Advice on what to buy as an adult beginner(boots, blades, etc.) | Golden Skate

Advice on what to buy as an adult beginner(boots, blades, etc.)

yurix

Spectator
Joined
Oct 10, 2020
hello! if rinks are still available with covid-19 situation, sometime in december i'm planning to start learning figure skating as an adult(20 yo, gonna go to on+off ice training to a fs school) and i need some help before i start. i need some help with both boots and blades and some other stuff, so this is gonna be a long text. as a non-native speaker i apologise in advance for possible mistakes. i also should warn you that weight loss will be briefly mentioned.


1) boots
some information that may be important:
• around 152 cm(google says it's 5'0 feet)
• 67-68 kg(147-150 lbs). but i am losing weight now. by the time i use the skates seriously, i will have lost 2-3 kg(4-7 lbs). with my genetics i don't think i'll ever be less than 53-55 kg(116-121 lbs) or even 55-57 kg(121-126 lbs) with more muscles. and it will take months to get there.
• because of genetics and years of dancing classes i did as a child, i have kinda wide-ish ankle and legs in general(i have also super small shoe size, so the last time i used rental skates, they couldn't even fully wrap my legs)
• i've had a few injuries in ankle area, so i need good support and padding


we have very few fs shops in the city(i would say only two with more or less real variety). and there are reasons, why i'm not sure, that fitters here would help with my best interests in mind. well, i may get lucky, but it's best to ask here in advance and go to the shops more prepared.


i did some research abt what this shops usually sell. and there are mostly 3 brands, which are presented more or less well: edea, risport and jackson. from what i understand, with my weight i should buy skates for a bit higher level than skates officially have(but be careful to avoid overbooting, expecially if it isn't edea).
jackson. i'm not the biggest fan when it comes to ides of buying them. i know they have a padding problem. most of versions of low-lvl skates here are outdated ones. i also for some reason don't like the skates much. still, i keep it as an option. it seems that the best option(among presented) is jackson freestyle. i've seen 2 versions: dj 2190(not sure whether there is a blade installed) and dj 2092 with installed ultima aspire ub25.
edea. i like them the most, but i'm also afraid, that my legs might be too wide for the boots(i know, i know, i should try them on). i am mostly considering edea overture.
risport. i've learned very recently about them, but they seem nice and have various options in the shops here. i haven't researched them as much, so advise about them is especially needed. now stuck with three options:
antares - possibly not enough stiffness;
electra light - could be anything from not enough to overbooting. unfortunately, it's also unclear, whether shops have them;
excellence(i haven't seen them on risport website, so i believe, they aren't made anymore, but, well, shops here have lots of older models) - same as for electra.
golden horse skates. so, the idea is mostly a plan b, but maybe someone would think it isn't that bad. gh is a taiwanese company, that creates semi-custom/custom ice and roller skates(from casual to high-lvl). there aren't many reviews in languages i know, but the ones i've seen are good(for both ice and roller boots). i started considering them because of customised sizing(i know that i don't have more or less "standard" legs) and nice price. but the problem is that you have to measure your legs yourself and can't easily mess up(even with all the instructions). and because of customisation they obviously don't accept returns(they can only make new boots for the shipping price only if size is incorrect. probably doesn't work if you are the one who royally messed up measurements, not sure). i know, that many people bought them and it was good. still, even with good quality of skates themselves, there can be situation, that the boots just aren't "right for you". so i am wary of the idea and only keep it as plan b.


so yeah, i am obviously gonna try on everything i can. but some help with whether my ideas and expectations are correct would be nice. or maybe i should look into something higher/lower level.
(important side-note: for many reasons i would prefer to buy the highest level among what suits me)


2) blades
so, except for the gh skates plan, i have usual options such as jackson ultima, willson and mk. i am definitely not using mark iv/excel/flight, i know, that they aren't good for lessons, just not worth the money. and i know that legacy/coronation ace/professional would be "overblading". so options "in the middle" are jackson mirage, ultima aspire, willson majestic, mk galaxy and mk double star. i know that some work better for certain boots and some worse. but in general, which brand is better at that level and should i buy 7 or 8 rocker as a beginner?


3) what should i buy right away besides skates? skate guards, gloves and things for blades to dry(i don't remember the name) are pretty obvious. but what other accessories i'm definitely gonna need? like padding, for example(and i don't know which is actually necessary). and i'd also like to know about socks. i know that it's important. and i also should do fitting in something i'm gonna skate in. but i cannot skate in my casual ones as they aren't good quality and not high enough.


if you need more information, i'll answer it. if there's any update/important stuff i remember, i'll write it here too. thank you in advance!
 

Elija

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Hi, just an observation on Risport is that they may not be the best option if you have wider calves/ankles. I haven’t worn risport since I was a beginner, and the model I had doesn’t even exist anymore, but I do remember they were very narrow. My friend wears risport currently (higher level than those you are looking at though) and the tongues on hers don’t even meet the sides of the boot, and she is super tiny. I know a lot of people on this forum wear risport though, so hopefully they can chime in one the specific models you mentioned.

I wear Edeas and they are also quite narrow, but haven’t worn anything below chorus, so not sure how overtures fit - the lower level edeas have less padding in the tongue than the higher level ones though, which does mean it will reach further if that makes sense. Jackson may be best for you in therms of fit though.

As you noted though, you will only know for sure once you try them on. You sound like you’re in the right track with the boots you listed. I think anything rated for single jumps would be fine for a beginner adult, probably not much point getting super entry level skates, especially if you will be skating often. Good luck!
 

sandraskates

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 31, 2006
Country
United-States
... I think anything rated for single jumps would be fine for a beginner adult, probably not much point getting super entry level skates, especially if you will be skating often. Good luck!

I agree with Elija's last statement. I don't know the in-depth details about all the boots and blades you mentioned, but I've seen many adults with good intentions buy expensive boots and blades, only to quit when they find out how much time, money, skill, etc. skating requires.
Buy the set that will properly support you now and if you stick with the sport and progress, then start really investing and upgrading your equipment.
Others may not agree with this but it's my .02 cents.

Buy a towel to wipe your blades, soakers to put on after drying them, guards to wear when you need to walk around with your skates on, and gloves. You'll also need a strong bag or case to carry everything.
 

WednesdayMarch

Final Flight
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
Absolutely steer clear of super entry level skates if you want to actually learn how to skate properly. But equally, do not be tempted to overboot. It's one thing wanting the absolute best thing on the market for the job, but the best thing on the market for somebody doing triples is probably the absolute worst thing on the market for you! If you go down the Edea route (after being properly fitted), don't pick anything higher spec than Chorus. Seriously.

As to blades, I don't really know what to advise for an absolute beginner, but I do know that I'd steer well clear of Edea Rotation. Having had the, er, joy of trying them out on a pair of Overtures belonging to a friend, I now know why she's been struggling with two foot turns! I couldn't skate on them at all. They just don't glide. MK Galaxy would be a better bet.
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
As @WednesdayMarch has said, don't get blades and boots for an absolute beginner. MK Galaxy would be your best bet, but if you can't get those, it would be okay for you to use John Wilson Coronation Ace traditional blade, you'd just be in the same blades for a long time as you advanced. Now, hearing your case and your foot/ankle dimensions, I would not suggest you go to Edea. They are going to be way too narrow for you. I would look at Jackson, and Risport, depending on the particular boot and style you are planning on getting some are wider than others. If you want my opinion, Jackson is probably your best bet (Look at Entre). I have heard of the other brand you mentioned, Golden Horse, and that is not a brand I would go for you as a beginner.

And depending on your personal circumstances, you may have to get a semi-custom boot made.

As far as what you need, thin socks (nothing too thick), always have a towel to wipe down your blades and the bottom of your boots when you are ready to change out of skates. Hard skate guards for when you are walking off the ice, and then soakers to put on them when you are done and have them wiped down.

Good luck!
 
Last edited:

jcskates

Rinkside
Joined
Feb 17, 2020
Country
Canada
Im seconding what @Ic3Rabbit mentioned.

Blades: I started on a stock jackson blade but I feel like the aces are great for beginners. The toepicks may seem larger than my old Mark IVs but aces have more of a rocker which takes a little more effort to get to the drag pick (lesser chance to face plant/trip on your toepick). I just wish I started on these blades (got my own issues that are irrelevant to this post but they're great blades).

As for boots, Risport and Jackson are great but if you're looking for support Risport Antares might not be enough. But yeah try on as much boots as you can and you'll know which one is right for you.

Thin long socks or tights for footwear. For me I buy a lot cheap dollarstore gloves to store in my bag just in case I forget my favourite gloves or if a friend needs one, also gloves magically disappear in my rink. Depending on the regulation where you are, you might need a hockey helmet if you are a complete beginner, if you're not then scratch this.
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
Im seconding what @Ic3Rabbit mentioned.

Blades: I started on a stock jackson blade but I feel like the aces are great for beginners. The toepicks may seem larger than my old Mark IVs but aces have more of a rocker which takes a little more effort to get to the drag pick (lesser chance to face plant/trip on your toepick). I just wish I started on these blades (got my own issues that are irrelevant to this post but they're great blades).

As for boots, Risport and Jackson are great but if you're looking for support Risport Antares might not be enough. But yeah try on as much boots as you can and you'll know which one is right for you.

Thin long socks or tights for footwear. For me I buy a lot cheap dollarstore gloves to store in my bag just in case I forget my favourite gloves or if a friend needs one, also gloves magically disappear in my rink. Depending on the regulation where you are, you might need a hockey helmet if you are a complete beginner, if you're not then scratch this.
Regarding the bolded section, I'll advise the same I did earlier in the week to someone is looking at Risport, Electra Light.
 

WednesdayMarch

Final Flight
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
With regard to soakers, make sure you get ones that are at least lined with cotton terry towelling. You need fabric that soaks the water up, not just moves it around. I've seen too many polyester fleecy ones out there. Personally, I prefer them to be entirely made from natural fabrics, so I eschew the ones with sequins (also get nervous with sequins around ice, as I've seen what happens when a blade hits one on the ice) and those that make you look like you've stamped on a small animal....

AND - this is important - when you get home from the rink, take the soakers off and wipe the blades again, leaving both blades and soakers to come up to temperature and - in the case of the soakers - dry completely before you put them back on. Soakers are brilliant but they don't prevent rusting if you leave them on after skating. No matter how thoroughly you feel you've dried your blades, changes in temperature produce condensation and the soakers will just hold that next to the blades.
 

tstop4me

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 2, 2015
With regard to soakers, make sure you get ones that are at least lined with cotton terry towelling. You need fabric that soaks the water up, not just moves it around. I've seen too many polyester fleecy ones out there. Personally, I prefer them to be entirely made from natural fabrics, so I eschew the ones with sequins (also get nervous with sequins around ice, as I've seen what happens when a blade hits one on the ice) and those that make you look like you've stamped on a small animal....

AND - this is important - when you get home from the rink, take the soakers off and wipe the blades again, leaving both blades and soakers to come up to temperature and - in the case of the soakers - dry completely before you put them back on. Soakers are brilliant but they don't prevent rusting if you leave them on after skating. No matter how thoroughly you feel you've dried your blades, changes in temperature produce condensation and the soakers will just hold that next to the blades.
I have two towels and two pairs of soakers. I use the first towel and the first pair of soakers at the rink. When I get back home, I remove the first (used, damp) pair of soakers; dry off the boots and blades thoroughly with the second (fresh, dry) towel; and put on the second (fresh, dry) pair of soakers. I then alternate. The second towel and the second pair of soakers then go off to the rink the next session; and the first towel and first pair of soakers have time to thoroughly dry for the next go-around. The two pairs of towels and soakers are different colors, so they are easy to keep track of.

When storing blades, I like to keep the soakers on, because they provide mechanical protection for the edges. They prevent the blades from banging against each other and dinging up the edges; they prevent the blades from marring soft surfaces (such as wood); and they prevent hard surfaces (such as ceramic tile) from dinging up the edges.

If you have problems with excessive rusting on some plain-carbon steel blades (some blades are more prone to rust than others; and if you keep your skates in a humid room, you're more likely to have problems), then just put a light coat of oil or petroleum jelly on the edges (and toepicks for some blades) before you put on the fresh, dry pair of soakers. It's best not to store your skates in your kit bag, in your car, or in your locker or other closed compartment. Let them breathe.
 
Last edited:
Top