Fantasy Books

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Margaret Mahy: "Shock Forest and Other Stories" - Five magical & marvellous short stories: 'The House of Coloured Windows', 'Rooms to Let', 'Shock Forest', 'The Bridge Builder' and 'The Travelling Boy and the Stay-at-Home Bird'.

Our street had a lot of little houses on either side of it where we children lived happily with our families. There were rows of lawns, like green napkins tucked under the houses' chins, and letterboxes, apple trees and marigolds. Children played up and down the street, laughing and shouting and sometimes crying, for it is the way of the world that things should be mixed. In the soft autumn evenings, before the winter winds began, the smoke from chimneys rose up in threads of grey and blue, stitching our houses into the autumn air.
But there was one house in our street that was different from all the rest, and that was the wizard's house. For one thing there was a door knocker of iron in the shape of a dog's head that looked at us as we ran by. Of course, the wizard's house had its lawn too, but no apple trees or marigolds, only a silver tree with a golden parrot in it. But that was not the most wonderful thing about the wizard's house.
The real wonders of the wizard's house were its windows. They were all the colours of the world - red, blue, green, gold, purple and pink, violet and yelllow, as well as the reddish-brown of autumn leaves. His house was patched all over with coloured windows. And there was not just one pink window or one green one, either, but several of each colour, each one different. No one had told us but we all knew that if you looked through the red window you saw a red world. If you looked through the blue window, a blue one. The wizard could go into any of these worlds whenever he wished. He was not only the owner of many windows, but the master of many worlds.


 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Neil Gaiman: "Coraline" - Atmospheric & creepy.
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
David Drake: "Mistress of the Catacombs" - The fourth book in the Lord of the Isles series (which began with "Lord of the Isles"). I enjoyed spending time with some of my favourite characters again.
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
J K Rowling: "The Tales of Beedle the Bard"

From the Introduction:

The Tales of Beedle the Bard is a collection of stories written for young wizards and witches. They have been popular bedtime reading for centuries, with the result that the Hopping Pot and the Fountain of Fair Fortune are as familiar to the students at Hogwarts as Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty are to Muggle (non-magical) children.
Beedle's stories resemble our fairy tales in many respects; for instance, virtue is usually rewarded and wickedness punished. However, there is one very obvious difference. In Muggle fairy tales, magic tends to lie at the root of the hero or heroine's troubles - the wicked witch has poisoned the apple, or put the princess into a hundred years' sleep, or turned the prince into a hideous beast. In The Tales of Beedle the Bard, on the other hand, we meet heroes and heroines who can perform magic themselves, and yet find it just as hard to solve their problems as we do. Beedle's stories have helped generations of wizarding parents to explain this painful fact of life to their young children: that magic causes as much trouble as it cures.
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Jane Lindskold: "Through Wolf's Eyes" - The first book in the series. Firekeeper was brought up by a pack of wolves after her parents died in a fire that also wiped out the settlement they were part of. She has no recollection of her human past, except in dreams that she forgets upon waking. Now, ten years later, she again encounters humans and must relearn human ways, including human speech. Also to navigate the intricacies and intrigues of court life.

Note: It is believed that she might be the lost granddaughter of the king - but the reader learns otherwise.
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Terry Pratchett: "Snuff" - Sam Vimes is very reluctantly dragged away on holiday to the countryside - where he expects to be bored out of his skull. However, as it turns out, there is crime in the countryside as well...
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Sean Russell: "The One Kingdom" - The first book in the Swans' War trilogy. For centuries the land has been divided by the enmity between the Renné and the Wills.

That was how it seemed to her: Each family was at war with the other's ancestors, those who had perpetrated the "great injustice" upon the other. The fact that it was not the present Renné or Wills made no difference. There was the perennial, unerasable injustice of the past and it must be engaged in mortal combat at all costs. If war was not, at present, possible, then the tournament would make a reasonable substitute.
Why the people of Ayr would ever want to be ruled by families so stupid she could not understand. But then that was exactly the point: they did not want to be ruled by them. It was only a myth of the two families, who could no more give up the injustices of the past - their precious injustices - than they would surrender the dream of restoration in the future. The ultimate victory over their rivals - restoration. Better even than the utter annihilation of the other. Just let them ascend the throne again, with the other family there to witness. It would make centuries of warfare and uncounted dead seem a small price - it would be worth that ten times over.


But there is an evil stirring - more ancient even than the hatred between the Renné and the Wills.
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Mercedes Lackey: "The Fire Rose" - A Beauty & the Beast retelling set in turn-of-the-century San Fransisco.
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Andre Norton & Sasha Miller: "A Crown Disowned" - The third book in the Cycle of Oak, Yew, Ash and Rowan (the first book was "To the King a Daughter".) While invaders threaten Rendel from without, there is intrigue and treachery within.
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Margaret Mahy: "The Blood-and-Thunder Adventure on Hurricane Peak"

Most stories start in one place and then go in all directions, but the strange tale of the blood-and-thunder events on Hurricane Peak began in every direction and ended in one place, and that one place was Hurricane Peak itself.


An adventure involving a wicked industrialist & his adopted Aunt, his two villainish henchmen, a postman, a magician & a scientist, two school inspectors, and the pupils of the Unexpected School, including Huxley Hammond and his sister, Zaza.

And two cats - Tango and Zanzibar.:)
 

elbkup

Medalist
Joined
Mar 3, 2015
Messages
1,927
Country
United-States
In honor of Ursula K Leguin would like to recommend LANGUAGE OF THE NIGHT, a book of her essays, some of her poetry, and addendums or updates to some of her best stories... it is one of the best introductions to her writings, point of view, standards and ideals. It is a work I return to time and again; it grounds and centers my emotional and intellectual world.
 

lyverbird1

Final Flight
Joined
Apr 18, 2015
Messages
593
Anyone else read Sarah J. Maas's Throne of Glass series? I'm a few books in and enjoying it very much. Very excited to hear Hulu have picked up the option on producing a TV series based on the book series!
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Caroline Stevermer: "When the King Comes Home"

One day, all well-meant promises would be made good; that's what it meant, when I was a child, to say "When the king comes home." Wishes granted. Dreams made real.
I never hear the phrase used any more. No one refers to it. It is as if it has been lost to all memory save mine, vanished away, like the bits of some broken spell, some prophecy fulfilled. When the king comes home.
 

50 Words for Snow

On the Ice
Joined
Apr 30, 2018
Messages
364
I read the first several Wheel of Time books, and liked them, but the series got way too long, and the books seemed to get a bit more repetitive, so eventually I quit reading the series.
That's too bad. It picks up again in the last four books or so, and the ending is worth it.

That's what I'm afraid of; the series is, what, 14 books? :drama:
Yes, but it's worth it.

But at least you won't have to wait years between insallments - like some of us had to. Also, the length of the series is no problem if you don't actually like it - you can always quit.;)
Haha The struggle was real, wasn't it?
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
Haha The struggle was real, wasn't it?

"Crossroads of Twilight".... That thing was a pain - when half the book went back over the same period of time. After having waited those years, and then having to wait years again for the next one... I was not amused.;)

It wasn't at all as bad - or frustrating - when I did a re-read of everything after having read the last book. I did take that into consideration, and withheld final judgement even when I first read it, but, still, at the time... Not. Happy.;)
 

50 Words for Snow

On the Ice
Joined
Apr 30, 2018
Messages
364
"Crossroads of Twilight".... That thing was a pain - when half the book went back over the same period of time. After having waited those years, and then having to wait years again for the next one... I was not amused.;)

It wasn't at all as bad - or frustrating - when I did a re-read of everything after having read the last book. I did take that into consideration, and withheld final judgement even when I first read it, but, still, at the time... Not. Happy.;)

I started the series in 2006, right after Knife of Dreams was released in hardcover, so I didn't have to wait as often as earlier fans did, but I endured the uncertainty and the long wait after his death, then the short waits between the final books, and like most fans, I liked some of what Sanderson did and disliked some of it too, so after the wait came bittersweet resolution, but I still loved the series and read it again. I also spent years and years on Dragonmount.com discussing the books and other things, and I absorbed some of the pain of other peoples' waiting periods, so I understand, even though I only caught the tail end of it myself.

I had no trouble with CoT the first time I read the series, but I bogged down on it during my re-read before The Gathering Storm and went into that book without re-reading KoD. After that, I have basically skipped over CoT. The last time through, I listened on audiobook, and I just skipped all the chapters that I didn't want to listen to. I think I listened to a 30-some-hour book in an afternoon. :laugh:
 

LRK

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
8,644
I started the series in 2006, right after Knife of Dreams was released in hardcover, so I didn't have to wait as often as earlier fans did, but I endured the uncertainty and the long wait after his death, then the short waits between the final books, and like most fans, I liked some of what Sanderson did and disliked some of it too, so after the wait came bittersweet resolution, but I still loved the series and read it again. I also spent years and years on Dragonmount.com discussing the books and other things, and I absorbed some of the pain of other peoples' waiting periods, so I understand, even though I only caught the tail end of it myself.

I had no trouble with CoT the first time I read the series, but I bogged down on it during my re-read before The Gathering Storm and went into that book without re-reading KoD. After that, I have basically skipped over CoT. The last time through, I listened on audiobook, and I just skipped all the chapters that I didn't want to listen to. I think I listened to a 30-some-hour book in an afternoon. :laugh:

1996. So I wasn't in on the beginning - when I started the first six books were out, and I got them all. The funny thing is that I'd got into my head - I don't know how or why, I just assumed - that it was the entirety of the series. But when I had 400 or so pages of "Lord of Chaos" left to go, I knew there was no way this author could finish the whole series in that amount of pages, and I peeked at the end to confirm that... well, wasn't The End.:)

"Knife of Dreams" - You were lucky.:) That brought to an end a certain plotline - you know the one, I hope; I'm being unspecific for fear of spoilers for those who haven't read the series - I'd waited seven years to be resolved. At least on a re-read - or if reading the whole series - one needn't wait seven years to get to the end of that one.;)

Brandon Sanderson. I think he did well. The thing was that I went into the books he'd written knowing full well that it wouldn't be the same, so I wasn't disappointed. I also knew that he wasn't going to try to copy RJ stylistically, so I was prepared for that as well. The choice wasn't between RJ finishing it or Sanderson finishing it, after all - the choice was between Sanderson and no ending at all.
 

50 Words for Snow

On the Ice
Joined
Apr 30, 2018
Messages
364
1996. So I wasn't in on the beginning - when I started the first six books were out, and I got them all. The funny thing is that I'd got into my head - I don't know how or why, I just assumed - that it was the entirety of the series. But when I had 400 or so pages of "Lord of Chaos" left to go, I knew there was no way this author could finish the whole series in that amount of pages, and I peeked at the end to confirm that... well, wasn't The End.:)

"Knife of Dreams" - You were lucky.:) That brought to an end a certain plotline - you know the one, I hope; I'm being unspecific for fear of spoilers for those who haven't read the series - I'd waited seven years to be resolved. At least on a re-read - or if reading the whole series - one needn't wait seven years to get to the end of that one.;)

Brandon Sanderson. I think he did well. The thing was that I went into the books he'd written knowing full well that it wouldn't be the same, so I wasn't disappointed. I also knew that he wasn't going to try to copy RJ stylistically, so I was prepared for that as well. The choice wasn't between RJ finishing it or Sanderson finishing it, after all - the choice was between Sanderson and no ending at all.

Right. Overall, I'm happy with what Sanderson did. I thought he ruined a couple of characters, but I also thought he took one or two to new heights, and the books he gave us were far superior to a synopsis from Harriet would have been. I have since gone on to read lots of Sanderson's books, and when I met him at a signing, I only praised him for what I liked about his contribution to WoT, rather than scolding him for the things I didn't like. It was too late by then anyway, you know? He can't go back and change it. Why tell him he did it wrong?

Yes, that plotline should have wrapped up much sooner than it did. I don't think anyone really liked that plotline, at least not for as long as it drug on. Sanderson made quick work of what little remained of it, too. It's like he'd had more than enough, himself. :laugh:
 
Top