2020 NHK Trophy: Free Dance

Ichatdelune

Long live the Queen and her successors
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Mar 22, 2018
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That's an interesting debate in itself.

I have a number of friends whose families were originally from Hong Kong. (So, they speak Cantonese rather than Mandarin). They were all born in Northern Ireland. One set of siblings primarily use their Anglicised names in everyday life. The other set of siblings primarily use their Chinese names in everyday life. The interesting thing is that the 2 sets of siblings are cousins.

So, it is not straightforward.


CaroLiza_fan
It's a matter of choosing which name will be your primary name, which is closely related to how the person identifies. If they identify, for example, as a native of Northern Ireland born from parents from Hong Kong then they're more likely to use their Western name than their Cantonese name, and if they identify more towards their Hong Kong identity they're more likely to use their Cantonese name. And with Oliver Zhang, when he's not in Japan he always uses Oliver Zhang and has never used Zhang Ruizhong (at least, as far as I know). So in this case it's more likely that Oliver Zhang is his 'original' name.

Going a bit off-topic, but I do hate the notion that a lot of Western people have that second-generation folks in the Western hemisphere are supposed to have their parents' culture name as their 'original' name. Like, for instance, the snowboarder Chloe Kim has a Korean name (Kim Seon) but she never goes by it, her name for all intents and purposes is Chloe Kim. Even in Korea people call her Chloe Kim and not Kim Seon. Yet some people assume that Kim Seon must be her 'real'/'original' name, it drives me nuts.
 
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CaroLiza_fan

EZETTIE LATUASV IVAKMHA
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Yay! Tim speaking in Japanese now!!!

He's actually very good! Although, he did giggle quite a bit during his answers.

Wish I could speak a foreign language as well as he does... :slink:

EDIT: Then I read @zanadude's reply to this post...​

CaroLiza_fan
 

anonymoose_au

Making sequined tie and vest combos cool
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Feb 22, 2014
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I look forward to the day when I can watch Daisuke skate without praying that everybody survives the lifts.
Really I thought Dai was super solid there and was very impressed! I think Nikita is sometimes more wobbly the poor fellow.

Wow Tim's Japanese is good! Go, man!

Awww Misato is most proud. I love happy in love dance couples, I'm a big old sap. 🥰
 

anonymoose_au

Making sequined tie and vest combos cool
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Kind of. I didn't really understand what he was trying to say. But I appreciate the effort.
Oh wait it wasn't good?

I'm not very good at telling, I took Japanese in high school, but I was so terrible... We had to do an oral exam on tape recorder and in the practice one I did so bad I swore and then tried to rewind the tape and accidentally taped over everyone.

Yay! Victory ceremonies!
 

auser

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Dec 5, 2009
Eeek more than an hour til Mens FS. Guess another indoor workout is in order
 

CaroLiza_fan

EZETTIE LATUASV IVAKMHA
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It's a matter of choosing which name will be your primary name, which is closely related to how the person identifies. If they identify, for example, as a native of Northern Ireland born from parents from Hong Kong then they're more likely to use their Western name than their Cantonese name, and if they identify more towards their Hong Kong identity they're more likely to use their Cantonese name. And with Oliver Zhang, when he's not in Japan he always uses Oliver Zhang and have never used Zhang Ruizhong (at least, as far as I know). So in this case it's more likely that Oliver Zhang is his 'original' name.

That is interesting that Oliver doesn't actually use his Chinese name. I wonder does his family use it at home?

Going a bit off-topic, but I do hate the notion that a lot of Western people have that second-generation folks in the Western hemisphere are supposed to have their parent's culture name as their 'original' name. Like, for instance, the snowboarder Chloe Kim has a Korean name (Kim Seon) but she never goes by it, her name for all intents and purposes is Chloe Kim. Even in Korea people call her Chloe Kim and not Kim Seon. Yet some people assume that Kim Seon must be her 'real'/'original' name, it drives me nuts.

Yep, I definitely fall into that category you describe.

I have always been of the belief that people should be proud of their family heritage. And that is why I do not understand why a lot of people (particularly in North America) try to do everything they can to distance themselves from their heritage, or try to hide it. Even accusing you of being racist if you refer to them by their background.

Well, I'm sorry, but if I was living / born in a country where I was considered an ethnic minority, I would be referring to myself primarily by my family background. Becaue that is what made you who you are. And denying it is being disrespectful to your family.

Incidentally, that is why I also don't like it when women take their husband's surname when they get married. Because it is disrespectful to their own family.

And now I am going to run away, because I know that a particular member is always itching to have an argument with me. And I don't want to.

CaroLiza_fan
 
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Skatesocs

Final Flight
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May 16, 2020
That is interesting that Oliver doesn't actually use his Chinese name. I wonder does his family use it at home
I don't think I know any Chinese-American families that use the Chinese names of their children at home. Maybe when they're angry at them :laugh: sometimes end up as the middle names, though.
I have always been of the belief that people should be proud of their family heritage. And that is why I do not understand why a lot of people (particularly in North America) try to do everything they can to distance themselves from their heritage, or try to hide it.
I don't see how using English names means they're not proud of their heritage. They take it as assimilation. You note that with some Chinese scholars who visit the US too, they use English names since it is easier for everyone else to pronounce those, and the pronunciation for Chinese names is extremely specific and tonal.

You'll see Indian-Americans using Indic names though.
 

Ichatdelune

Long live the Queen and her successors
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I don't see how using English names means they're not proud of their heritage. They take it as assimilation. You note that with some Chinese scholars who visit the US too, they use English names since it is easier for everyone else to pronounce those, and the pronunciation for Chinese names is extremely specific and tonal.
This a hundred times, I have a cousin who was born here in Korea then moved to the US when she was seven. Her Korean name is quite difficult for English speakers to get right so she goes by Alice, and she's definitely not hiding her Korean heritage. She just prefers to not have her name butchered every day, and she identifies as Alice as well as her Korean name.

I have a kinda similar thing too although I'm based in Korea, I adopted Sarah as my English name when I was six and I prefer being called Sarah in an English-speaking context even though my Korean name isn't difficult to pronounce in English. I just don't like the changes in intonation and the overall difference in sound quality that happens when my Korean name is spoken in English, it just feels off and not like my name. And I'm a very proud Korean who has never tried passing off as anything else.
 

mikeko666

Final Flight
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Apr 27, 2011
So, the second set of the twizzles is one of the major challenges for Dai. Can anybody here tell why they do CW on their left feet instead of their right feet which seems easier?
 
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Lunalovesskating

Moonbear power 🐻
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Jul 3, 2018
This a hundred times, I have a cousin who was born here in Korea then moved to the US when she was seven. Her Korean name is quite difficult for English speakers to get right so she goes by Alice, and she's definitely not hiding her Korean heritage. She just prefers to not have her name butchered every day, and she identifies as Alice as well as her Korean name.

I have a kinda similar thing too although I'm based in Korea, I adopted Sarah as my English name when I was six and I prefer being called Sarah in an English-speaking context even though my Korean name isn't difficult to pronounce in English. I just don't like the changes in intonation and the overall difference in sound quality that happens when my Korean name is spoken in English, it just feels off and not like my name. And I'm a very proud Korean who has never tried passing off as anything else.
When I lived abroad many Korean and Chinese exchange students used English names when they introduced themselves and then later on revealed their birth names to us once we were close friends. They also prefered it when we used their English names, they felt more comfortable that way, while being in a foreign country. Some came up with names on their own to suit their personality or their favorite professors back home gave them those English names and they cherished those, which I personally found really sweet. Even years later we call them by their English names, because they prefer it when we use them, although we also can pronounce their Korean or Chinese names :)
 

lady_bee

Medalist
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Hi. I just got back from the venue and I am very tired.
But I want to say one thing, when Tim, who's got new Japanese name "Takeru(尊)”, spoke Japanese, we understand what he said. His Japanese is not fluent but good. He sounds like someone who studied Japanese seriously.
What he said is almost same as what he tweeted,

Please excuse my poor English, my brain is almost sleeping.
I also want to defend Kaori in ladies threads , but no energy left now.
 
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