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Thread: Ted Barton interviews Eteri Tutberidze

  1. #341
    Bona Fide Member plushyfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by La Rhumba View Post
    But Hungary has had World Champions in the past - Kristina Regoezcy & Andras Sallay in Dance, 1980 Worlds gold, Olympic silver (controversially) trained by Britain's doyenne of Dance Betty Callaway who also coached Torvill & Dean.
    Diana Poth, who Chris Howarth of Eurosport called "My Diana" and swooned for, who was a very artistic skater in early 2000s. Julia Sebestyen, who had great jumps, in the same era. Nora Hoffman & Gyorgy Elek top 10 in Europeans in Dance, and Gyorgy is now a top Official. These are just skaters that I remember, there must be loads more from earlier times. Be proud! And recognize your own country's skaters! It doesn't have to be ALL about the big 4.
    Do you think I dont know my old and recent skaters? Plus Krisztina Czakó I watched the fs since my childhood. But compared to Russia or other great skating nations we are small.

  2. #342
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam-Skwantch View Post
    Do we really know that the coaches don’t offer their students advice and make recommendations on how to maintain a healthy diet during their break? I suspect they get lots of information on nutrition for not only weekends away but year round too. I actually find it hard to believe that any athlete at the top of their field wouldn't. Seems like the girls get so much attention from the coaching staff both on and off ice. It just seems unlikely to assume that the coaches wouldn’t do that. Now how the students interpret that advice might be another issue.

    FWIW: I noticed a lot of people running on the trail the other day (right after Christmas). Probably working off that Christmas Junk food. It’s fairly common among people I know to indulge in sugary and other tasty treats during the break and then try to work it off. I was alone for my run this morning
    There might have been something lost in translation. But on the talk show the girls did shortly after winning nationals, they were asked something like do they have any foods they aren't allowed to eat. And their response was no but that they would be weighed when they get back. I agree that no foods should be off limits but the focus should be on moderation and not emphasizing the weighing after break.

  3. #343
    Medalist Alexz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam-Skwantch View Post
    FWIW: I noticed a lot of people running on the trail the other day (right after Christmas). Probably working off that Christmas Junk food. It’s fairly common among people I know to indulge in sugary and other tasty treats during the break and then try to work it off. I was alone for my run this morning
    Because I was at my spin class and then played racquetball with my pal for 2 hours. Those holiday fats dont come off easy.

  4. #344
    On the Ice Mathman's Avatar
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    I don't know. Dave Lease isn't Satan, just a guy who likes to chat about figure skating.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexz View Post
    I remember Jenny Kirk was a host of TSL, well she was and is a marvelous SKATER.
    Jenny Kirk's career is actually quite relevant to this discussion. She suffered silently from anorexia for years before abruptly quitting figure skating cold turkey just before the 2006 Olympics, where she had a pretty good chance of making the team. She never regretted the decision, which she credits with saving her life.

    In this interview from 2007 she estimates that, based on her touring with all the top skaters, about 85% of elite skaters suffer from eating disorders.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/lesle..._b_430032.html

  5. #345
    Medalist Alexz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    Jenny Kirk's career is actually quite relevant to this discussion. She suffered silently from anorexia for years before abruptly quitting figure skating cold turkey just before the 2006 Olympics, where she had a pretty good chance of making the team. She never regretted the decision, which she credits with saving her life.

    In this interview from 2007 she estimates that, based on her touring with all the top skaters, about 85% of elite skaters suffer from eating disorders.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/lesle..._b_430032.html
    Yes, I remember that very clearly. She had such a great potential! I personally was heartbroken. I was younger back then and clearly emotionally invested, I had a bit of crush on her. She was so great in juniors!

  6. #346
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    I don't know. Dave Lease isn't Satan, just a guy who likes to chat about figure skating.



    Jenny Kirk's career is actually quite relevant to this discussion. She suffered silently from anorexia for years before abruptly quitting figure skating cold turkey just before the 2006 Olympics, where she had a pretty good chance of making the team. She never regretted the decision, which she credits with saving her life.

    In this interview from 2007 she estimates that, based on her touring with all the top skaters, about 85% of elite skaters suffer from eating disorders.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/lesle..._b_430032.html
    Thank you for that info. I never would have imagined Jenny Kirk had an eating disorder or that she thinks 85% of figure skaters have an eating disorder. This proves it's not just an Eteri issue.

  7. #347
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    In this interview from 2007 she estimates that, based on her touring with all the top skaters, about 85% of elite skaters suffer from eating disorders.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/lesle..._b_430032.html
    That's not actually what she said. She said 85% had some type of disordered eating, which is not the same as having an eating disorder.

    According to this blog from National Eating Disorder Association
    https://www.nationaleatingdisorders....ordered-eating
    Normalized, non-disordered eating is when one mindfully consumes food when hungry and is able to stop when full. Additionally, they incorporate variety into their diet. Now, according to this definition, many people I know, who consider themselves to have a terrific relationship with food, may be classified as “disordered eaters”: they eat when they’re bored, have the same thing for lunch each day, cut out a main food group, etc. Societal standards and pressures, as well as preoccupations with weight loss and exercise, may lead individuals to alter/manipulate their food intake. For many people, this “works.” It does not interfere with their lives; they are able to find food they’re comfortable with at any restaurant, and there is no desire to change.

  8. #348
    On the Ice Mathman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sheetz View Post
    That's not actually what she said. She said 85% had some type of disordered eating, which is not the same as having an eating disorder.
    Reading the article as a whole, though, I don't think that Kirk's main thrust is semantics. She is not, after all, a research scholar or medical professional, just someone with her own story to tell.

    Lesleyann Coker: How pervasive are eating disorders in figure skating? In your opinion, what percentage of skaters suffer from the disease?

    Jenny Kirk: Eating disorders are incredibly secretive. If one was to attend a skating competition, or even eat a meal with a skater, it would be really hard to pick out which skaters were and were not suffering from disordered eating. It wasn’t until I was on tour, spending months at a time with the best skaters in the world, that I saw how prevalent disordered eating was amongst the top skaters in the sport.
    LC: From your experience, how does the eating disorder start and when?

    JK: Every individual who has struggled with an eating disorder has a different story to tell as to how the disorder started. The one common thread, however, is that an eating disorder isn’t something that a person “comes down with” overnight; rather, it’s a gradual progression where the disorder grows over time. For me personally, I started to control the types of food I was eating—think labeling foods “good” and “bad”—after a disappointing finish at the 2003 National Championships. At the time I believed that if I became very aware of the types of food that were going into my body, how hard I was working out off the ice, and how much I weighed, then I would be able to control my results on the ice.
    LC: Describe the lengths you and/or your fellow skaters went through to control weight, i.e. over-exercise, diuretics, laxatives, vomiting?

    JK: Skaters, or any individual suffering from an eating disorder, will go through any and all lengths to control their weight. Particularly in a sport like skating, over-exercising is extremely common. When I was competing, I would skate three hours a day and workout at the gym every morning for a little over an hour. If I felt “fat” or if I ate something that I felt I shouldn’t have, I would make myself go back to the gym for a few hours in the evening before bed in order to “erase” whatever I had eaten. I was also bulimic and would binge and purge regularly. Although I never used laxatives, they are very common in the skating world as well.
    LC: Skating requires enormous muscle strength, yet eating disorders by definition cause the body to devour its own muscle. How do skaters cope with these diametrically opposed goals of strength and weight?

    JK: This is what is so tough about athletes suffering with eating disorders. As a person’s muscle strength diminishes, it becomes incredibly hard to find the strength and stamina needed to get through rigorous long programs and training sessions. I remember as I fell deeper into the disorder, it became increasingly difficult for me to find the energy needed to complete my run throughs. Although I probably should have understood that this meant I had to eat more, I punished myself, thinking that my stamina was lacking because I was out of shape and eating too much.

  9. #349
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    Reading the article as a whole, though, I don't think that Kirk's main thrust is semantics. She is not, after all, a research scholar or medical professional, just someone with her own story to tell.
    I'm simply clarifying what she said about the 85% figure. Jenny may not be a medical professional but she used the expression, which is an actual clinical term, so I assume she is familiar with its meaning. I'm not a medical professional either but I know that disordered eating and an eating disorder are not the same.

  10. #350
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    How can EG possibly keep her incredible stable of ladies figure skaters happy in the coming years? I hope she can do it.

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