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Thread: Is it good idea to try EDEA boots?

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    Is it good idea to try EDEA boots?

    I began skating last year and I fell in love with it. I´m attempting waltz jumps,single jumps, one foot spins...I currently have Riedell Diamonds and I know that they´re good for beginners. Do you think that I would try Edeas? I´ve heard that they are so comfortable and light. Which model is better for me? Overture or Chorus?

  2. #2
    Rinkside
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    It’s hard to say if a particular boot will work for you until you try it on. A lot of folks love their Edeas, and there are just as many folks who really hate them. They get a lot of good rep for being comfortable, but some people find them hard to adjust to because they generally have a higher heel and looser ankle than most other brands. If you like the way your Riedells fit, there’s not a compelling reason to change brands unless you try the Edeas on and like the fit better.

    Which boot you should look at depends on your weight as well as your skill level. For the skills you’re describing, the Overture would probably be supportive enough, but if you’re progressing fast or you’re on the heavier side (eg you’re an adult skater), you may want the extra support of the Chorus.

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    If you really want to switch brand I suggest you go to a good pro shop, where you can try on different boots and be properly fitted. Before considering Edea, know that Edea boots are very different from traditional boots. They might feel loose, or even wobbly at the ankles. I'm an adult skater and I have Edea Chorus ( all singles, axel included) . At first It wasn't easy to adapt to the feeling of Edeas since I was used to Graf, which I've never loved particularly because they were to stiff for my personal taste. Anyway, the first time I skated with Edeas I felt like I could hurt my ankles in a horrible way. But then I adjusted after a few sessions and now I'm so happy with them that I would never switch brand again.
    A good fit depends on many variables such as skills, weight and also personal taste. Some people tried Edea and hate them, while some people love them. If I were you I would consider any model from Chorus to Ice Fly. Overture may be too soft for your skills since you're an adult.

  4. #4
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    Go to fitter/skate tech to discuss your options. As thesoundofice mentioned, Edea are different than traditional boots. They do feel loose when compares to brands like Jacksons or Riedell, the only brands I've skated in. For me, Edea fit my wide feet. I wear E width and they feel comfortable compared to my old Jacksons. You will probably have to switch out the insole to something else to help with the arch support in the Edeas. My current combo is Superfeet carbon with Edea Concerto.

    The nice thing about Edea, according to my skate tech, is that you can't overboot in Edea due to the different lacing technique, AKA the looseness you feel in your ankles.

    Good luck

  5. #5
    Medalist Sam L's Avatar
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    If you can’t overboot, why even have different stiffness. Why not just have maximum stiffness and one boot for all?

  6. #6
    Rinkside WednesdayMarch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimiskates View Post
    I began skating last year and I fell in love with it. I´m attempting waltz jumps,single jumps, one foot spins...I currently have Riedell Diamonds and I know that they´re good for beginners. Do you think that I would try Edeas? I´ve heard that they are so comfortable and light. Which model is better for me? Overture or Chorus?
    If you're comfortable and supported in your current boots, why would you change to something completely different? If it ain't broke, don't try to fix it. You may well find that you've spent a lot of money and made a horrible mistake. And those mistakes are never immediately apparent, ie when you try the boot on at the fitter/shop...

    Seriously, whilst lower level skaters are often keen to change to what they perceive to be the "best" boot or what is currently in vogue, more seasoned skaters are usually very reluctant and for good reason. They know all about the discomfort/pain of breaking in new boots and the struggle as you adjust to changes in equipment. It isn't a golden ticket to magically improved skating (sorry) so I would suggest that when you actually need new boots, you try more than just Edeas...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam L View Post
    If you can’t overboot, why even have different stiffness. Why not just have maximum stiffness and one boot for all?
    Cost and preference. The less stiff boots cost less and some prefer the feel and/or look.

  8. #8
    Tripping on the Podium DanseMacabre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam L View Post
    If you can’t overboot, why even have different stiffness. Why not just have maximum stiffness and one boot for all?
    Quote Originally Posted by VegMom View Post
    Cost and preference. The less stiff boots cost less and some prefer the feel and/or look.
    Just to clarify: When someone says it's difficult to overboot in Edea, it doesn't mean that the support provided by all the models is interchangeable. It just means the construction of the boot and lacing technique won't physically hold a skater back the same way a more traditional boot construction would. Even skaters who are lighter or not particularly strong can still get a decent ankle bend in an Edea. That's also why the break-in time is so much shorter for them than for traditional boots. The throat of the boot (just around the tongue, not side to side or to the back of the ankle) is more open which allows for a bit more freedom when flexing the foot but the there is still a significant difference across models, especially in terms of lateral support of the ankle and tongue stiffness.

  9. #9
    Rinkside
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    DanseMacabre I completely agree with you. You can't overboot in Edea because ankle motion is different. I had the chance to try Chorus, Concerto and Ice Fly. As far as I'm concerned, every model has a different feeling. Particularly Concerto. The tongue is very stiff, actually stiffer than Ice Fly.

  10. #10
    Tripping on the Podium DanseMacabre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesoundofice View Post
    DanseMacabre I completely agree with you. You can't overboot in Edea because ankle motion is different. I had the chance to try Chorus, Concerto and Ice Fly. As far as I'm concerned, every model has a different feeling. Particularly Concerto. The tongue is very stiff, actually stiffer than Ice Fly.
    The tongue is actually one of the reasons why I went for the Concerto over the Ice Fly! I was on the mend from an ankle injury at the time and it felt the most supportive to me.

  11. #11
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    Like others suggested, try a few different brands of boots at the skating shop and see how Edea’s feel in comparison to the others. Not everyone likes them.

  12. #12
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    Stiffness is for jumps. Less stiff for entry level skaters and higher stiffness for advanced skaters; single jumps to triples/quads. The stiffness in association with quads allow for slower breakdown in accordance to the stiffness level. Also, the different stiffness allow for different fees, as well as beijg able to support a variety of body types. Example, a heavy skater that is less advanced can get Edea Concerto/Fly/Piano and not have their boots breakdown as fast as boots like the Edea Chorus/Overture.

  13. #13
    Tripping on the Podium vlaurend's Avatar
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    It's an expensive experiment. Even if they feel fine when you try them on in the shop, you won't really know until you mount the blades and get on the ice with them, and then it's too late to return them. So see if you can find a friend with the same sized feet who already has them and will let you try theirs on on the ice.
    My issue with Edeas was that my ankles did not feel like they had any lateral support. I'm used to the sides of my boots fitting snugly and supporting my ankle but I could never get the sides to press in enough (in spite of lacing them the "proper" Edea way) and when I tried to skate in them I felt like I could not stay on top of the blade; I would fall onto an inside or outside edge unless I put all of my strength into just staying on top of the blade. Maybe it's just because I've been in SP Teri boots for 20 years, but I just didn't have the time or energy to learn to skate all over again in the things.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by WednesdayMarch View Post
    If you're comfortable and supported in your current boots, why would you change to something completely different? If it ain't broke, don't try to fix it. You may well find that you've spent a lot of money and made a horrible mistake. And those mistakes are never immediately apparent, ie when you try the boot on at the fitter/shop...

    Seriously, whilst lower level skaters are often keen to change to what they perceive to be the "best" boot or what is currently in vogue, more seasoned skaters are usually very reluctant and for good reason. They know all about the discomfort/pain of breaking in new boots and the struggle as you adjust to changes in equipment. It isn't a golden ticket to magically improved skating (sorry) so I would suggest that when you actually need new boots, you try more than just Edeas...
    So true, I constantly think of upgrading my skates and dream that the new equipment can instantly fix my wonky skating, lol.

  15. #15
    Rinkside
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    Honestly, I'm in agreement with those saying unless you've got major issues with your boots, stick with the same brand. I speak from experience.

    I didn't get on with the Overtures I had - they made my ankle bleed as I was breaking them in, arch pain, had to have the toe box punched out and still didn't totally fix the problem of my baby toes having nowhere to live, and hated not feeling supported round the ankle. Stuck with them for 4 years. Have been back in Jacksons, the Debut (first boots before the Edeas where Jackson Mystiques) and have had a very happy 12 months of skating so far.
    Not all boots fit all feet - if your feet are happy in your Riedells don't rock the boat.

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