ISU published bids for 2023-2024 competitions | Golden Skate

ISU published bids for 2023-2024 competitions

Weathergal

Medalist
Joined
May 25, 2014
The ISU published bids from cities that wish to host 2023-2024 figure skating competitions.

2024 Europeans
Minsk, Belarus
Sofia, Bulgaria
Zagreb, Croatia
Ostrava, Czech Republic
Budapest, Hungary
Bratislava, Slovakia

2024 Four Continents
Taipei City, Taiwan

2024 Junior Worlds
Minsk, Belarus

2024 Worlds
Sofia, Bulgaria
Montreal, Canada
Prague, Czech Republic
Budapest, Hungary
Bratislava, Slovakia
San Jose, United States

Link to ISU list

Which cities are you hoping for?

As a side note, could any posters from CZ let me know is Czech Republic or Czechia more correct? Thanks!
 

Mista Ekko

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 9, 2009
2024 Worlds - Montreal, Obviously

2024 Europeans - Zagreb (Same reason as Montreal)
or Sofia (been hosting a ton of Junior worlds, Maybe give them a bigger event)
 

Clairecz

On the Ice
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Apr 4, 2018
Country
Czech-Republic
As a side note, could any posters from CZ let me know is Czech Republic or Czechia more correct? Thanks!
Oficially, Czechia is the correct "abbreviated" form as eg. Slovakia for Slovak Republic, to be used in non-political context. And in political context "the Czech Republic" should be used.
But ewwwwww "Czechia" 🙈 I remember the heated discussion a few years ago when "Czechia" was officially presented as the translation of the country's name to the UN to be newly used like this.
I don't know the feelings of other Czech posters 😉 so in the end both is fine and correct (though I've never ever used "Czechia")
Anyway, hoping for Europeans in Ostrava 😍
 

Dreamer57

Medalist
Joined
May 20, 2018
Aw, no Sydney for Four Continents?

It would be nice to see 2024 Euros in Sofia!

I think Montréal and San Jose are the biggest contenders for Worlds.
 

anonymoose_au

Insert weird opinion here
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Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Country
Australia
Aw, no Sydney for Four Continents?
I think it's already locked in? So they didn't need to bid for it.

I wish World's would come down here though! That would be so epic!

ETA: I've just realised the 2023-24 season will be after the 2023 Four Continents, can a place even bid for an event twice in a row?
 

flanker

Record Breaker
Joined
Feb 10, 2018
Country
Czech-Republic
Oficially, Czechia is the correct "abbreviated" form as eg. Slovakia for Slovak Republic, to be used in non-political context. And in political context "the Czech Republic" should be used.
But ewwwwww "Czechia" 🙈 I remember the heated discussion a few years ago when "Czechia" was officially presented as the translation of the country's name to the UN to be newly used like this.
I don't know the feelings of other Czech posters 😉 so in the end both is fine and correct (though I've never ever used "Czechia")
Anyway, hoping for Europeans in Ostrava 😍
I share your feelings :)
 

surimi

Good luck in the new season, Sota!
Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 12, 2013
Hoping for Prague. A comp where I wouldn't have to pay for anything but tickets, would be a dream come true. And global skaters, not just European ones? Even better! Ostrava has its share of comps and glory, let the other regions enjoy too. Jeez, it's been 20 years since a big skating event took place in Prague, it's ridiculous.

@Weathergal , either name is fine. I myself am partial to 'Cheko' when talking to my foreign friends, but then, I've come to love this Japanese word and I have peculiar tastes, so definitely not an official name, just a usefully short one :)
 
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CaroLiza_fan

EZETTIE LATUASV IVAKMHA
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Oct 25, 2012
Country
Northern-Ireland
Oficially, Czechia is the correct "abbreviated" form as eg. Slovakia for Slovak Republic, to be used in non-political context. And in political context "the Czech Republic" should be used.
But ewwwwww "Czechia" 🙈 I remember the heated discussion a few years ago when "Czechia" was officially presented as the translation of the country's name to the UN to be newly used like this.
I don't know the feelings of other Czech posters 😉 so in the end both is fine and correct (though I've never ever used "Czechia")
Anyway, hoping for Europeans in Ostrava 😍

I share your feelings :)

Although I am not Czech, I feel the same.

The following is how I understand the situation as an English-speaker.

I suppose a lot of the reason "Czechia" doesn't feel right is for historical reasons. Although it has only been a country in it's own right for 30 years, the current Slovak Republic (to use it's long-form name) has been known as "Slovakia" for centuries. As a result, the short-form name "Slovakia" sits better with us than "The Slovak Republic".

"Czechia" doesn't have the same historical usage. The current country is an amalgamation of 3 historical kingdoms - Bohemia, Moravia and parts of Silesia. Although they have had a common ruler for quite a few centuries (Austria, followed by Czechoslovakia), they remained as 3 separate entities until relatively recently. During the German occupation, parts of them were united into a state called "Bohemia-Moravia". But after the war, administration in Czechoslovakia was centralised. So, they were not finally united into a single administrative unit until 1969, this time as "The Czech Socialist Republic".

When the Communists lost power, because there was no historically used short-form name, an amended version of the existing long-form name became the commonly used name - "The Czech Republic".

"Czechia" is an even more modern construct. As a result, because we have been used to calling it "The Czech Republic" for longer (albeit only 50 years), that is the name that sits better with us.

Even though the formal unification of Bohemia, Moravia and those parts of Silesia was relatively recent, they have been informally referred to collectively as "The Czech Lands" for centuries. So, if I can't be bothered saying the full 5 syllables of "The Czech Republic", I am inclined to use this as a shorter alternative. Hey, it's the same number of syllables as "Czechia" (3), but it sounds much better! ;) :biggrin:

@Weathergal , either name is fine. I myself am partial to 'Cheko' when talking to my foreign friends, but then, I've come to love this Japanese word and I have peculiar tastes, so definitely not an official name, just a usefully short one :)

What? You like Japanese things?! I would never have guessed that! 😲 :p

Yes, I have my tongue firmly in my cheek! It has been pretty obvious for a long time. :)

And just right you are! I like Japanese things too! :biggrin:

Hoping for Prague. A comp where I wouldn't have to pay for anything but tickets, would be a dream come true. And global skaters, not just European ones? Even better! Ostrava has its share of comps and glory, let the other regions enjoy too. Jeez, it's been 20 years since a big skating event took place in Prague, it's ridiculous.

Ooh, a bit of Bohemian / Moravian rivaly! :devil: :popcorn:

You do have a point, though. Ostrava does get a lot of events, whereas Prague doesn't.

Is there a reason for that in terms of the facilities? Are the rinks in Prague not as good as what Ostrava has?



Right, sorry to take us even further off track. But, I read something this morning and, since there are a lot of Czech speakers in this thread, I want to take the opportunity to ask something that I have often wondered.

Earlier this year, it was announced that the MotoGP race in Brno (Moravia) would not be held this year due to the circuit badly needing resurfaced, and the owners not being able to afford to do it. Then, today, it was announced that on the weekend that the MotoGP race would have been held, there would be a World Superbike race held at Most (Bohemia).

How do you pronounce Most? Is it pronounced like "moast", or is it pronounced like "maust"?

I don't know why, but for some reason I have always tended to pronounce it as "maust". But, now that a World Championship event is being held there, I would like to know for definite. So that I can complain if the commentators pronounce it wrong! :laugh:

CaroLiza_fan
 

surimi

Good luck in the new season, Sota!
Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 12, 2013
Hey, it's the same number of syllables as "Czechia" (3), but it sounds much better! ;) :biggrin:



Is there a reason for that in terms of the facilities? Are the rinks in Prague not as good as what Ostrava has?



How do you pronounce Most? Is it pronounced like "moast", or is it pronounced like "maust"?

One of the reasons for the support for 'Czechia' was international events - such a short name looks good on team jackets. As does the word 'Czech' printed on a team jacket, but then you have to explain that it's just the adjective, not the full name of your country.

Not anymore. IMO Ostrava is suited to smaller events, and Prague is suited to big ones. A new practice hall has been built next to the likely candidate venue, and that was probably the only valid argument of the antis. If the venue can handle show jumping and ice hockey WC, then it surely can host FS.

I'd say your pronunciation of 'Most' is almost spot on. It rhymes with 'lost' if it helps.

Sorry about the off-topic! :)
 

flanker

Record Breaker
Joined
Feb 10, 2018
Country
Czech-Republic
Although I am not Czech, I feel the same.

The following is how I understand the situation as an English-speaker.

I suppose a lot of the reason "Czechia" doesn't feel right is for historical reasons. Although it has only been a country in it's own right for 30 years, the current Slovak Republic (to use it's long-form name) has been known as "Slovakia" for centuries. As a result, the short-form name "Slovakia" sits better with us than "The Slovak Republic".

"Czechia" doesn't have the same historical usage. The current country is an amalgamation of 3 historical kingdoms - Bohemia, Moravia and parts of Silesia. Although they have had a common ruler for quite a few centuries (Austria, followed by Czechoslovakia), they remained as 3 separate entities until relatively recently. During the German occupation, parts of them were united into a state called "Bohemia-Moravia". But after the war, administration in Czechoslovakia was centralised. So, they were not finally united into a single administrative unit until 1969, this time as "The Czech Socialist Republic".

When the Communists lost power, because there was no historically used short-form name, an amended version of the existing long-form name became the commonly used name - "The Czech Republic".

"Czechia" is an even more modern construct. As a result, because we have been used to calling it "The Czech Republic" for longer (albeit only 50 years), that is the name that sits better with us.Even though the formal unification of Bohemia, Moravia and those parts of Silesia was relatively recent, they have been informally referred to collectively as "The Czech Lands" for centuries. So, if I can't be bothered saying the full 5 syllables of "The Czech Republic", I am inclined to use this as a shorter alternative. Hey, it's the same number of syllables as "Czechia" (3), but it sounds much better! ;) :biggrin:

The development of the name of the Czech state is extremely difficult as was the history itself :) it truly depends whether you named the land itself, the whole state (and in that case it depends in which period, Duchy of Bohenia, Kingdom of Bohemia or the republic era) or just the land of the Czechs. First there is the word Bohemia that was given to the land by the Romans and was derivered from the gaelic tribe of Boii. The word is not (and was not) commonly used by Czechs in native language as we are not the descendants of the Gauls and brought the name of our slavic tribe (Czechs) that continually dominated the other ones, but it survived as the latin official name for the land ruled by the czech sovereign, duke in the early medieval times, king later since the 12th/13th century, originally just for the lands inhabited by Czechs, later also for the lands that were unided with the crown of the bohemian king or the vassal states.

As for the Moravia, it was reconquered from Poland (won't go into details) for the czech duke Oldřich by his son the prince (later duke) Břetislav in the early 11th century. In that time it became an integral part of the Duchy of Bohemia (if we can use such term for an early medieval state), but later there were established three separate vassal duchies (duchys? Here my english fails me :biggrin: ) for the junior princes of the ruling přemyslid dynasty.

About a 100 years later (1182) the holy roman emperor Friedrich Barbarossa used the in-fighting between the members of the přemyslid dynasty (why only we don't make TV shows about that, Game of Thrones is a fairy tale compared to the second half of the 12th century in Bohemia) and established separate Margraviate of Moravia that was independent to the duke of Bohemia and was vassal only to the Empire. Also, all the possession of the bishop of Prague was violently taken out of the hands of the duke and established as the in fact separate unit, thanks to the hatred and greed of the bishop Jindřich Břetislav, whose cruelty, malice and will to dominate all life :biggrin: paradoxically helped to prevent the complete desintegration of the state at the end because in his greed he gained all the separate titles - the bishop, the bohemian duke and the markgrave of Moravia and than he did the only useful thing in his life - he died very soon after that :biggrin:. Later rulers (kings since 1212) then unified all the titles under one crown.

In 1356 the czech king and emperor of the Holy Roman Empire Charles IV. pushed through a golden bull (edict) that more or less unified the name of the state as the "Lands of the Bohemian Crown", which more or less preserved all the times even during the Habsburg era till the 1918.

But as for the separate lands the problem is that what was called Bohemia in latin and many other languages later as the land itself, not as a state (means the part without Moravia, Silesia etc.) , Bohemia in english, Böhmen in german etc. is called "Čechy" by us (best understood as The Land of Czechs). That's what I was talking about at the beginning, that the word Bohemia is not actively used by us, only in historical context. Here is where the problem begins, in czech in fact does not exist a generally accepted term for the unified land of Czechs and Moravians (which is also difficult to say whether Moravians should be taken as a separate group or not but that's not a topic for this) that would not derive from the system of government: "crown/duchy/kingdon/republic".

The word Čechie (Czechia) as a name of the female protector of the land is a term created during the 19th century as a part of the Czech National Revival, because other existing terms were either too connected with the german/austrian/Habsburg dominance and oppression of the czech and slavic element, or were too obsolete. In fact it was pretty widely used during the second half of the 19th century and survived till the 1st republic (1918-1938), for instance many sport clubs settled in that era took that name as a demonstration of the national pride. But it wasn't used for the name of the country itself. When we freed from the Austria-Hungary, we united with Slovakia and the newly created official name of the state was the Republic of Czechoslovakia (or shortened as Czechoslovakia=Československo or the official abbreviation RČS) and the inhabitants were accepted as "Czechoslovakians" (by the supporters of the unified state and non-collaborators with the Germans).

After the WWII it was changed to Czechoslovak (Socialistic as the part of the name only since 1960) Republic (and still shortened to Československo with abbreviation ČSR and ČSSR since 1960). Internally we understood the parts of the republic as "Čechy" and "Slovensko" Slovakia and the term Čechy was understood as the common name for both Bohemia and Moravia. This was more or less accepted during the whole era of the Czechoslovakia, but after the velvet revolution and the separation of Slovakia it again transpired that the common name for both Čechy/Bohemia and Morava/Moravia is missing (here the czech/moravian rivalry took its part - one of the good things of the former socialist times was that nobody really cared about this in a serious way, but with the freedom came also the freedom to be a total moron :biggrin:).

The word "Česko" in fact exists from the 18th century, but it sounds very unnatural for the language when used separately and not only as a part of Československo and never became broadly used despite several attempts. So I guess in the common use people will have to reconcile that the name Czech Republic will be still here for a very long time.

I'm sorry for this long (but still very short and simplified) introduction to the problem of a name of one small country in the heart of Europe.

How do you pronounce Most? Is it pronounced like "moast", or is it pronounced like "maust"?

Most is pronounced just Most. Short, no added vowel.
 
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NaVi

Medalist
Joined
Oct 30, 2014
Something needs to change with Junior Worlds and 4CC. Seems like (especially with Junior Worlds) that federations are reluctant to bid on them because they think it'll hurt their bids for other events.

Montreal should probably get picked, but something that should be considered in the future is that last non-Russian, former-Eastern Bloc country to host the World championships was Prague in 1993.

A couple months ago I looked back at old European events from the past decade and out of the choices listed here I liked the arenas for Minsk and Budapest out of the choices here. Pretty sure Budapest was not a permanent arena though.
 

flanker

Record Breaker
Joined
Feb 10, 2018
Country
Czech-Republic
One of the reasons for the support for 'Czechia' was international events - such a short name looks good on team jackets. As does the word 'Czech' printed on a team jacket, but then you have to explain that it's just the adjective, not the full name of your country.

Not anymore. IMO Ostrava is suited to smaller events, and Prague is suited to big ones. A new practice hall has been built next to the likely candidate venue, and that was probably the only valid argument of the antis. If the venue can handle show jumping and ice hockey WC, then it surely can host FS.

Ostrava is good for any sport even that is not football or ice hockey. Unfortunately Prague often does not show much intention in organizing other sports competitions of a big scale.

I'd say your pronunciation of 'Most' is almost spot on. It rhymes with 'lost' if it helps.

Sorry about the off-topic! :)
It's a good example with lost. (y)
Most czech words are pronounced like that, with no added sound.
 

surimi

Good luck in the new season, Sota!
Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 12, 2013
Ostrava is good for any sport even that is not football or ice hockey. Unfortunately Prague often does not show much intention in organizing other sports competitions of a big scale.

Doesn't the federation bid, not the city itself? I honestly don't know how this works.

For global events this big, I think you do need a city which has a large airport with direct flights from various global destinations, and easy access through public transport, and eating/restroom facilities right next to the venue. Not that many hotels available in Ostrava, either, to accomodate global audience... Let's be realistic. Maybe if spectators are still not allowed by 2024, then I'd say good idea. But imagining hundreds of Asian fans trying to get to Ostrava.. with all due respect, I think big cities are the more reasonable solution.

I also think the ISU picks shouldn't be the same old same old. They want to make skating global and grow its popularity in various places, don't they? Cities that bid, have all the facilities for athletes and fans alike, *and* haven't hosted events in a while, should get precedence.
 

CaroLiza_fan

EZETTIE LATUASV IVAKMHA
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One of the reasons for the support for 'Czechia' was international events - such a short name looks good on team jackets. As does the word 'Czech' printed on a team jacket, but then you have to explain that it's just the adjective, not the full name of your country.

Funny you should say that, because I have been watching the Egna Spring Trophy this afternoon, and I made a point of looking at Olusa GAJDOSOVA's jacket. And although it had the full "Czech Republic" written on the back, it didn't look like it was taking up too much space.

Not anymore. IMO Ostrava is suited to smaller events, and Prague is suited to big ones. A new practice hall has been built next to the likely candidate venue, and that was probably the only valid argument of the antis. If the venue can handle show jumping and ice hockey WC, then it surely can host FS.

Yep. Figure skaters don't need stables. :laugh:

Seriously, though. That is good that the investment has been made in building a hall that could be used as a practice rink.

I guess for some people there is an added prestige to a big event if it is held in the national capital. Which is why the UK hasn't held an ISU Championship in a long time. The ISU wants it to be in London, but the Fed doesn't.

Personally, I think that is snobbish rubbish. If a regional city has better facilities, then why shouldn't it host a Major?!

But, from what you say, Prague now has the facilities. So, it should get the chance.

I'd say your pronunciation of 'Most' is almost spot on. It rhymes with 'lost' if it helps.

YES!!!!! :cheer:

Thank you so much. From what little Czech I have heard, I just had a feeling that it would be pronounced like that.

At the time I was writing, I could think of "toast" as a word that rhymes with the wrong pronounciation. But I just couldn't think of a word that rhymes with my (correct) pronounciation. My mind had just gone blank! ( @elektra blue would likely say it is yet more proof that I am getting old!) So, that's why I went with attempting to spell it phonetically.

Because the English word "most" is pronounced like "toast", I know fine well the commentators will pronounce it like that! It took them years to pronounce the Irish name "Caolan" correctly, despite being told many times.

Sorry about the off-topic! :)

Hey, no need for you to apologise. You were just answering my questions. I am the guilty party!

CaroLiza_fan
 

ladyjane

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Joined
Jun 26, 2012
Country
Netherlands
I am now eagerly awaiting a tv-show about the Přemyslid dynasty. Despite not being British I am a bit of a British 'old' history nerd (I know my Bede) but actually any pre- or mediaeval history is welcome. Especially if it's less well-known (I do know about the Czech 'habit' to throw officials one is dissatisfied with out of the window, there were three of those occurrences, but they took place much and much later). Thank you @flanker. This bit of Czech history is warmly welcomed!
 
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flanker

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Joined
Feb 10, 2018
Country
Czech-Republic
Doesn't the federation bid, not the city itself? I honestly don't know how this works.

For global events this big, I think you do need a city which has a large airport with direct flights from various global destinations, and easy access through public transport, and eating/restroom facilities right next to the venue. Not that many hotels available in Ostrava, either, to accomodate global audience... Let's be realistic. Maybe if spectators are still not allowed by 2024, then I'd say good idea. But imagining hundreds of Asian fans trying to get to Ostrava.. with all due respect, I think big cities are the more reasonable solution.

I also think the ISU picks shouldn't be the same old same old. They want to make skating global and grow its popularity in various places, don't they? Cities that bid, have all the facilities for athletes and fans alike, *and* haven't hosted events in a while, should get precedence.
I don't think you should underestimate Ostrava. Ostrava participated on organizig world ice hockey championships, organized European figure skating championships, davis cup tournaments etc. Czech Republic is not justž Prague and I say that as a citizen of Prague. For mew it would be of course much more convenient if a figure skating competition would be held in Prague, but cities like Ostrava or Brno are much more active in organizing other international sport events than just football and ice hockey.
 
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