Incorrect mounting

alexat

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Hi guys, I posted here a couple of months ago. To briefly summarize, I purchased a pair of Edea ice flys, I previously had Jackson's. I could not skate in the edea's at all. The first time I stepped on the ice I knew something was wrong. I could not get on the outside edge, and I was skating on my inside edge. It was difficult to even get on the flat of the blade. Two coaches said they weren't mounted properly, the skate tech put all the screws in - complete nightmare. I had the holes plugged by a different skate tech and had them remounted. The new skate tech said my boots looked funny, that they were "twisted" and "not sitting right". I've had the blades re positioned a few times now and they aren't getting better. I literally can only do swizzles because I'm constantly on the inside edge. I'm struggling to do a two foot glide because I can't skate on the flat of the blades. I've contacted the edea supplier and haven't gotten a response yet, and I am totally stressing out because it was such an expensive purchase.

Before anyone criticizes me for over booting (I can barely do singles), I would just really love some opinions to put my mind at ease. I've been told by a few skaters that it's normal to be on your inside edge and have your ankles roll inwards with edeas until your ankles strengthen. My ankles naturally roll in a tad, but in order for me to get on the flat of the blade with my current skates, I literally have to roll my ankles outwards and point my knees outwards (this doesn't seem right? I don't think my ankles are that bad???). I understand that different boots work for different people, but something seems seriously wrong if I can barely get off the inside edge and onto the flat of the blade.

Can the boots be possibly defective and causing this (like my skate tech and coaches said), or is it my ankles fault and should I switch brands? Any help/advice would be appreciated!!!
 

Sam L

Medalist
Joined
Mar 23, 2014
Omg what a nightmare. I think overbooting is the last of your problems right now. Firstly you shouldn’t put too many holes in before you’re sure that the mounting is correct. Second, I’ve never been in Edeas but it doesn’t sound right that you’re supposed to be on the inside edge. Can you do a one foot glide on the flat? If not it doesn’t sound right. It’s the mounting that’s not right.
 

alexat

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Omg what a nightmare. I think overbooting is the last of your problems right now. Firstly you shouldn’t put too many holes in before you’re sure that the mounting is correct. Second, I’ve never been in Edeas but it doesn’t sound right that you’re supposed to be on the inside edge. Can you do a one foot glide on the flat? If not it doesn’t sound right. It’s the mounting that’s not right.

Thank you for your reply! I only have the temporary screws in at the moment so nothing is permanent. I literally cannot do a one foot glide for more than a second because it's on the inside edge. I can't get on the flat unless I majorly roll my ankles out. It is so frustrating. The woman who mounted my skates said that she can't mount them properly if the boots are that uneven :(
 

tstop4me

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 2, 2015
Can the boots be possibly defective and causing this (like my skate tech and coaches said), or is it my ankles fault and should I switch brands? Any help/advice would be appreciated!!!
Assuming you've addressed other potential issues such as footbeds and blade placement (you have, correct?), if you've got a skate tech and more than one coach telling you the boot is defective, you should follow up on that with Edea. Most boot makers have a warranty of X months against manufacturing defects. See what Edea's policy is, and find out how you would go about filing a claim (you mentioned in your previous thread that you bought them online, not through your tech).

With traditional leather soles and heels, if the mounting surface is slightly off, some techs can correct it with a belt sander. Not sure that's viable with Edeas, since they have a thin, carbon-fiber sole.

Assuming (a) you confirm the boots are defective, (b) they are out of warranty, and (c) they can't be sanded, it may be possible to correct the mounting via shims between the blade and sole or heel. Again, with traditional leather soles and heels, this can be done, though it may require longer screws (readily available) in some instances, depending on the specific shims needed. Once again, though, you may have problems with Edeas, because they use custom screws. Their website lists only one standard length. You'll need to contact them to find out whether longer screws are available on special order, if needed.
 

Tavi...

Record Breaker
Joined
Feb 10, 2014
Hi guys, I posted here a couple of months ago. To briefly summarize, I purchased a pair of Edea ice flys, I previously had Jackson's. I could not skate in the edea's at all. The first time I stepped on the ice I knew something was wrong. I could not get on the outside edge, and I was skating on my inside edge. It was difficult to even get on the flat of the blade. Two coaches said they weren't mounted properly, the skate tech put all the screws in - complete nightmare. I had the holes plugged by a different skate tech and had them remounted. The new skate tech said my boots looked funny, that they were "twisted" and "not sitting right". I've had the blades re positioned a few times now and they aren't getting better. I literally can only do swizzles because I'm constantly on the inside edge. I'm struggling to do a two foot glide because I can't skate on the flat of the blades. I've contacted the edea supplier and haven't gotten a response yet, and I am totally stressing out because it was such an expensive purchase.

Before anyone criticizes me for over booting (I can barely do singles), I would just really love some opinions to put my mind at ease. I've been told by a few skaters that it's normal to be on your inside edge and have your ankles roll inwards with edeas until your ankles strengthen. My ankles naturally roll in a tad, but in order for me to get on the flat of the blade with my current skates, I literally have to roll my ankles outwards and point my knees outwards (this doesn't seem right? I don't think my ankles are that bad???). I understand that different boots work for different people, but something seems seriously wrong if I can barely get off the inside edge and onto the flat of the blade.

Can the boots be possibly defective and causing this (like my skate tech and coaches said), or is it my ankles fault and should I switch brands? Any help/advice would be appreciated!!!

If I recall, in the past year or so, there have been quite a few reports on this forum and others of defective Edea boots. Whether that’s your problem or not I can’t say, but it sounds like it could be. Since Edea is not responding, I would contact the shop you bought them from and explain the problem. If they agree that the boots are defective (which they should have checked before they ever mounted the blades) ask them to work with Edea to get you a refund or replacement. I personally would not waste any more time trying other solutions because if the boots are in fact defective, there is probably nothing you can do to fix the problem entirely.
 

alexat

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Assuming you've addressed other potential issues such as footbeds and blade placement (you have, correct?), if you've got a skate tech and more than one coach telling you the boot is defective, you should follow up on that with Edea. Most boot makers have a warranty of X months against manufacturing defects. See what Edea's policy is, and find out how you would go about filing a claim (you mentioned in your previous thread that you bought them online, not through your tech).

With traditional leather soles and heels, if the mounting surface is slightly off, some techs can correct it with a belt sander. Not sure that's viable with Edeas, since they have a thin, carbon-fiber sole.

Assuming (a) you confirm the boots are defective, (b) they are out of warranty, and (c) they can't be sanded, it may be possible to correct the mounting via shims between the blade and sole or heel. Again, with traditional leather soles and heels, this can be done, though it may require longer screws (readily available) in some instances, depending on the specific shims needed. Once again, though, you may have problems with Edeas, because they use custom screws. Their website lists only one standard length. You'll need to contact them to find out whether longer screws are available on special order, if needed.

My tech has addressed all the other issues, and my town only has one skate store and they don't stock edeas so I had to buy them online, but the online store is an authorized dealer. I'm definitely going to contact edea, because the online store sort of made it sound like that it is impossible for my boots to be defective. Thank you for the info!
 

alexat

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
If I recall, in the past year or so, there have been quite a few reports on this forum and others of defective Edea boots. Whether that’s your problem or not I can’t say, but it sounds like it could be. Since Edea is not responding, I would contact the shop you bought them from and explain the problem. If they agree that the boots are defective (which they should have checked before they ever mounted the blades) ask them to work with Edea to get you a refund or replacement. I personally would not waste any more time trying other solutions because if the boots are in fact defective, there is probably nothing you can do to fix the problem entirely.

My skate tech literally said the same thing (re not wasting anymore time because the boots are defective). I had them mounted by a skate tech in my town, not by the store I bought them from. The first response I got from the store when I told them of the issue sounded skeptical, they sort of made it seem as though defective boots aren't a thing. Someone else at my rink is having the exact same problem with their new ice flys as well. Thanks for letting me know about the reports of defects.
 

Tavi...

Record Breaker
Joined
Feb 10, 2014
My skate tech literally said the same thing (re not wasting anymore time because the boots are defective). I had them mounted by a skate tech in my town, not by the store I bought them from. The first response I got from the store when I told them of the issue sounded skeptical, they sort of made it seem as though defective boots aren't a thing. Someone else at my rink is having the exact same problem with their new ice flys as well. Thanks for letting me know about the reports of defects.

Good luck and let us know how things work out!

My suggestions:

Be sure to keep records of each time you call or email the distributor - date, what you discussed, name of who you spoke to, etc., and their response (even if it’s that they never called you back or answered your email). Keep a little file or folder.

If you want to tell them that you’ve heard reports of defects, I’d suggest searching threads on this forum and others, such as this one, for comments about Edeas:

http://skatingforums.com/index.php?board=25.0

If they seem useful, print them out. The mentions of defects may not be in titles. For example, see post 13 in this 2018 thread:

https://skatingforums.com/index.php?topic=7964.0

If anyone else is mentioning similar problems to yours, that may be especially useful to you.

If Edea don’t respond to calls or emails, try contacting the shop or Edea distributor on Twitter. I sometimes find that companies (like airlines) are more responsive to complaints on Twitter.

One last thing: at many competitions, Edea distributors have a booth, so if all else fails, you might be able to talk to one of them face to face that way.
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
This is an EDEA problem, and most likely a defective or misformed boot, you need to proceed with contacting them and keeping record of all interactions with them until they correct it.
 

thesoundofice

Rinkside
Joined
May 15, 2018
Hi,
Maybe it is a stupid question but I must ask you. Were you fitted correctly? After reading your post, just out of curiosity, I decided to try on a pair of Edea slightly bigger than mine. I'm in 255 D and I tried 260 C. While my friend can skate perfectly in them, I had the same trouble and feeling you have. In addition to widht problems ,it was very difficult for me to get an outside edge as my ankles kept rolling inward. I really struggled finding the right balance and had a weird feeling in the heel area. I don't have this problem with my boots. I'm aware of the fact that it takes time to adapt after the switch because Edeas really challenge your ankle's strenght,but it's s not that terrible.
If correct sizing is not an issue, then the boots are defective and the only thing you can really do is contacting Edea and try to get a refund or another pair of boots.
 

alexat

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Hi,
Maybe it is a stupid question but I must ask you. Were you fitted correctly? After reading your post, just out of curiosity, I decided to try on a pair of Edea slightly bigger than mine. I'm in 255 D and I tried 260 C. While my friend can skate perfectly in them, I had the same trouble and feeling you have. In addition to widht problems ,it was very difficult for me to get an outside edge as my ankles kept rolling inward. I really struggled finding the right balance and had a weird feeling in the heel area. I don't have this problem with my boots. I'm aware of the fact that it takes time to adapt after the switch because Edeas really challenge your ankle's strenght,but it's s not that terrible.
If correct sizing is not an issue, then the boots are defective and the only thing you can really do is contacting Edea and try to get a refund or another pair of boots.

Not a stupid question, and thanks for the response! Part of this nightmare is that because I live in a small town, there's barely any options for boots. I had my foot measured by a coach who had an edea measurement tool and she recommended 270, the authorised online retailer suggested 265. I went with 265, they are pretty snug length wise, my toes nearly hit the end. I tried on size 260 in concerto though and they were just too small, my toes were hitting the end (not sure if the size varies by the style of boot?).

I went to the rink today and had two people try my skates on and they had the exact same problem as me, so I think I can rule my ankles out as being the problem. I tried to really focus on what was going wrong with my skates so that I can explain it better to the store I got them from, but when I twist my knee/ankle out into an unnatural position to try and get on the flat of the blade, the blade sort of drags and wants to go inwards instead of straight forward (hence me not being able to even do a two foot glide for long). I brought my first pair of skates along with me to see if it was me that was the problem, and I could skate just fine in my old Jackson Mystiques.

I know some people have mentioned absolutely making sure it isn't a mounting issue, but my skate tech said if the boots are defective shifting the blade again and again cannot fix it. Another thing I noticed is that when I try to get on the flat of the blade and point my skate forwards (when I skate forward, it is as if my boot doesn't want to face that direction), I get this pain in my arch, not sure if that is relevant.
 

tstop4me

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 2, 2015
To alexat: If you want to make headway with the distributor who sold you the boots or with Edea, you need to change your approach. You need to demonstrate that the boots per se are defective. That is, that your skating woes are not caused by weak ankles, foot abnormalities, wrong size, improper mounting of the blades, defective blades, or defective sharpening of the blades ... or any other cause not related to the boots themselves. Your first skate tech should have checked them out prior to the first mounting; but apparently not. What you now need to do is have your current skate tech demount the blades completely. Then she can place the boots on a flat surface and take photos from various angles. Then she should turn the boots with the soles and heels facing up, place a straight edge across different sections and at different orientations, and take various photos. These should document the defects in the boots per se. [Of course, the response from the distributor or Edea could be that the first skate tech damaged them by a really improper mounting; but let's see how how receptive they are first.]
 

alexat

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
To alexat: If you want to make headway with the distributor who sold you the boots or with Edea, you need to change your approach. You need to demonstrate that the boots per se are defective. That is, that your skating woes are not caused by weak ankles, foot abnormalities, wrong size, improper mounting of the blades, defective blades, or defective sharpening of the blades ... or any other cause not related to the boots themselves. Your first skate tech should have checked them out prior to the first mounting; but apparently not. What you now need to do is have your current skate tech demount the blades completely. Then she can place the boots on a flat surface and take photos from various angles. Then she should turn the boots with the soles and heels facing up, place a straight edge across different sections and at different orientations, and take various photos. These should document the defects in the boots per se. [Of course, the response from the distributor or Edea could be that the first skate tech damaged them by a really improper mounting; but let's see how how responsive they are.]

Thank you for the advice, I will get onto it asap. Although I really hope the latter doesn't happen (first skate tech damaged them), and that they are responsive.
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Probably not super helpful but my first pair of Edea boots were also defective. They were motivos, and the heel on the right boot was misaligned. I was fine for skating forwards (although it was difficult for several reasons; they hadn't been mounted in the right spot for my feet, and they were also one size too big) but skating backwards was literally impossible. My coach would watch me try to do a straight backwards glide on my right foot, and even if I was leaning to the outside, I would curve inwards. I probably could have raised a fuss with the manufacturer but at that point it had been so, so long with me dealing with various boot problems that I didn't want to lose any more time. I bought a new pair from a skate tech trusted by my coach, and my new pair is WONDERFUL. It would probably help you if your coaches or skate tech could tell you exactly WHAT about the skate they think is defective--but it could be the heel alignment, I was told that was a (recent) common problem by my skate tech.
 

alexat

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Your boots definitely sound defective, but just so you know, boots aren't necessarily too small if your toes touch the front. :) It's a matter of personal preference. Some people can't stand it, while I can't stand my toes not touching the front of my boots.

Thanks for thinking they could be defective, the edea dealer is making it sound like there's no such thing as defective boots. About the size though - with the next size down, my toes weren't just touching the end, they were also curling to fit in so I think they were too small.
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
Your boots definitely sound defective, but just so you know, boots aren't necessarily too small if your toes touch the front. :) It's a matter of personal preference. Some people can't stand it, while I can't stand my toes not touching the front of my boots.

Yes, yes they are if they touch the front. This is not proper fitting if they touch the front, that means they are too small. You risk injury.

To ever have a proper fitted boot, you are going to have to get over wanting the feeling of your toes touching the tip of the inside of your boots.
 

alexat

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Probably not super helpful but my first pair of Edea boots were also defective. They were motivos, and the heel on the right boot was misaligned. I was fine for skating forwards (although it was difficult for several reasons; they hadn't been mounted in the right spot for my feet, and they were also one size too big) but skating backwards was literally impossible. My coach would watch me try to do a straight backwards glide on my right foot, and even if I was leaning to the outside, I would curve inwards. I probably could have raised a fuss with the manufacturer but at that point it had been so, so long with me dealing with various boot problems that I didn't want to lose any more time. I bought a new pair from a skate tech trusted by my coach, and my new pair is WONDERFUL. It would probably help you if your coaches or skate tech could tell you exactly WHAT about the skate they think is defective--but it could be the heel alignment, I was told that was a (recent) common problem by my skate tech.

Thanks for letting me know of the defect, currently emailing the edea dealer and they are not responding well to me saying my coach thinks the boot is defective, they said that NEVER happens.
 

DanseMacabre

Final Flight
Joined
May 27, 2018
Country
Iceland
Thanks for letting me know of the defect, currently emailing the edea dealer and they are not responding well to me saying my coach thinks the boot is defective, they said that NEVER happens.

Any manufacturing process can produce defects. Sounds like they're trying to avoid dealing with the problem by denying there is one. Definitely follow up on tstop4me's advice if you can and don't give up!
 
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