Adult Skater in the market for new boots - feeling confused

Annie122

Rinkside
Joined
Apr 3, 2018
I have been lurking on a lot of boot suggestion threads as of late. I thought it would help, but am admittedly more confused.

I'm a petite (4'11") adult skater who has been skating since Jan 2018. I'm comfortable with forwards, backwards, some footwork, one foot spins, single twizzles, and half jumps.

My current skates are Riedell 119 Emerald Ladies Figure Skates in a size 5 I bought and had fitted at a shop that has since closed. These made sense when I bought them because I was in LTS lessons and was looking for something that would meet my skill level, but also give me some space to grow. I’ve had them for about a year and a half. My concern is that they are becoming very flexible and feel loose. The tops of the skates can easily be squeezed together. I’m going to talk to my LTS instructor about it, but I’m beginning to wonder about how safe they are. I was taught half jumps in them... but after reviewing tech specs... I really don't trust them for that and accept that my instructor probably doesn't know any better.

Long story short, I want to know what I'm getting into... and understand the specs of the boots / blades I'm going to buy.

Since the shop nearest to me closed, I planned on going to a shop about an hour away in the next few weeks and getting fitted.

I looked a little bit online at their stock and saw the motion 255 and the flair by Reidell.

So I decided to e-mail just more so out of curiosity of price range ( I just wanted to see what they would suggest)... and I was met with suggestions that make me wonder if I should consider looking for a different shop.

I stated that I want boots that will last me through single jumps and hopefully last a few years. I have narrow ankles. I used to skate three times a week, right now I'm down to one, but I'm a tad anxious about the state of my boots

They suggested I look into switching into Jacksons with an argument they're more bang for the buck.

At low end:
They're suggestions were
Reidell diamond ~$210 (Support 40 medium)
Jackson Artiste ~ $190 (Support 20/25 which isn't any improvement from the Emeralds? :scratch2:)


Longer than a year:
Reidell Stride ~$300 (Support 50 --> Chart on Reidell says it could go up to an axel)
Reidell Motion ~$400 ( Support 70 --> Advanced instructional)
Jackson Elle ~$260 ( support 30 ---> Moderate) There are so many interesting (in the Midwestern sense) threads on these boots on this forum...
Jackson Freestyle ~$320 (Support 45 ---> Single rotation jumps)

I know the stiffness isn't standardized which makes comparison hard... but I also remember the first fitter feeling that Jackson's weren't a good fit for my feet at the entry level

Am I having delusions of grandeur or is this maybe just advice aimed at cost control? How much should I realistically be looking to spend as an adult upgrading? I think they're concerned about overbooting, but I'm also an adult with feet that are not growing who would love to avoid injury and have well fitted boots that last more than a year...

Have any suggestions of boots I should look into that would possibly be a good fit? Should I get a set again? or blades separately? does this process ever feel less confusing and frustrating?

Thanks for your help!
 
Last edited:

Ic3Rabbit

Le professionnel d'élite
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
I have been lurking on a lot of boot suggestion threads as of late. I thought it would help, but am admittedly more confused.

I'm a petite (4'11") adult skater who has been skating since Jan 2018. I'm comfortable with forwards, backwards, some footwork, one foot spins, single twizzles, and half jumps.

My current skates are Riedell 119 Emerald Ladies Figure Skates in a size 5 I bought and had fitted at a shop that has since closed. These made sense when I bought them because I was in LTS lessons and was looking for something that would meet my skill level, but also give me some space to grow. I’ve had them for about a year and a half. My concern is that they are becoming very flexible and feel loose. The tops of the skates can easily be squeezed together. I’m going to talk to my LTS instructor about it, but I’m beginning to wonder about how safe they are. I was taught half jumps in them... but after reviewing tech specs... I really don't trust them for that and accept that my instructor probably doesn't know any better.

Long story short, I want to know what I'm getting into... and understand the specs of the boots / blades I'm going to buy.

Since the shop nearest to me closed, I planned on going to a shop about an hour away in the next few weeks and getting fitted.

I looked a little bit online at their stock and saw the motion 255 and the flair by Reidell.

So I decided to e-mail just more so out of curiosity of price range ( I just wanted to see what they would suggest)... and I was met with suggestions that make me wonder if I should consider looking for a different shop.

I stated that I want boots that will last me through single jumps and hopefully last a few years. I have narrow ankles. I used to skate three times a week, right now I'm down to one, but I'm a tad anxious about the state of my boots

They suggested I look into switching into Jacksons with an argument they're more bang for the buck.

At low end:
They're suggestions were
Reidell diamond ~$210 (Support 40 medium)
Jackson Artiste ~ $190 (Support 20/25 which isn't any improvement from the Emeralds? :scratch2:)


Longer than a year:
Reidell Stride ~$300 (Support 50 --> Chart on Reidell says it could go up to an axel)
Reidell Motion ~$400 ( Support 70 --> Advanced instructional)
Jackson Elle ~$260 ( support 30 ---> Moderate) There are so many interesting (in the Midwestern sense) threads on these boots on this forum...
Jackson Freestyle ~$320 (Support 45 ---> Single rotation jumps)

I know the stiffness isn't standardized which makes comparison hard... but I also remember the first fitter feeling that Jackson's weren't a good fit for my feet at the entry level

Am I having delusions of grandeur or is this maybe just advice aimed at cost control? How much should I realistically be looking to spend as an adult upgrading? I think they're concerned about overbooting, but I'm also an adult with feet that are not growing who would love to avoid injury and have well fitted boots that last more than a year...

Have any suggestions of boots I should look into that would possibly be a good fit? Should I get a set again? or blades separately? does this process ever feel less confusing and frustrating?

Thanks for your help!

I would find another fitter than the one you inquired with. You need something of the Jackson Freestyle stiffness range but your fitter would have to determine that with you because you said you can't do Jackson boots with your feet. Also, don't do anything else in your current boot because they are more than broken down and you risk injuring yourself.

Good luck!
 

Ohamyooo

Rinkside
Joined
Jul 3, 2018
As an adult skater in Riedells myself, if you like the feel and fit of Riedells, you may be wise to stick with the brand. Every brand fits differently. I'm in the bronze star and find them to be the perfect amount of support. I'm mostly doing moves and ice dance these days--very little jumping, though they feel like they'd give me plenty of support if I did decide to take up jumping. I tried on the motions, too, and they felt very similar to the bronze stars, so it was a toss up. I happened to get a good deal on the bronze stars, so that decided it for me.

I definitely recommend finding an experienced fitter to guide you.
 

Annie122

Rinkside
Joined
Apr 3, 2018
- - - Updated - - -

I would find another fitter than the one you inquired with. You need someone of the Jackson Freestyle stiffness range but your fitter would have to determine that with you because you said you can't do Jackson boots with your feet. Also, don't do anything else in your current boot because they are more than broken down and you risk injuring yourself.

Good luck!

Makes sense, I was bummed because this is the fitter most people in my area recommend and the response was underwhelming.

Thanks for the response, I'll focus on finding a fitter I trust.
 

Annie122

Rinkside
Joined
Apr 3, 2018
As an adult skater in Riedells myself, if you like the feel and fit of Riedells, you may be wise to stick with the brand. Every brand fits differently. I'm in the bronze star and find them to be the perfect amount of support. I'm mostly doing moves and ice dance these days--very little jumping, though they feel like they'd give me plenty of support if I did decide to take up jumping. I tried on the motions, too, and they felt very similar to the bronze stars, so it was a toss up. I happened to get a good deal on the bronze stars, so that decided it for me.

I definitely recommend finding an experienced fitter to guide you.

Glad you found skates that fit you well! I thought those might be a little stiffer than I'm looking for, but my friend has a pair she adores. I'm gonna try to find a fitter whose recommendations make sense. If they don't I'll just say I'm not ready to buy and leave.

That's why I'm more or less trying to have an informed baseline knowledge :confused2: so I can weed out recommendations that seem a little off.
 

tstop4me

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 2, 2015
....
They suggested I look into switching into Jacksons with an argument they're more bang for the buck.
....
Have any suggestions of boots I should look into that would possibly be a good fit? Should I get a set again? or blades separately? does this process ever feel less confusing and frustrating?
....
(1) No competent fitter would recommend that you switch to a particular line of boots before they've viewed and measured your feet.

(2) At your level, you should purchase separate boots and blades; no more kits.

(3) As you learn more about boots and blades, the process will feel less confusing and frustrating. You do need to be skeptical and educate yourself; so you're on the right track. Good luck!
 

Annie122

Rinkside
Joined
Apr 3, 2018
(1) No competent fitter would recommend that you switch to a particular line of boots before they've viewed and measured your feet.

(2) At your level, you should purchase separate boots and blades; no more kits.

(3) As you learn more about boots and blades, the process will feel less confusing and frustrating. You do need to be skeptical and educate yourself; so you're on the right track. Good luck!

I thought that suggestion was strange too... Most of the google reviews (in addition to fellow skater reviews) were positive. One did say they tend to steer people away from Reidell (and I wonder if that mainly has to do with what they have in stock) either way it's weird. I was more so expecting something along the lines of boots at this level will cost $300-500 and blades $150 and up....

I've researched boots pretty obsessively... and if a fitter puts me in something I haven't looked at I'll ask to see technical specs.

Blade wise I'm wondering if I should go up to an intermediate blade since it'll last longer and can be transferred between boots... but off to look at specs.

Thanks for all your help.
 

Ic3Rabbit

Le professionnel d'élite
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
I thought that suggestion was strange too... Most of the google reviews (in addition to fellow skater reviews) were positive. One did say they tend to steer people away from Reidell (and I wonder if that mainly has to do with what they have in stock) either way it's weird. I was more so expecting something along the lines of boots at this level will cost $300-500 and blades $150 and up....

I've researched boots pretty obsessively... and if a fitter puts me in something I haven't looked at I'll ask to see technical specs.

Blade wise I'm wondering if I should go up to an intermediate blade since it'll last longer and can be transferred between boots... but off to look at specs.

Thanks for all your help.

If I were you I would definitely go with an intermediate blade, now how long it will last depends on how much you skate on it and how many sharpenings. They won't last forever.
 

jf12

Final Flight
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Were you thinking that you need a boot that is higher level than they suggest? It could be your height that is guiding them to less stiff boots.
 

MCsAngel2

On the Ice
Joined
Apr 10, 2019
Country
Scotland
It should be more geared to your weight than your height, although at 4'11' I'm assuming you are very petite.
 

Annie122

Rinkside
Joined
Apr 3, 2018
Were you thinking that you need a boot that is higher level than they suggest? It could be your height that is guiding them to less stiff boots.

I just want to have a healthy respect for manufacturers suggestions on skate skills. The red flag for me was that I said I wanted to work on all singles... and this chart from Reidell here https://ice.riedellskates.com/products/boot-range ( sorry I'm being technologically inept and can't figure out how to hyperlink)

Says that diamond is not suitable for flip, loop, lutz, etc.

I get that I'm petite and that could give me some wiggle room on stiffness, but I'm also not 80 pounds...

I think that suggestion may have been made out of cost efficiency, but really it doesn't make sense to me.

I'd like to think that companies are doing some sort of physical and mechanical property (and QA) testing when they're ranking skills with a boot... and that their recommendations are based on some sort of logical testing.
 

WednesdayMarch

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
So I decided to e-mail just more so out of curiosity of price range ( I just wanted to see what they would suggest)... and I was met with suggestions that make me wonder if I should consider looking for a different shop.


I know the stiffness isn't standardized which makes comparison hard... but I also remember the first fitter feeling that Jackson's weren't a good fit for my feet at the entry level

Am I having delusions of grandeur or is this maybe just advice aimed at cost control? How much should I realistically be looking to spend as an adult upgrading? I think they're concerned about overbooting, but I'm also an adult with feet that are not growing who would love to avoid injury and have well fitted boots that last more than a year...

Have any suggestions of boots I should look into that would possibly be a good fit? Should I get a set again? or blades separately? does this process ever feel less confusing and frustrating?

Thanks for your help!

I had a similar experience when I emailed the shop that almost everybody in Britain recommends wholeheartedly. I explained that I am a former pro and coach, with very strong skating and edges and who always danced in seriously strong freestyle boots (back before dance boots/low cuts were a thing). I said I'd like to come for a fitting and was potentially looking at Edea Flamenco, Risport Elite Pro (or whatever the top dance boot is) or Graf Dance. Their recommendation was Edea Overture or Risport Electra Lite... Needless to say I didn't go for a fitting as they are 200 miles away from me and I felt it would be a waste of time and petrol. Other people continue to be very happy with their fitting and service but I just couldn't believe what they were suggesting for me. It helps that I do know what I'm looking for in terms of strength and cut and it's just the actual fitting I wanted.

My feeling is that they take the view that people who are unknown to them are likely to be overestimating their skating standard and needs and also that they were unwilling to order in top end boots for a person they didn't know. I was out of the loop for almost 20 years after an accident so there's no reason they would know me and as a former owner of a bricks and mortar store (unrelated business), I know only too well the risks of ordering things in for people who then say, "Oh, I already bought it elsewhere," when said item arrives. I am confident that they are good with people they know and beginners and actually still recommend them to people who are just starting out.

If you do your research on the makes and models that you feel are appropriate for your level of skating and progression, I think you'll be perfectly fine to go to the shop you emailed for a fitting. You'll have enough knowledge to veto something you really feel isn't right and you can benefit from the fitter's expertise on getting the correct fit.

You should definitely be looking at separate boots and blades. You can't go wrong with Coronation Ace in my view. Although you should understand that they don't last forever and whilst you can transfer them between boots if there's life left in them after your boots break down, it doesn't always work that way as different boots often require different sized blades...

This skating lark is complicated. I recommend something like crochet instead. Unless you're hooked (pun intended) like the rest of us. Then just say goodbye to your money, life and sanity and enjoy the ride.
 

Nimyue

On the Ice
Joined
May 15, 2018
Just want to echo everyone else here. If the Riedell's fit your feet stick with them. And get a boot and blade separately. The bronze star or the Motion would probably be good. Since you're a bit lighter you might prefer the Motion. I'm sort of with Wednesday March on if you are confident in what you want, that fitter is probably fine, as long as you are comfortable sticking to your guns. If you're worried about feeling uncomfortable though, it wouldn't hurt to find a different fitter.

If you're used to Riedells the last thing I'd do is try to put you in Jacksons. They fit very differently, and I think that's the biggest red flag honestly.
 

MiraiFan

On the Ice
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
I got the Riedell Motion when I was at your level and kept them for over three years--passed a few adult tests in them. I loved them but was fitted for them by an expert fitter. I made the switch to Edea because of less break-in time but I sometimes regret it since the Riedells last so much longer than Edeas.
 

Sunshine247

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 17, 2018
I’m going to throw a curveball in here. Jackson’s lower end skates fit very differently than the “fusion series” which is the elle, debut, and up. There is a definite advantage to a fitter who has an open mind to trying other brands. They are probably giving you options so you are prepared when you go into the shop. But be sure to be very aware of fit as you try on the skates. Take your time and ask all the questions you need to.

The Jackson skates tend to have a narrow heel and wider toe box, I believe the Riedells have a more narrow fit over all (?). You’ll have to decide what the right shape is for your foot. Removing the insole and looking at it outside of the boot can be a very useful tool to how they will fit on your foot. But boots have to fit in three dimensions, so take it all in and take your time. You’ve done some research so the terms the skate shop uses will be familiar so you’re about as educated as you could be going in. Most of the boots you’re looking at will offer heat molding which is a great thing for you going forward so be sure to get the fitters help on making them comfortable from the start once you decide on a boot.
 

Nimyue

On the Ice
Joined
May 15, 2018
I’m going to throw a curveball in here. Jackson’s lower end skates fit very differently than the “fusion series” which is the elle, debut, and up. There is a definite advantage to a fitter who has an open mind to trying other brands. They are probably giving you options so you are prepared when you go into the shop. But be sure to be very aware of fit as you try on the skates. Take your time and ask all the questions you need to.

The Jackson skates tend to have a narrow heel and wider toe box, I believe the Riedells have a more narrow fit over all (?). You’ll have to decide what the right shape is for your foot. Removing the insole and looking at it outside of the boot can be a very useful tool to how they will fit on your foot. But boots have to fit in three dimensions, so take it all in and take your time. You’ve done some research so the terms the skate shop uses will be familiar so you’re about as educated as you could be going in. Most of the boots you’re looking at will offer heat molding which is a great thing for you going forward so be sure to get the fitters help on making them comfortable from the start once you decide on a boot.

Except OP needs to be in A Debut Fusion Firm or higher which is a Fusion. They are large, very roomy, with a tall and wide round toe box, which is the exact antithesis of the Riedell. Plus the heel height on the Riedell is one of the lower ones. The heel height on the Fusion is absurd. It's the highest vs Edea, Risport, and Riedell that I have directly compared. I've worn the Fusion soles and they really really tip you forward. They are significantly higher than Edea, which is known to feel like you're tipping forward. OP is not looking for a beginner boot - she's looking for something to take her through singles. She already stated she's comfortable in Riedells.

I've worn Jackson, custom Harlick, custom Jackson, and now Risports. If someone wears a Riedell happily the last brand I'm recommending is Jackson. My DD actually wears Riedells. The fit between models if very similar. She started in Strides and she's actually in Motions now. The last thing I'd put her in is a Jackson for the reasons stated above since her Riedells fit her so flipping well.
 

Annie122

Rinkside
Joined
Apr 3, 2018
Thanks for all your comments and suggestions. I will go to a fitter, the one I inquired with or another, and take my time trying on skates. I'll make sure to make an appointment (and will probably also be a skate mule getting two friends skates sharpened). I'm most anxious about my knowledge of intermediate blades, but I have a baseline understanding so I should be fine. I wish there was an excel file comparing all those "comparative" blades

I walk dogs at an animal shelter and got pulled across a patch of ice by a 70 pound dog so my ankle is a little swollen. Until the swelling is gone I'm just gonna wait.

My feeling is that they take the view that people who are unknown to them are likely to be overestimating their skating standard and needs and also that they were unwilling to order in top end boots for a person they didn't know. I was out of the loop for almost 20 years after an accident so there's no reason they would know me and as a former owner of a bricks and mortar store (unrelated business), I know only too well the risks of ordering things in for people who then say, "Oh, I already bought it elsewhere," when said item arrives. I am confident that they are good with people they know and beginners and actually still recommend them to people who are just starting out.

If you do your research on the makes and models that you feel are appropriate for your level of skating and progression, I think you'll be perfectly fine to go to the shop you emailed for a fitting. You'll have enough knowledge to veto something you really feel isn't right and you can benefit from the fitter's expertise on getting the correct fit.

You should definitely be looking at separate boots and blades. You can't go wrong with Coronation Ace in my view. Although you should understand that they don't last forever and whilst you can transfer them between boots if there's life left in them after your boots break down, it doesn't always work that way as different boots often require different sized blades...

This skating lark is complicated. I recommend something like crochet instead. Unless you're hooked (pun intended) like the rest of us. Then just say goodbye to your money, life and sanity and enjoy the ride.

I think you're right about people being unknown to them, so they're less likely to suggest something more advanced. I also think they're just used to having a young and growing client base.

I feel I should clarify that I don't expect any blade to last forever. I meant in the sense that progression wise it would make sense to go to an intermediate blade as opposed to an entry level for a bit, and then feel like I should switch to something more advanced.

:laugh: It's too late... My brain loves having "fun" cardio and the process of learning new things... and researching skating things instead of adulting (oops). I'm trying to stick to a LTS class that comes with a free pass to public skate. I blame the LTS class. At our best it's four 20 somethings who are all supportive and encouraging. At our worst there are just people everywhere....most of which are teen hockey children crashing into stuff :palmf:

Just want to echo everyone else here. If the Riedell's fit your feet stick with them. And get a boot and blade separately. The bronze star or the Motion would probably be good. Since you're a bit lighter you might prefer the Motion. I'm sort of with Wednesday March on if you are confident in what you want, that fitter is probably fine, as long as you are comfortable sticking to your guns. If you're worried about feeling uncomfortable though, it wouldn't hurt to find a different fitter.

If you're used to Riedells the last thing I'd do is try to put you in Jacksons. They fit very differently, and I think that's the biggest red flag honestly.
I looked into both of those! Thanks for the suggestion, I'll try them on and see how I feel.

I got the Riedell Motion when I was at your level and kept them for over three years--passed a few adult tests in them. I loved them but was fitted for them by an expert fitter. I made the switch to Edea because of less break-in time but I sometimes regret it since the Riedells last so much longer than Edeas.
Glad to hear. Hope the edeas don't break down too quickly.

I’m going to throw a curveball in here. Jackson’s lower end skates fit very differently than the “fusion series” which is the elle, debut, and up. There is a definite advantage to a fitter who has an open mind to trying other brands. They are probably giving you options so you are prepared when you go into the shop. But be sure to be very aware of fit as you try on the skates. Take your time and ask all the questions you need to.

The Jackson skates tend to have a narrow heel and wider toe box, I believe the Riedells have a more narrow fit over all (?). You’ll have to decide what the right shape is for your foot. Removing the insole and looking at it outside of the boot can be a very useful tool to how they will fit on your foot. But boots have to fit in three dimensions, so take it all in and take your time. You’ve done some research so the terms the skate shop uses will be familiar so you’re about as educated as you could be going in. Most of the boots you’re looking at will offer heat molding which is a great thing for you going forward so be sure to get the fitters help on making them comfortable from the start once you decide on a boot.
I agree, it's 100% worth trying on all the boots available and picking what feels the best, then having them heat molded and fitted. I'm not completely counting out Jackson, but the decision will be on if they're comfortable. I've noticed that everyone I know who has gone there seems to leave with Jacksons.

Except OP needs to be in A Debut Fusion Firm or higher which is a Fusion. They are large, very roomy, with a tall and wide round toe box, which is the exact antithesis of the Riedell. Plus the heel height on the Riedell is one of the lower ones. The heel height on the Fusion is absurd. It's the highest vs Edea, Risport, and Riedell that I have directly compared. I've worn the Fusion soles and they really really tip you forward. They are significantly higher than Edea, which is known to feel like you're tipping forward. OP is not looking for a beginner boot - she's looking for something to take her through singles. She already stated she's comfortable in Riedells.

I've worn Jackson, custom Harlick, custom Jackson, and now Risports. If someone wears a Riedell happily the last brand I'm recommending is Jackson. My DD actually wears Riedells. The fit between models if very similar. She started in Strides and she's actually in Motions now. The last thing I'd put her in is a Jackson for the reasons stated above since her Riedells fit her so flipping well.
Fair points. I'll try them on f offered, but I tend to think I'm not going to like the forward tipping feeling. You've been through a lot of different brands, I hope you've found some that work! Glad your daughter is happy with Reidell's.

*fingers crossed to finding a well-fitted boot in the next week or so*
 

Sunshine247

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 17, 2018
Except OP needs to be in A Debut Fusion Firm or higher which is a Fusion. They are large, very roomy, with a tall and wide round toe box, which is the exact antithesis of the Riedell. Plus the heel height on the Riedell is one of the lower ones. The heel height on the Fusion is absurd. It's the highest vs Edea, Risport, and Riedell that I have directly compared. I've worn the Fusion soles and they really really tip you forward. They are significantly higher than Edea, which is known to feel like you're tipping forward. OP is not looking for a beginner boot - she's looking for something to take her through singles. She already stated she's comfortable in Riedells.

I've worn Jackson, custom Harlick, custom Jackson, and now Risports. If someone wears a Riedell happily the last brand I'm recommending is Jackson. My DD actually wears Riedells. The fit between models if very similar. She started in Strides and she's actually in Motions now. The last thing I'd put her in is a Jackson for the reasons stated above since her Riedells fit her so flipping well.

Sheesh. Calm down. I didn’t recommend any skate boot. I said keep an open mind. My DDs skated in basic Riedells and felt good in them until moving up. One stayed in Jacksons and one is in Edea currently. Both felt great in Riedells at first. They developed distinct preferences and had different awareness of fit after skating more. The OP has a better chance of getting the proper skates with more knowledge. I simply described the differences in fit from lower model Jackson’s OP may have tried first vs the fusion series in case it made a difference. I did this specifically since OP was going to be looking at the debut-fusion. I also commented on the three dimensional aspect of fit, ie height of toe box etc. There is an advantage of peace of mind when you make your decision that you’ve got the best option when you’ve actually tried another maker. And ruled out some options. Nothing worse than adjusting to something new and feeling like you may have made the wrong choice.

Also, based on your experience with a variety of boots from different makers, you should be very aware that it might seem like you’ve got a good fit until you’ve tried a different boot. I assume you felt good with your purchase of all those skate boots initially? Could it also be that it’s useful to try other boots before committing? Why did you have so many other skate boots before going to Riedells? It’s unfortunate that you’ve had some issues with fit it seems. But more information isn’t a bad thing and not everyone reading is getting enough info by just repeating the same thing to the OP. I p didn’t describe her foot type at all.

Also, there’s a reason the heel height is different. It’s an effort to change from traditional form and feel that is very successful BTW. If you look at the Riedell website, you’ll see they’ve added two fusion/edea style boots to their lineup. A bunch of new young skaters in these style of boots are extremely successful. The new style seems to be working for skaters without any habits or feel for a traditional boot. The OP hasn’t likely developed enough to be held back. There are no magic skates or magic blades but there’s something behind the development of these new styles. If it were just hype, they would fizzle out. Instead they are gaining traction.

So, previously I just gave some info and recommended the OP take a lot of time at the fitting to get a feel for the skates, and ask a lot of questions. Which seems like OP will do. And mentioned to be sure to get boots further customized by heat molding. I’m glad it sparked a discussion though.

Annie122, I’m sorry to hear about your ankle. I hope you heal quickly and benefitted from the discussions on the site overall. Is there also a coach to recommend blades? I feel like the Coronation Ace is a great blade to move to as well as any intermediate John Wilson or MK blade. Most other blade makers copy them after all. There’s tons of info on this site as well as some art out there illustrating blade rocker profiles. Best to get a description of what your coach feels you need from a blade in case he/she isn’t well versed in the actual different blade options. For instance my coach had a recent recommendation that my daughter move to a more advanced blade and added she needed the stability of the 8’ rocker but the spin rocker was up to her/me. Coach commented she wanted the more aggressive toe pick and a blade that helped her roll up more quickly and load her jumps faster. This meant a more curved spin rocker (the very front portion). I found info on spin rockers and went off of that for my choice.

I should compile a spreadsheet after my extensive research! My fellow rink moms have joked about this as well. If I made a flow chart on choosing blades it would first choose the main rocker of 7’ or 8’. Then choose spin rocker profile, and then chose toe pick style. By then you’ve probably narrowed your choice down to maybe one or two from each maker. The final choice would be based on wether you like the new lightweight styles and which manufacturer you can get, or price. Anyone else want to give input to this process? It seemed to narrow things down for my decision to a more manageable few.
 

WednesdayMarch

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
Thanks for all your comments and suggestions. I will go to a fitter, the one I inquired with or another, and take my time trying on skates. I'll make sure to make an appointment (and will probably also be a skate mule getting two friends skates sharpened). I'm most anxious about my knowledge of intermediate blades, but I have a baseline understanding so I should be fine. I wish there was an excel file comparing all those "comparative" blades

There's this:- https://skaterslanding.com/pages/blade-comparison-chart

Not all of the blades mentioned there are currently made but it should help with the basics. I still advocate the Coronation Ace.
 

cl2

Final Flight
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Plus the heel height on the Riedell is one of the lower ones. The heel height on the Fusion is absurd. It's the highest vs Edea, Risport, and Riedell that I have directly compared. I've worn the Fusion soles and they really really tip you forward. They are significantly higher than Edea, which is known to feel like you're tipping forward.

I've heard many people voicing dislike of the higher heel in Jacksons. So I feel compelled to counter with my personal positive experience, and some logical deductions.

When I was still in Riedells, I always found it hard to get off my toe pick for any kind of move. Then I switched to Jackson (moving my same blades over to the new boot) and suddenly found it so much easier to get off my toe picks and skate on the main rocker. My conjecture is that this was because I have fairly tight calves and Achilles tendons, making my foot more plantar flexed when in a relaxed position. The higher heel might help with adjusting for this plantar flexed position.

The bottom line is, each person has different feet and each boot manufacturer is suited to a subset of skaters with that particular type of foot. Just because some skaters complain about the heel height doesn't mean everyone should stay away. Jacksons is still very much in business, so apparently the heel height must suit a sizeable subset of skaters.
 
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