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Thread: Teaching Aides? And Why Not?

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    Here for the High Lord of Extra TallyT's Avatar
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    Teaching Aides? And Why Not?

    This was mentioned in Yuzu's fan fest but it's too much fun not to take further. Professor Meyers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison is using high-tech skating as one part of his teaching aides for his geoscience classes, and even as part of his work to counter fake science
    https://news.wisc.edu/geoscience-beginnings/

    He "showed the students a YouTube video of Olympic gold medalist figure skater, Yuzuru Hanyu, performing his winning routine. In it, Hanyu is completing multiple rotations on the ice and his speed changes when he goes from arms and leg outstretched, to a tucked position. Meyers used this to explain the conservation of angular momentum, or the change in the spin of the solar system and objects within it, as they get smaller (contract) or larger (expand)." The lectures also include music (from local bands) and sound to tie into science.

    It did put me in mind me of a time long ago when I actually sat in on an science class that used swimmers (well, it was Australia!) and horse-racing (well, it was November!) to illustrate the science and physics of movement. But it also makes me wonder - what other classes, with a bit of imagination, use skaters as teachers' aides? (and no, I don't mean medical students learning all about the ways a body can be busted up, thank you... or fashion schools extolling the Korean ladies, although now I think of it...)

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    On the Ice Mathman's Avatar
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    Not the physics of movement, but I remember one time a research team put out an anatomical study of how Shizuka Arakawa could bend her back that way on her Ina Bauer. Evidently she had some sort of medical anomaly in the way two lubar vertebrae met, or something like that, which made it possible.

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    I remember a story about Sarah Hughes finding herself being used as an example in a physics (I think) lecture at Yale. The professor didn't realize she was in the course. I can't find it now, but perhaps someone else will have a better memory (or better Google skills) than I do.

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    Tripping on the Podium
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    Quote Originally Posted by ribbit View Post
    I remember a story about Sarah Hughes finding herself being used as an example in a physics (I think) lecture at Yale. The professor didn't realize she was in the course. I can't find it now, but perhaps someone else will have a better memory (or better Google skills) than I do.
    This one?
    https://www.instagram.com/p/t3CH1FxidH/

  5. #5
    Praise our Little Bear Coryocris's Avatar
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    Not exactly aides but this paper uses Yulia's Olympic Freeskate to show the results of their implementation: https://github.com/facebookresearch/VideoPose3D

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    Making rhinestone vest and tie combos cool anonymoose_au's Avatar
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    Plushy was used as an example of angular momentum (I don't know what that is) in a textbook called Physics for Scientists and Engineers.

    https://s20.postimg.cc/x0c0tudkd/Ang...m_Skater_2.jpg

    I have no idea why they chose skating and Plushy to demonstrate this, but whatever.

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    On the Ice Mathman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ribbit View Post
    I remember a story about Sarah Hughes finding herself being used as an example in a physics (I think) lecture at Yale. The professor didn't realize she was in the course. I can't find it now, but perhaps someone else will have a better memory (or better Google skills) than I do.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scout View Post
    I believe it was Sasha Cohen at Columbia. (She was going by the name "Alex" at the time. ). As I remember the story, she wrote on her paper, "I AM Sasha Cohen. Do I get extra credit?"

    By the way, the answer to the question is, "Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives." This used to happen all the time under 6.0 scoring -- a skater "needs help" from someone else to win. The idea is that if Kwan is ahead of Hughes, then what Slutskaya does should not affect that ordering. This can't happen under the IJS. If Kwan has 180 points and Hughes has 170 points, then Kwan will finish higher than Hughes no matter what Irina does.

    (This competition is not, however, a totally pure example of the violation of the Independence principle. If you take Slutskaya out of the contest altogether, then Hughes gets third in the short and first in the free and wins the gold medal anyway.)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymoose_au View Post
    Plushy was used as an example of angular momentum (I don't know what that is) in a textbook called Physics for Scientists and Engineers.

    https://s20.postimg.cc/x0c0tudkd/Ang...m_Skater_2.jpg

    I have no idea why they chose skating and Plushy to demonstrate this, but whatever.
    Following your lead, I searched for "sarah hughes angular momentum" and found several textbooks, dating back as far as 2003 (i.e. potentially in use during Sarah's time in college), that use her as an example of angular momentum. Perhaps it's a commonplace to use skaters as examples of angular momentum, and textbook authors pick whichever skater comes to mind as their example, which in most cases would be a recent Olympic medalist? I can well imagine that in 2003 an American physicist who didn't follow skating closely, when asked to think of a figure skater, would have thought of Sarah Hughes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scout View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Mathman View Post
    I believe it was Sasha Cohen at Columbia. (She was going by the name "Alex" at the time. ). As I remember the story, she wrote on her paper, "I AM Sasha Cohen. Do I get extra credit?"
    That's a great story too! It's not the one I was thinking of--I've never heard it before--but I love it. Thanks for sharing!

  9. #9
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    As we all know on the fan fest, Yuzuru Hanyu is used in a lot of children's ESL books.

    A Java textbook I looked at had an example about the Sochi gold medal count, but that was just about making tables, not skating itself.

  10. #10
    On the Ice Mathman's Avatar
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    I once used this question on a test.

    Alissa Czisny, two-time U.S. National Figure Skating champion, is from a suburb of Toledo and trained at the Detroit Skating Club in Bloomfield Hills. One day Alissa (a fan of Eratosthenes) took her astrolabe to the skating club and measured the altitude of the North Star. It was 42.6 degrees.

    Then she jumped in her car and drove 62 miles straight south down Telegraph Road to Toledo and repeated the experiment: 41.7 degrees.

    What is the polar circumference of the Earth?

    Answer: 24,800 miles, or 40,000 km.

    [All romantic poets writing in English should be familiar with the "astrolabe". This is the only word in English that rhymes with "babe." (Not counting "wabe" and "outgrabe," words made up by Lewis Carroll for Jabberwocky.) ]

  11. #11
    Rinkside
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    In one of my neuroscience classes, the professor showed a video of a little girl doing a scratch spin, then skating over to look directly into the camera from very close up. This was used to demonstrate post-rotary nystagmus, which is to say that after you spin in circles, your eyes flick left and right in a specific way for several seconds until your brain re-calibrates to being not-spinning.

  12. #12
    How can we know the dancer from the dance? katmari's Avatar
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    A photo of young Jason Brown shows up in a physics textbook:

    https://twitter.com/heather_h10/stat...73921494052864

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