Jackson Atom Elle Inline Figure Roller Skate | Golden Skate

Jackson Atom Elle Inline Figure Roller Skate

cl2

Final Flight
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Hi all, I've been considering getting inline roller skates, and learnt about a new line of roller skates by Jackson. Does anyone have any experience with them? I saw some recent threads about pic skates and snow whites, but the Jackson set seems convenient to buy as a set and the price is right.

Right now, I am looking at the Elle + Mirage frame set (which seems to be the roller version of the Elle + Mirage blade set). For my figure skates, I'm currently in Jackson Premieres, which are rated for Axel/beginning double jumps, whereas Elle is rated for half jumps. I don't intend to jump in the inline skates, but I'm concerned that the Elle boot might still be way less support than what I'm used to. Is it OK to go down in stiffness for inlines?

Thanks in advance for your advice!
 

WednesdayMarch

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
I currently skate on Roll Line Lineas with Risport Royal Pro boots. I use the same boot for my inlines as I do on ice, as I find it easier to swap between the two. I'm primarily a dancer and I don't jump but that dance knee bend breaks down boots as quickly as jumping.

I've heard that the Jackson Mirage inlines are nice and if you're happy with a set rocker, then I'd say go for it. You can always keep the frames and just swap the boot for a pair of Premieres if you find the Elle isn't supportive enough or breaks down quickly. (You can also change the rocker slightly by using a larger wheel in the middle and smaller on the front and back.)

Good luck! Enjoy the terrifying transition onto wheels! Don't forget your padding. Asphalt and concrete are a lot more painful than ice.
 

berry

Spectator
Joined
Jul 2, 2021
Country
Canada
I just recently purchased my first inlines and am getting used to the transition, but so far I am happy with my Jackson Entre + Jackson Mirage frame!
 

cl2

Final Flight
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
I just recently purchased my first inlines and am getting used to the transition, but so far I am happy with my Jackson Entre + Jackson Mirage frame!
I currently skate on Roll Line Lineas with Risport Royal Pro boots. I use the same boot for my inlines as I do on ice, as I find it easier to swap between the two. I'm primarily a dancer and I don't jump but that dance knee bend breaks down boots as quickly as jumping.

I've heard that the Jackson Mirage inlines are nice and if you're happy with a set rocker, then I'd say go for it. You can always keep the frames and just swap the boot for a pair of Premieres if you find the Elle isn't supportive enough or breaks down quickly. (You can also change the rocker slightly by using a larger wheel in the middle and smaller on the front and back.)

Good luck! Enjoy the terrifying transition onto wheels! Don't forget your padding. Asphalt and concrete are a lot more painful than ice.
Thanks for the tips, I just ordered a pair! I figured why not give it a try. I definitely will not miss having to break in stiffer boots, and when I'm ready for a new pair of figure skate boots, I can always transfer the frame over to my present boots.

My skate tech also pointed out that a deeper knee bend is needed to keep one's balance over the wheels, so a softer boot may not be a bad thing. Though, I don't know if it's just the pictures being deceptive, but the hind wheel and overall frame length looks to be shorter than the hind portion of the freestyle blade. (Maybe more similar to the shorter dance blades?) I will need to be mindful not to slip off the back wheel.

Definitely will be getting myself a full arsenal of protective gear!
 

WednesdayMarch

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
There are some frames with longer tails, but they involve 4 wheels. The Off-Ice brand have a much longer tail, with almost a whole extra wheel at the back. Personally, I didn't like it as I felt I was always getting the "click of death" on crossovers. I'm much, much happier with my shorter Lineas, although I did worry about the shortness to start with. You will notice that at first but should soon settle down.
 

Elija

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
There are some frames with longer tails, but they involve 4 wheels. The Off-Ice brand have a much longer tail, with almost a whole extra wheel at the back. Personally, I didn't like it as I felt I was always getting the "click of death" on crossovers. I'm much, much happier with my shorter Lineas, although I did worry about the shortness to start with. You will notice that at first but should soon settle down.
Ooh, you’ve had both off ice and Linea? I’ve been trying to find someone who has tried those specific two. I currently have off ice and don’t love them to be honest. Everyone says they feel the most like ice skates due to the smaller wheels, but as I have to skate outside when I wear them I also find those smaller wheels get stuck on every tiny leaf, stone, stick, crack in the pavement etc. Strongly considering getting some linea wheels, but they’re so expensive I want to be sure. I also don’t like the rocker on the off ice, the toe stop is too far from the front wheel. Have you found the lineas any easier for jumping or spinning?
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
Ooh, you’ve had both off ice and Linea? I’ve been trying to find someone who has tried those specific two. I currently have off ice and don’t love them to be honest. Everyone says they feel the most like ice skates due to the smaller wheels, but as I have to skate outside when I wear them I also find those smaller wheels get stuck on every tiny leaf, stone, stick, crack in the pavement etc. Strongly considering getting some linea wheels, but they’re so expensive I want to be sure. I also don’t like the rocker on the off ice, the toe stop is too far from the front wheel. Have you found the lineas any easier for jumping or spinning?
She said in her first post that she doesn't jump.
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
I thought that was for ice. Regardless, would just love to hear an overall comparison between the two brands from someone who has tried both.
No, the way she stated it does not implicate that and which was my point. Also, no one is stopping you from getting that comparison.:shrug:
 
Last edited:

Elija

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
No, the way she stated it does not implicate that and which was my point. Also, no one is stopping you from getting that comparison.:shrug:
I didn’t say they were? All I said is how I understood her initial comment. If it was wrong that’s fine, was just clarifying I was interested in a general comparison not just a comparison for jumps. It honestly feels really negative on this board sometimes being criticised for just asking someone else a question, which I was really excited to hear about. This is not the first time and makes hesitant to post anything.
 

WednesdayMarch

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
Ooh, you’ve had both off ice and Linea? I’ve been trying to find someone who has tried those specific two. I currently have off ice and don’t love them to be honest. Everyone says they feel the most like ice skates due to the smaller wheels, but as I have to skate outside when I wear them I also find those smaller wheels get stuck on every tiny leaf, stone, stick, crack in the pavement etc. Strongly considering getting some linea wheels, but they’re so expensive I want to be sure. I also don’t like the rocker on the off ice, the toe stop is too far from the front wheel. Have you found the lineas any easier for jumping or spinning?
Can't help you with jumping and spinning as I don't do either on inlines, although I have made feeble attempts at spinning on both and have to say that the Linea felt a lot more possible!

I specifically bought the Off-Ice for three reasons: a) I'm in the UK, b) I felt that they looked like they'd feel more like ice and c) I honestly thought that the longer frame with the wheel at the back would be easier and feel less scary for things like backward three turns. I used them last summer on asphalt (terrifying but with a great view over Plymouth Sound) and in the autumn in a sports hall (much more like ice and I actually managed some footwork).

Fast forward six months through lockdowns and bad weather, and I used the Off-Ice a couple of times on asphalt and a horrendous floor with an anti-slip coating (don't ask, I'm still traumatised). I was seduced by a great deal on a pair of ex-demo Lineas with Edea Overture boots and coughed up the money to buy them.

Game changer. Even with the Edea boots (which I have discovered I loathe), it felt so much more like ice. There's more flow, more speed, more freedom. Because the wheels are bigger, you get more oomph for your push and I'm sure I'm not feeling the little stones and bits of detritus on the asphalt nearly as much as with the others. I was worried I'd find them too high and too short at the back, but I haven't noticed the height and whilst the first few strokes had me very aware of the shortness, I am so much more comfortable on them. There's no more "click of death" when I cross over and C-steps are less scary. I'm also finding that I've picked up three turns again far more quickly than I did on the Off-Ice ones.

So yes, I absolutely LOVE the Lineas. My skating chums have been desperate to try them, so at the end of yesterday's session, several of them had a try. They all really liked them, although the one who does jump said she'd stick with Off-Ice because she thought she'd feel less confident jumping on Lineas as they're shorter and she needs her weight further back in order to not catch the toe stop. She didn't try jumping on them, though, so that's possibly not as helpful as it could be! The one who is most terrified of the whole wheels thing said they were way better than her Off-Ice and although terrifying, actually felt "doable", which is a lot coming from her!

Any further questions, don't hesitate to ask. :biggrin:
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
I didn’t say they were? All I said is how I understood her initial comment. If it was wrong that’s fine, was just clarifying I was interested in a general comparison not just a comparison for jumps. It honestly feels really negative on this board sometimes being criticised for just asking someone else a question, which I was really excited to hear about. This is not the first time and makes hesitant to post anything.
I wasn't being negative. Perhaps you misunderstood my post, I was initially helping you.
 

Elija

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Can't help you with jumping and spinning as I don't do either on inlines, although I have made feeble attempts at spinning on both and have to say that the Linea felt a lot more possible!

I specifically bought the Off-Ice for three reasons: a) I'm in the UK, b) I felt that they looked like they'd feel more like ice and c) I honestly thought that the longer frame with the wheel at the back would be easier and feel less scary for things like backward three turns. I used them last summer on asphalt (terrifying but with a great view over Plymouth Sound) and in the autumn in a sports hall (much more like ice and I actually managed some footwork).

Fast forward six months through lockdowns and bad weather, and I used the Off-Ice a couple of times on asphalt and a horrendous floor with an anti-slip coating (don't ask, I'm still traumatised). I was seduced by a great deal on a pair of ex-demo Lineas with Edea Overture boots and coughed up the money to buy them.

Game changer. Even with the Edea boots (which I have discovered I loathe), it felt so much more like ice. There's more flow, more speed, more freedom. Because the wheels are bigger, you get more oomph for your push and I'm sure I'm not feeling the little stones and bits of detritus on the asphalt nearly as much as with the others. I was worried I'd find them too high and too short at the back, but I haven't noticed the height and whilst the first few strokes had me very aware of the shortness, I am so much more comfortable on them. There's no more "click of death" when I cross over and C-steps are less scary. I'm also finding that I've picked up three turns again far more quickly than I did on the Off-Ice ones.

So yes, I absolutely LOVE the Lineas. My skating chums have been desperate to try them, so at the end of yesterday's session, several of them had a try. They all really liked them, although the one who does jump said she'd stick with Off-Ice because she thought she'd feel less confident jumping on Lineas as they're shorter and she needs her weight further back in order to not catch the toe stop. She didn't try jumping on them, though, so that's possibly not as helpful as it could be! The one who is most terrified of the whole wheels thing said they were way better than her Off-Ice and although terrifying, actually felt "doable", which is a lot coming from her!

Any further questions, don't hesitate to ask. :biggrin:
That’s fabulous, thank you so much! And for all the detail! Will definitely look into trying a pair. Hopefully my local shop has some mounted and can have a whizz around in them first. I’ve got some ice boots that they can be mounted on luckily, cause damn the lineas are pricey.
 

WednesdayMarch

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
That’s fabulous, thank you so much! And for all the detail! Will definitely look into trying a pair. Hopefully my local shop has some mounted and can have a whizz around in them first. I’ve got some ice boots that they can be mounted on luckily, cause damn the lineas are pricey.
Worth every penny, in my opinion. :biggrin:

I don't know where you are in the world, but I'm in the UK and bought mine ex-demo from Skatermate, who are well respected in the roller-skating community (and also supply ice skating equipment). They are much cheaper (£254.40 for the frame set) than Everglides, who retail the frame only at £250 and the set at £295.
 

Elija

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
Worth every penny, in my opinion. :biggrin:

I don't know where you are in the world, but I'm in the UK and bought mine ex-demo from Skatermate, who are well respected in the roller-skating community (and also supply ice skating equipment). They are much cheaper (£254.40 for the frame set) than Everglides, who retail the frame only at £250 and the set at £295.
Frames are about NZD$450 here. And I think you still had to buy wheels. I ordered my off ice frames from UK - they weren't too expensive but the shipping was crazy, about $150.
 

cl2

Final Flight
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Update!

I received the Jackson Elle + Mirage frames about a week ago, and took it out for a spin (literally and figuratively) several times. It was both fun and scary at the same time! (Snowplow stops can send you flying...)

Some aspects were similar to on-ice: the general motor patterns are similar, and yes, there indeed is a feeling of inside and outside edges. But the similarities end there! The way that friction from the ground acts on the wheel is slightly different from how friction on ice acts on the blade (maybe because there are two points of contact between the wheels and the ground, whereas just a single point of contact between the blade and the ice) so that will take some adjustments to get used to. The toe stop also feels much more "stoppy" than toepicks. I feel like I have to lean the boot much more in the inlines to get the same amount of edge action, maybe because the wheels are wider than the blade? Is this a common issue experienced in other brands of inline wheels as well?

My beef with the Jackson Elle boot is the fit is too loose around the ankle for my liking. I prefer very snug ankle fits. These are sold as a set so I didn't get to customize, but I will swap out the Elles with my current Premieres once I'm ready to get new figure skates. Meanwhile, I'll be getting bunga pads.

Question: are there skate guards for wheels? I'd like to be able to put on skate guards so as not to fall down stairs or roll down inclines.
 

marcopolobear

Rinkside
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Country
Canada
Hi,

I have the same frames and feel all the same things as you. Yes, don't try snow plow stops -- the only way I found to slow down was to do spread eagles or make continuous circles. I have seen videos of skaters dragging the wheels of one skate held sideways behind them, but that seemed to me like a great way to wear out your wheels (or make flat spots on them).

Yeah the toe stopper is very grippy; I actually wish it was of harder material. Certainly they are great for Waltz jumps and Axel (attempts haha) but give me too much friction when trying spins. The stopper height makes a big difference. Mine seemed to be set too low from the factory, so I raised it about "half a turn". I learned also to bring the wrenches with me because sometimes these loosen up when skating.

Exactly for leaning for edges! From videos this seems to be similar to other brands. Maybe on an indoor smooth surface the wheels have more leeway to slide a bit for curves? Anyway, I found this to be a great advantage for skating because it really forces you to do a lot of deep edges -- something that is not always practiced a lot on the ice!

For me, spins and some 3-turns were pretty scary. Backspin seemed the least scary and easiest to get going. I think I could do sitspins, but I haven't gotten the boots broken in enough. Back three's seemed most difficult because I have to lift the entire boot up and onto the back wheel in order to turn it.

But I'm back on the ice finally and it is wonderful :-D


M.
 

WednesdayMarch

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
Update!

I received the Jackson Elle + Mirage frames about a week ago, and took it out for a spin (literally and figuratively) several times. It was both fun and scary at the same time! (Snowplow stops can send you flying...)

Some aspects were similar to on-ice: the general motor patterns are similar, and yes, there indeed is a feeling of inside and outside edges. But the similarities end there! The way that friction from the ground acts on the wheel is slightly different from how friction on ice acts on the blade (maybe because there are two points of contact between the wheels and the ground, whereas just a single point of contact between the blade and the ice) so that will take some adjustments to get used to. The toe stop also feels much more "stoppy" than toepicks. I feel like I have to lean the boot much more in the inlines to get the same amount of edge action, maybe because the wheels are wider than the blade? Is this a common issue experienced in other brands of inline wheels as well?

My beef with the Jackson Elle boot is the fit is too loose around the ankle for my liking. I prefer very snug ankle fits. These are sold as a set so I didn't get to customize, but I will swap out the Elles with my current Premieres once I'm ready to get new figure skates. Meanwhile, I'll be getting bunga pads.

Question: are there skate guards for wheels? I'd like to be able to put on skate guards so as not to fall down stairs or roll down inclines.
It's definitely different from ice skating, although there are also similarities. I like a snug fit around my ankle and when I tried my Lineas with the Edea boots they came with, I really didn't like it. After swapping the Edeas out with my Risport, I'm much happier and a lot braver. I also find the toe stop, "stoppier" and know exactly what you mean.

As far as I'm aware, there are no "guards" for inline wheels. You're either rolling or...
 
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