Edea roller vs ice boots | Golden Skate

Edea roller vs ice boots

flyinghigh010

Spectator
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Beginner adult here, took a few figure skating lessons as a kid but pretty much starting anew since January this year.

I got fitted for figure skates and the Edea Chorus fit me really well. I am looking to get some inline frames mounted so I can continue practicing over the summer as rinks are closed where I live. However, I'm thinking it's a bit steep to get 2 pairs of the Chorus (1 for ice and 1 for roller), and my pro shop is completely sold out of the more beginner level skates. I'm 55 kg, 165 cm, learning crossovers, edges, waltz jumps.

I'm wondering if anyone has any advice for if I should just take the plunge with the Chorus, or if I am looking online anyways, if a roller-specific Edea boot might work better for inline off-ice skating. All I have managed to find out about the differences is that the Roller boots have ventilation holes and a nylon sole. Are they also lighter to compensate for the weight of rollers? I don't want to change the boots too much from ice, to try to maximize transfer of skills to the ice, so are the roller boots similar enough in feel to the ice boots?
Also, has anyone tried interchanging blades and frames on their skates and is this reasonable to do 2x a year (i.e. to blades for the winter, and rollers for the summer)? I am thinking if this is reasonably easy to do, maybe I could just get the 1 pair of boots to use for both.
 

Ameliaskates

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 10, 2021
I'm not very experienced in roller skating but you will need a seperate boot for your ice blades and frames. Continually swapping from blade to roller frame weakens the sole of your boot and just isn't safe.
 

sandraskates

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 31, 2006
Country
United-States
As Ameliaskates said, you don't want to continually swap between blade and rollers.
You need a separate set of inline skates. The boot does not have to be the same as your figure skates. I have noticed that boot makers create a different line for roller skaters but I'm not familiar with the differences.

The prices on complete sets of inline, and more specificcally Pic-type skates (that have similar rocker to ice blades) have come down since they peaked last year. I suggest looking online on eBay or skating suppliers and buy yourself a ready made set.

Edited to add: Complete set = boot with inline rollers already mounted.
 

gliese

On the Ice
Joined
Oct 31, 2020
Country
United-States
Coming in to add that if your boots don't last more than a year or so, then switching them out might be okay because you'd really only be doing it once on each boot.
 

WednesdayMarch

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
Boots that are made specifically for rollers are made for quads. They are not suitable for inlines. The reason for this is that quads are far more stable than inlines and quad skaters don't need anywhere near as much support. Please do not put quad roller boots on inlines.

My advice on this would be absolutely go with the Chorus. It's far, far easier to progress and swap between ice and inlines if you have the same feet on both, if you see what I mean. If another pair of brand new Chorus is a step too far in money, do look for a second hand pair as they turn up when teenagers grow out of them.
 

Elija

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Boots that are made specifically for rollers are made for quads. They are not suitable for inlines. The reason for this is that quads are far more stable than inlines and quad skaters don't need anywhere near as much support. Please do not put quad roller boots on inlines.

My advice on this would be absolutely go with the Chorus. It's far, far easier to progress and swap between ice and inlines if you have the same feet on both, if you see what I mean. If another pair of brand new Chorus is a step too far in money, do look for a second hand pair as they turn up when teenagers grow out of them.
Agree - pays to go up in stiffness rather than down for inline figure skates. I made the mistake of using an old pair of skates that were less stiff than my ice skates. Fine if you’re just mucking around, but if you want to seriously practice and do turns, jumps, spins (lol, so hard on wheels) etc it would pay to get boots the same or stiffer for off ice.
 

flyinghigh010

Spectator
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Thanks everyone for all the helpful advice and suggestions! That makes so much sense that roller boots are made for quads.

I'll follow your advice and look for a used set online. I've found a set of lightly used Chorus with blades in my size on ebay so hopefully it works out! Then I can just buy the one pair of boots new to use just for inlines.
 

Crystal Rainbows

Spectator
Joined
Dec 16, 2020
Boots that are made specifically for rollers are made for quads. They are not suitable for inlines. The reason for this is that quads are far more stable than inlines and quad skaters don't need anywhere near as much support. Please do not put quad roller boots on inlines.

My advice on this would be absolutely go with the Chorus. It's far, far easier to progress and swap between ice and inlines if you have the same feet on both, if you see what I mean. If another pair of brand new Chorus is a step too far in money, do look for a second hand pair as they turn up when teenagers grow out of them.

As an artistic quad skater who skated at a high level - I'd argue we absolutely need the support for anything beyond an axel (I was using the same Wifa boots my ice skating friend was using while we were working on doubles).

Personally, I would go with the same boot you are comfortable in on the ice for the inlines. My pro has a thing about switching both blade & boot at the same time. He thinks it just makes your skate time miserable because there is nothing familiar. I believe he's right as I had him put old Coronation Ace blades on my Jackson Fusions this winter after 2 month of miserable skating thinking it was the boots or me or who knows what. First day on the Aces I was able to jump and do twizzles again with no problems! YEYYYY

Jackson is releasing an inline figure blade next week called mirage that mimics an 8ft rocker and the mounting plate is made in the exact shape of their ice blades with the intention to be able to switch between inline and ice blades and not need to make new holes in your soles. I haven't seen them yet, but the price point is good enough that I signed up for a pair at my local shop and plan to buy new boots which will be my ice boots come fall. I guess I'll find out if it's a viable option to switch out again in spring 2022!
 

gliese

On the Ice
Joined
Oct 31, 2020
Country
United-States
As an artistic quad skater who skated at a high level - I'd argue we absolutely need the support for anything beyond an axel (I was using the same Wifa boots my ice skating friend was using while we were working on doubles).
This does not change the fact that you should NEVER mount a roller boot to inline skaters as they are designed for quads which are inherently more stable. Just because you need support on quads does not mean you need it in the same way. Boots that are designed for quads aren't going to give you support you don't need because it's a waste of their time and money.
 

Crystal Rainbows

Spectator
Joined
Dec 16, 2020
This does not change the fact that you should NEVER mount a roller boot to inline skaters as they are designed for quads which are inherently more stable. Just because you need support on quads does not mean you need it in the same way. Boots that are designed for quads aren't going to give you support you don't need because it's a waste of their time and money.
You missed my point - many artistic roller skaters use the exact same boots as ice skaters - I have switched my boots between the 3 without issue and have experience in both areas.

Boots designed for quads will in fact give you the same support - the main difference with something like the Edea has to do with ventilation and a reinforcement in the sole to support the weight of the skate plate. The boot portions are the same. In fact, Edea makes many models the same for both ice and roller (for example the ice fly is called the fly) and the sole is the difference NOT the support in the boot. I know this from personally speaking with Edea and their reps. The roller boots will work fine for inline and the ice boots will as well.
I would think the roller boot might even be better due to the seasonal difference and the ventilation.

Hope that makes things more clear.
 
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