Advice on skates for unusually narrow and thin feet

NathanH

Spectator
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
Hello everyone
Could anyone recommend a U.K based fitter (I am based in London but happy to travel within the country) of appropriate competence to "diagnose" the best option for a beginner feet of extremely narrow and thin fitting (all the areas: heel, ankle, bridge, arch, sole, instep, achilles) ?
In all my eagerness and ignorance, I purchased a pair of Edea Overture of B Width (the AA Width which would have been more fitted was apparently not available) and find my heels have no maintain when skating, my feet automatically push towards the front of the boot and the sides are not well maintained by the boots, making each movement wobbly. This is troublesome as I am a complete beginner still trying to make my basic gliding coherent.

At the moment I have been trying various DIY (filling the boots with bits of insoles to compensate, skating with thick socks, I also ordered a pair of heel and ankle support sleeves hoping it'll help). In the likelihood that my endeavours lead to no good, I am investigating the existing options for extremely thin feet; and trying to gain real knowledge of how to communicate clearly with a fitter to make the right choice.
My feet have ways been very thin proporsionally to their lenght (39 eur, US 6.5, UK 5.5) and have always had to compromise when buying shoes. The heels almost don't protrude like most heels do, the sides of the feet and ankles are much thinner than most feet considered "narrow". I'm not even sure that any commercialised boot would ever fit but am looking forward to any advices.

Many thanks
 

Elija

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Hi, just so you’re aware, the narrowest fit Edeas come in is B - there is no AA. B is narrower than for other brands’ B though. I was under the impression only chorus and above came in B, not overture, but I could be wrong and they may have expanded their range. Maybe double check they didn’t sell you a C width?? It sounds like your skates are too big in length too, as there’s no way your feet should be sliding forward and backward. You may also like to try another way of lacing, as if they are laced properly across the ankles, your foot should definitely not be able to slide forward like that.

Edeas can also be manipulated to fit your feet better, so it would pay to visit and authorised dealer and have them squeezed in the make them narrower. It have very narrow feet as well and my fitter did this for me when I used to have C width skates. I now have B and they are much better.

If all this fails, try some other brands. I believe Reidell is quite good for narrow feet, but have never tried them personally. Perhaps someone else can can give you more info about that, as I have only skated in risport and edea.
 

hanyuufan5

❅*:・。.✨
Medalist
Joined
May 19, 2018
If all this fails, try some other brands. I believe Reidell is quite good for narrow feet, but have never tried them personally. Perhaps someone else can can give you more info about that, as I have only skated in risport and edea.

Riedells literally make me lose feeling in my little toes. :laugh: I'm a wide width (D ball/C heel) in Jacksons, which run wide as it is, so I don't know if my experience will help OP much, but Riedells definitely run narrow.
 

Ic3Rabbit

Le professionnel d'élite
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
Hi, just so you’re aware, the narrowest fit Edeas come in is B - there is no AA. B is narrower than for other brands’ B though. I was under the impression only chorus and above came in B, not overture, but I could be wrong and they may have expanded their range. Maybe double check they didn’t sell you a C width?? It sounds like your skates are too big in length too, as there’s no way your feet should be sliding forward and backward. You may also like to try another way of lacing, as if they are laced properly across the ankles, your foot should definitely not be able to slide forward like that.

Edeas can also be manipulated to fit your feet better, so it would pay to visit and authorised dealer and have them squeezed in the make them narrower. It have very narrow feet as well and my fitter did this for me when I used to have C width skates. I now have B and they are much better.

If all this fails, try some other brands. I believe Reidell is quite good for narrow feet, but have never tried them personally. Perhaps someone else can can give you more info about that, as I have only skated in risport and edea.

Try Harlicks, OP, they tend to be narrow.

Riedells literally make me lose feeling in my little toes. :laugh: I'm a wide width (D ball/C heel) in Jacksons, which run wide as it is, so I don't know if my experience will help OP much, but Riedells definitely run narrow.

Depends on the Riedell boot model, I used to wear them and I don't have a narrow toebox.
 

NathanH

Spectator
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
I'm certain the model is a B as it's specified in the buyer's booklet that came with it. The fact that my feet slide forward feels like it's induced by the boot area around the heel being too large rather that the skates being to long, but as you said it shouldn't happen if the skates were the right length. My inexperienced lacing definetely's enhanced the overall feeling of looseness and wobbliness, but even when an experienced friend of mine and another experienced skater laced it for me, I could feel some empty spaces were the boot did not touch the heel.
Could you developped with "authorised dealer" as it sound like a good option at this point. How do you research a dealer around you and check if they are authorised? Thanks.
I'll also look into Riedell and Risport as I've heard they are prone to be narrower.


Hi, just so you’re aware, the narrowest fit Edeas come in is B - there is no AA. B is narrower than for other brands’ B though. I was under the impression only chorus and above came in B, not overture, but I could be wrong and they may have expanded their range. Maybe double check they didn’t sell you a C width?? It sounds like your skates are too big in length too, as there’s no way your feet should be sliding forward and backward. You may also like to try another way of lacing, as if they are laced properly across the ankles, your foot should definitely not be able to slide forward like that.

Edeas can also be manipulated to fit your feet better, so it would pay to visit and authorised dealer and have them squeezed in the make them narrower. It have very narrow feet as well and my fitter did this for me when I used to have C width skates. I now have B and they are much better.

If all this fails, try some other brands. I believe Reidell is quite good for narrow feet, but have never tried them personally. Perhaps someone else can can give you more info about that, as I have only skated in risport and edea.
 

NathanH

Spectator
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
Riedells literally make me lose feeling in my little toes. :laugh: I'm a wide width (D ball/C heel) in Jacksons, which run wide as it is, so I don't know if my experience will help OP much, but Riedells definitely run narrow.

Ok thanks that's good to know!
 

tstop4me

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 2, 2015
Could you developped with "authorised dealer" as it sound like a good option at this point. How do you research a dealer around you and check if they are authorised?
Check the websites of the individual manufacturers. Some will list the authorized dealers for your country. If not, email them via the contact email address on their website and ask for authorized dealers in the UK.

There are so many models and sizes of boots that it's not likely you'll be able to try out the ones you're interested in. In the US, a skate tech will take measurements and tracings of your feet and send them to the manufacturer. The manufacturers' service agents will then decide whether there is any suitable stock size, or whether a semi-custom or full custom is needed. Ask whether UK skate techs will do the same.
 

SmallAminal

On the Ice
Joined
Jul 26, 2016
Check the websites of the individual manufacturers. Some will list the authorized dealers for your country. If not, email them via the contact email address on their website and ask for authorized dealers in the UK.

There are so many models and sizes of boots that it's not likely you'll be able to try out the ones you're interested in. In the US, a skate tech will take measurements and tracings of your feet and send them to the manufacturer. The manufacturers' service agents will then decide whether there is any suitable stock size, or whether a semi-custom or full custom is needed. Ask whether UK skate techs will do the same.

If you can't find a good dealer that is close enough to you, try doing your own tracings (have a friend do it sitting and standing) and you can use that information to compare to some of the size charts. Harlick has a very comprehensive size chart as they make a very comprehensive range of widths. Although I would *not* recommend using your tracings as the basis for placing an order, you can use the information, along with other measurements, to get an idea of how narrow your foot really is. Depending on your foot (if it is really unusual), you may find that you need customs just to get the right fit.

I think you know this already, but if you have "difficult" feet, you really do need a good fitter that can assess and understand your feet. I hope you find this somewhere in the UK. The right fit will make all the difference to your comfort and progress.
 

WednesdayMarch

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
Make an appointment with Everglides, down on the south coast in Gosport, Hampshire. They're supposed to be very good and they certainly know all about Edeas. They helped a friend of mine who is a beginner with the opposite problem, feet wider than they are long!

ETA: In the meantime you can try popping in an arch support, which should help you stop sliding forwards in the boot.
 

NathanH

Spectator
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
Make an appointment with Everglides, down on the south coast in Gosport, Hampshire. They're supposed to be very good and they certainly know all about Edeas. They helped a friend of mine who is a beginner with the opposite problem, feet wider than they are long!

ETA: In the meantime you can try popping in an arch support, which should help you stop sliding forwards in the boot.

I'd actually found Everglides after some research and they indeed seem to have the reputation! Not that there seem to be many fitters in the U.K... I'll try to make an appointment with them, thanks for confirming they are good. Re:arch support, I've actually ordered a couple of devices (arch, ankle and heel support, to be on the safe side) that I'll be able to try soon. Thanks.
 

NathanH

Spectator
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
Check the websites of the individual manufacturers. Some will list the authorized dealers for your country. If not, email them via the contact email address on their website and ask for authorized dealers in the UK.

There are so many models and sizes of boots that it's not likely you'll be able to try out the ones you're interested in. In the US, a skate tech will take measurements and tracings of your feet and send them to the manufacturer. The manufacturers' service agents will then decide whether there is any suitable stock size, or whether a semi-custom or full custom is needed. Ask whether UK skate techs will do the same.

I'll look into Edea's website to see if there are any U.K dealers. The US system sounds so convenient: hopefully they'll have a similar one here, as I could really use personalised advice sent directly to manufacturers. Thanks!
 

NathanH

Spectator
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
If you can't find a good dealer that is close enough to you, try doing your own tracings (have a friend do it sitting and standing) and you can use that information to compare to some of the size charts. Harlick has a very comprehensive size chart as they make a very comprehensive range of widths. Although I would *not* recommend using your tracings as the basis for placing an order, you can use the information, along with other measurements, to get an idea of how narrow your foot really is. Depending on your foot (if it is really unusual), you may find that you need customs just to get the right fit.

I think you know this already, but if you have "difficult" feet, you really do need a good fitter that can assess and understand your feet. I hope you find this somewhere in the UK. The right fit will make all the difference to your comfort and progress.

Many thanks, I should have made all that research beforehand to be honest. I will contact a qualified fitter to get some written advice and hopefully schedule an appointment.
 

Ducky

On the Ice
Joined
Feb 14, 2018
Hello everyone
Could anyone recommend a U.K based fitter (I am based in London but happy to travel within the country) of appropriate competence to "diagnose" the best option for a beginner feet of extremely narrow and thin fitting (all the areas: heel, ankle, bridge, arch, sole, instep, achilles) ?
In all my eagerness and ignorance, I purchased a pair of Edea Overture of B Width (the AA Width which would have been more fitted was apparently not available) and find my heels have no maintain when skating, my feet automatically push towards the front of the boot and the sides are not well maintained by the boots, making each movement wobbly. This is troublesome as I am a complete beginner still trying to make my basic gliding coherent.

At the moment I have been trying various DIY (filling the boots with bits of insoles to compensate, skating with thick socks, I also ordered a pair of heel and ankle support sleeves hoping it'll help). In the likelihood that my endeavours lead to no good, I am investigating the existing options for extremely thin feet; and trying to gain real knowledge of how to communicate clearly with a fitter to make the right choice.
My feet have ways been very thin proporsionally to their lenght (39 eur, US 6.5, UK 5.5) and have always had to compromise when buying shoes. The heels almost don't protrude like most heels do, the sides of the feet and ankles are much thinner than most feet considered "narrow". I'm not even sure that any commercialised boot would ever fit but am looking forward to any advices.

Many thanks

Hi my fellow narrow footed, skis for feet person. I wear a street size US 9/9.5 narrow (riedell 7.5 A/AA) and would recommend trying out Riedells but as everyone has said it depends upon the make. But you might be looking into customs.

For regular shoes: I remember from my time in London it seems as if the standard width of shoes available off the high street is waaay wider than the standard American size. I know I couldn't wear heels because my feet would slide out. Have you tried Zappos? The have free shipping to the UK and you can search by width.
 

sandraskates

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 31, 2006
Country
United-States
Many thanks, I should have made all that research beforehand to be honest. I will contact a qualified fitter to get some written advice and hopefully schedule an appointment.

Eh, don't beat yourself up - we're here to help and enlighten! :)
A TV show called Ice Stars has been airing on an obscure channel in my area (I'm in the USA). They focus on the training centre in Birmingham that has a lot of highly competitive skaters. I suggest contacting that ice rink too and asking about their skate tech / fitter, and boots that are available to try on.

I do think Harlicks are going to be a challenge to find in the UK (they manufacture out of Northern California, USA). They are mainly a custom shop now and rarely is a stock boot seen in the shops here. But you can call them up; the owners are super-nice.
 

NathanH

Spectator
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
Hey! Ok I'll now deffo be looking into Riedell. Just having a ski for feet person saying that they DO posess a pair of skates that fits them fills me with hope. Whatever my next move is, I'll certainly check if custom options are better fitted. I assume it's more expensive, but worth it.

I hadn't heard of Zappos before but it seems to promote solution to my life-long shoes issues so I'll be looking into that. 🤔


Hi my fellow narrow footed, skis for feet person. I wear a street size US 9/9.5 narrow (riedell 7.5 A/AA) and would recommend trying out Riedells but as everyone has said it depends upon the make. But you might be looking into customs.

For regular shoes: I remember from my time in London it seems as if the standard width of shoes available off the high street is waaay wider than the standard American size. I know I couldn't wear heels because my feet would slide out. Have you tried Zappos? The have free shipping to the UK and you can search by width.
 

NathanH

Spectator
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
Re:Ice star, I'd heard of it a douzen time but never bothered looking into it because I assumed it was another one of those big prod shows gathering podium champions. Little did I know it's a UK based show following young training skaters 😱 Probably my next binge watch haha. Contacting the Birmingham center is a great idea, putting it on my list of moves in the quest for the fitted skates.
And thanks for the cheer-up ^^

Too bad for Harlicks; still their website has very helpful info about fitting and it's good to know of existing brands. Might give them a call for advice.



Eh, don't beat yourself up - we're here to help and enlighten! :)
A TV show called Ice Stars has been airing on an obscure channel in my area (I'm in the USA). They focus on the training centre in Birmingham that has a lot of highly competitive skaters. I suggest contacting that ice rink too and asking about their skate tech / fitter, and boots that are available to try on.

I do think Harlicks are going to be a challenge to find in the UK (they manufacture out of Northern California, USA). They are mainly a custom shop now and rarely is a stock boot seen in the shops here. But you can call them up; the owners are super-nice.
 
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