Alysa Liu Ready for Change

Chipewalo

Spectator
Joined
Sep 8, 2020
I feel if everybody taught technique foundation like Elizebeta then quads may take longer but they would be more sustainable with age. Right now you need to jump quad by 15 (or 3A) otherwise you're nothing, and can't make it.

This is why people teach unsustainable quads at such a young age. If senior age limit was hypothetically 17-18, then people would slow the process of teaching quads and start similar teachnique to Elizebeta. They can teach quads like this, but they won't as otherwise their skaters won't succeed.

Alysa Liu is talented enough to land quads at an older age, but her technqiue is not suited for this. If her coach taught her differently she'd be in a great position to learn quads properly and keep them for longer. Even like Rika Kihira or Wakaba (I feel both have potential to learn a quad).
I'm not a skater, but from a strictly logical standpoint, how does anyone know that teaching quads differently to young skaters will result in sustainability? Only very young female skaters are performing quads and that's over the last couple of years. There's no database, no body of knowledge for saying what is sustainable technique and what's not. The so-called "unsustainable" technique is the only way that's worked.

It will be wonderful if someone like Elizaveta can learn a quad at her age and sustain it. Then we'll have an example from which to start a discussion.
 

kolyadafan2002

Fan of Kolyada
Final Flight
Joined
Jun 6, 2019
I'm not a skater, but from a strictly logical standpoint, how does anyone know that teaching quads differently to young skaters will result in sustainability? Only very young female skaters are performing quads and that's over the last couple of years. There's no database, no body of knowledge for saying what is sustainable technique and what's not. The so-called "unsustainable" technique is the only way that's worked.

It will be wonderful if someone like Elizaveta can learn a quad at her age and sustain it. Then we'll have an example from which to start a discussion.
For a start, relying on throwing a weaker upper body is unsustainable, but using more leg strength and having a strong and stable upper body is more sustainable (albeit harder to generate power).

Rika Kihira, although young uses a lot of leg strength and doesn't throw her upper body around. Trusova is in-between (uses her upper body more than Rika, but less than sherbakova).

Of course this is just one aspect of sustainable technique, but just an example that popped into my head
 

Charlotte 71

On the Ice
Joined
Oct 27, 2005
I'm not a skater, but from a strictly logical standpoint, how does anyone know that teaching quads differently to young skaters will result in sustainability? Only very young female skaters are performing quads and that's over the last couple of years. There's no database, no body of knowledge for saying what is sustainable technique and what's not. The so-called "unsustainable" technique is the only way that's worked.

It will be wonderful if someone like Elizaveta can learn a quad at her age and sustain it. Then we'll have an example from which to start a discussion.

But I think Elizaveta will always be an outlier because she learned the triple Axel at 12. It's not a quad, but it probably prepared her for the approximate demands of rotating a quad far more than triples would have.
 

axelanika

Rinkside
Joined
Oct 31, 2020
Country
United-States
For a start, relying on throwing a weaker upper body is unsustainable, but using more leg strength and having a strong and stable upper body is more sustainable (albeit harder to generate power).
How do we know this? Yes, we don't have many figure skaters who are in higher ages who perform quads but the vast majority of these skaters never learned quads. However, in the case of triples, watching 1960's figure skating, you will see jump technique using arms in a similar fashion to Trusova and Shcherbakova for triples and even doubles. Of course, this technique has been erased now and you won't see it in men's quads (even Kurt Brownings), but I thought it would be interesting to mention.
 
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