Making myself crazy

Nimyue

On the Ice
Joined
May 15, 2018
Do the heels of Risport and Jackson boots really differ this much in height?

And is this true for old and new Jackson models alike, or did they change the heel height when they revamped their product line? And where do Edeas fit in there?
(I'm asking because I'm looking for a new pair of boots and thinking of sticking with Jacksons for several reasons, but a lower heel sounds really appealing too... *sigh)

I'm astonished this would have such an effect, how much of a difference is there, I would guess no more than 1 cm? :confused:

Then again, I once tried orthopedic insoles (moulded on my skating boots) and I didn't like skating in them at all, because I didn't feel 'as connected' to the blades. They were approx. 0.5 cm thicker in the heel area than the original insoles. Tried them twice, ditched them each time after a few minutes. Although I wouldn't say that I was skating more on my toe-picks, I just felt less in control of my blades.

Incidentally, I also skated a few times without any insoles at all (first time was totally unintentional, because for some reason I forgot to put them back in after having taken them out for drying and I legit did not figure out why everything felt so different, until I took my boots off after 1.5 hours :laugh:). And I have to say, I've never felt this much 'over my blades' and in the right spot as I did on those occasions. Which is insane, because the original Jackson insoles aren't exactly that thick. Utimately I couldn't continue doing that because the lack of an insole resulted in too loose fitting boots and my feet would start hurting from the lack of any arch support at all and the hard inside base of the boots, but it sure was an interesting experiment.

Anyways, back to the topic and to the OP: different boots and blades might help, but until you can get your hands on them, maybe try experimenting a bit with your insoles too? Won't be a longterm solution, but it might be interesting or give you some new insights.

A small height difference in the heel makes a huge difference in how they feel. Because I'm a nerd for this stuff, plus I've tried a lot of skates, I was able to compare a Jackson, Edea, and Risport of the same size. The Jackson heel was BY FAR the highest, it is higher than Edea. The Risport was the lowest of the three. However, it should be noted, that the Edea and Risport have a shorter sole length for the same size, so the pitch is more forward. So the Edea might feel very much like the Jackson even though the heel is actually lower. My daughter wears Riedell, and the heel height is about the same as the Risport, without the forward pitch.
 

oldsk8er

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 12, 2020
Do the heels of Risport and Jackson boots really differ this much in height?

And is this true for old and new Jackson models alike, or did they change the heel height when they revamped their product line? And where do Edeas fit in there?
(I'm asking because I'm looking for a new pair of boots and thinking of sticking with Jacksons for several reasons, but a lower heel sounds really appealing too... *sigh)

I'm astonished this would have such an effect, how much of a difference is there, I would guess no more than 1 cm? :confused:

Then again, I once tried orthopedic insoles (moulded on my skating boots) and I didn't like skating in them at all, because I didn't feel 'as connected' to the blades. They were approx. 0.5 cm thicker in the heel area than the original insoles. Tried them twice, ditched them each time after a few minutes. Although I wouldn't say that I was skating more on my toe-picks, I just felt less in control of my blades.

Incidentally, I also skated a few times without any insoles at all (first time was totally unintentional, because for some reason I forgot to put them back in after having taken them out for drying and I legit did not figure out why everything felt so different, until I took my boots off after 1.5 hours :laugh:). And I have to say, I've never felt this much 'over my blades' and in the right spot as I did on those occasions. Which is insane, because the original Jackson insoles aren't exactly that thick. Utimately I couldn't continue doing that because the lack of an insole resulted in too loose fitting boots and my feet would start hurting from the lack of any arch support at all and the hard inside base of the boots, but it sure was an interesting experiment.

Anyways, back to the topic and to the OP: different boots and blades might help, but until you can get your hands on them, maybe try experimenting a bit with your insoles too? Won't be a longterm solution, but it might be interesting or give you some new insights.


Believe me, I did try experimenting with different insoles, without insoles. Still had the same issues.
Without the insoles my arches would ache so bad, but I tried to skate through it and couldn't.
Have been told I have high arches ,so sure the no arch support was the root cause of that.
Also thinking with my high arches and higher heel in the Jackson's, that is also contributing to me having issues.
 

hanyuufan5

❅*:・。.✨
Medalist
Joined
May 19, 2018
Note that heel size might make little to no difference in people like me who live in high heels. :laugh: Others, it can make a big difference.
 

Ic3Rabbit

Le professionnel d'élite
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
A small height difference in the heel makes a huge difference in how they feel. Because I'm a nerd for this stuff, plus I've tried a lot of skates, I was able to compare a Jackson, Edea, and Risport of the same size. The Jackson heel was BY FAR the highest, it is higher than Edea. The Risport was the lowest of the three. However, it should be noted, that the Edea and Risport have a shorter sole length for the same size, so the pitch is more forward. So the Edea might feel very much like the Jackson even though the heel is actually lower. My daughter wears Riedell, and the heel height is about the same as the Risport, without the forward pitch.

I just want to address that I have very high arches and wear Jackson and Risport. I could not wear Edea and could feel a difference, Edea felt nothing like Jackson.


Believe me, I did try experimenting with different insoles, without insoles. Still had the same issues.
Without the insoles my arches would ache so bad, but I tried to skate through it and couldn't.
Have been told I have high arches ,so sure the no arch support was the root cause of that.
Also thinking with my high arches and higher heel in the Jackson's, that is also contributing to me having issues.


I have high arches, wear Jackson's for my freestyle (singles) skating, and they work just fine. ;)
 

oldsk8er

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 12, 2020
Hope when I get new boots and blades my skating will improve and start to come back.
Have to wait and see.
Jackson's apparently aren't for me. LOL
 

Ic3Rabbit

Le professionnel d'élite
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
Hope when I get new boots and blades my skating will improve and start to come back.
Have to wait and see.
Jackson's apparently aren't for me. LOL

I've also worn Riedell in the past. ;)
 

Annie122

Rinkside
Joined
Apr 3, 2018
I skated in Reidell emeralds for my first pair of skates. They were comfortable and gave me a good entry level skate to decide if I wanted to keep up with skating. But they were pretty limited in skills advancement to a point. As the others have said, with the blade sets they're entry level. Mine weren't met for jumps at all.

Internally, I wanted so bad to stay in Reidells, but when I tried them on I wasn't comfortable at all! My toes felt like they weren't reaching the end of the boot. I tried on Riedells, Ripsport, and Jacksons. Jacksons were the most comfortable. Your experience in an entry level boot does not reflect what your experience will be with a higher level boot (and probably nicer last)

I got the debut fusions with a CA blade. At first it was definitely a transition. The blade is shorter than my original Reidell pair and there is a lot more arch support. My crossovers and under pushes felt better than they ever did in my old boots immediately. My spins have improved quite a bit with more support and new blades. The shorter blade made jumping feel a bit off at first, but the larger toe pick helped.


Hope when I get new boots and blades my skating will improve and start to come back.
Have to wait and see.

Can I be nosy? What kind of skills aren't coming back? I've seen comments floating around here about people losing their scratch spins after 20 years of skating regularly. Sometimes skills become shy - And give yourself credit, your body is re-learning a sport you haven't done regularly for quite a while. Your muscles and coordination need time to catch up! [ but it does sound like new skates will lead to an improvement]
 

oldsk8er

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 12, 2020
I skated in Reidell emeralds for my first pair of skates. They were comfortable and gave me a good entry level skate to decide if I wanted to keep up with skating. But they were pretty limited in skills advancement to a point. As the others have said, with the blade sets they're entry level. Mine weren't met for jumps at all.

Internally, I wanted so bad to stay in Reidells, but when I tried them on I wasn't comfortable at all! My toes felt like they weren't reaching the end of the boot. I tried on Riedells, Ripsport, and Jacksons. Jacksons were the most comfortable. Your experience in an entry level boot does not reflect what your experience will be with a higher level boot (and probably nicer last)

I got the debut fusions with a CA blade. At first it was definitely a transition. The blade is shorter than my original Reidell pair and there is a lot more arch support. My crossovers and under pushes felt better than they ever did in my old boots immediately. My spins have improved quite a bit with more support and new blades. The shorter blade made jumping feel a bit off at first, but the larger toe pick helped.




Can I be nosy? What kind of skills aren't coming back? I've seen comments floating around here about people losing their scratch spins after 20 years of skating regularly. Sometimes skills become shy - And give yourself credit, your body is re-learning a sport you haven't done regularly for quite a while. Your muscles and coordination need time to catch up! [ but it does sound like new skates will lead to an improvement]


Basically everything! I feel like a tot on the ice for the first time. LOL! I did synchro skating in the past.. Did not have synchro blades.
I have been working on just trying to get my basic skills back! Haven't even tried 3 turns ( well tried, but holy S#%t) or any thing from my synchro days.
As I said ,ever since I got these skates, seems like they have hindered me .
I have had a few private lessons just to work on my basic skills- forward/backward stroking,crossover's,edges etc.... instructor said that I look good (from body position, knee bends, hips etc....)
Just as I have mentioned, just having a really hard time keeping off the drag pick and getting my weight towards back of blade when I need to.( feel as if I am constantly rolled forward)

I went to an open skate and had rink all to myself, worked on my forward stroking and crossovers and I could clearly see my tracings-no matter how hard I tried to transfer weight,there on my strokes was the evidence of my drag pick (good god!) so very frustrating!

So yeah, IDK... Going to keep plugging away!
Not even thinking about spins,twizzles or anything else right now LOL
 
Top