwined with that was the strong ties to the ancient Turkish origins as well, so when Seyit was told to go to Galicia,
    he was very upset to learn that he might have to fight against the Turks, a double whammy due to their origins and well as their religion!

    Until I read the book in English, I can only speculate, but it sounds pluasible to me that Seyit’s father may have indeed had this sentiment towards
    whoever Seyit picked as a wife. In those times, and this also comes thru in the episodes, filial piety and devotion to family and religion was paramount
    to a man’s honor and standing in that society. To cross ones father and hence the family and by extension established religious & societal practices was to risk loosing everything that one held dear. Again, honor and duty crops up for Seyit in that specific issue. In the Islamic tradtion, one did not marry outside the faith, especially in those years. So to answer your question, I could see that happening quite easily. As I mentioned, until I read the book I won’t know for sure.


    And that is proving to be quite a challenge. Cannot locate an English version so far. A link that was provided by another poster here did not work.

    Incidentally, I also took a look at the map of that area. If one had to go to the south of the Crimea from St Petersberg, that was an extremely long way to go in a horse drawn carriage! An as an aside- the Crimea and Istanbul for that matter now finds itself in the very hotbed of political instability.
    Not the place to be right now, its a veritable powder keg of unrest no matter which way one turns. The Ukraine to the north, to the south, Lebanon, Syria, Iran and Iraq. :shocked
    :
    Yes, I agree....

    Indeed, that journey is as far as Houston to San Francisco!
    Not a good time to travel to those areas indeed, but airfare and hotels probably inexpensive, lol...

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