Russian alphabet test/Learning Russian | Page 3 | Golden Skate

Russian alphabet test/Learning Russian

LiamForeman

William/Uilyam
Medalist
Joined
Nov 24, 2006
Ё is always there even if it hides its dots. :)
I'm seeing/realizing that more and more... I want to learn the "King's Russian" with perfectly correct grammar/spelling/pronunciation. But Russian seems to be MUCH more informal. Now it's just vocabulary repetition for me.... this is not easy! lol
 

vorravorra

Record Breaker
Joined
Apr 9, 2016
My husband's name is John: Dzhon (Джон). So that seems to cover the G as in gentle sound, I think?
In Russian this combination stands for two separate sounds and is represented by two letters (three in transliteration) because it's not a native Russian sound. For foreign words with a J sound you end up with J->ДЖ->DZH. So any name that has a DZH in it like Dikidzhi is actually Dikiji since whatever language that name is from has a "soft g" sound unlike Russian.
 
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vorravorra

Record Breaker
Joined
Apr 9, 2016
Ё is always there even if it hides its dots. :)
Yes, my dream is that one day Ё is written everywhere it is pronounced. The problem is that the letter Ё is a late addition to the Russian alphabet (18th century) because the sound change that requires it occurred very late in the language history. So it ended up with a marginal status. Most of the time you are just supposed to know where E is actually pronounced Ё. A rule has recently been introduced to write Ё everywhere where it could potentially be ambiguous, including in names, at least in texts. But when it comes to documents, the problem is that many people have Ё written as E in their birth certificated, passports etc., and you can't just change that arbitrarily or you'll have to prove to the authorities Usachёva and Usacheva are in fact the same surname.
 
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lariko

Medalist
Joined
Jan 31, 2019
Country
Canada
I'm seeing/realizing that more and more... I want to learn the "King's Russian" with perfectly correct grammar/spelling/pronunciation. But Russian seems to be MUCH more informal. Now it's just vocabulary repetition for me.... this is not easy! lol
Well, the skater who has the most hidden yo’s is probably Artem Kovalev (2)
 

Alex Fedorov

On the Ice
Joined
Nov 12, 2021
Country
Russia
Yes, my dream is that one day Ё is written everywhere it is pronounced. The problem is that the letter Ё is a late addition to the Russian alphabet (18th century) because the sound change that requires it occurred very late in the language history. So it ended up with a marginal status. Most of the time you are just supposed to know where E is actually pronounced Ё. A rule has recently been introduced to write Ё everywhere where it could potentially be ambiguous, including in names, at least in texts. But when it comes to documents, the problem is that many people have Ё written as E in their birth certificated, passports etc., and you can't just change that arbitrarily or you'll have to prove to the authorities Usachёva and Usacheva are in fact the same surname.
two examples with Ё and E:

1. Ёж (hedgehog). Should be pronounced 'yozh'. But there is also a word "Ежиха" (female hedgehog), should be pronounced 'yezhikha'. And that's not all. When we talk "Ёж голоден" (the hedgehog is hungry), we use Ё. When we talk "Посмотри на ежа"(Look at the hedgehog), we use E.
2. Ёлка (fir-tree). Should be pronounced 'yolka'. But there is also a word "Ель" - it is synonymous and should be pronounced 'yel' with a soft consonant at the end. Fir branches - its "Еловые ветки" ('yeloviye vetki'), with E. But Christmas decorations on a fir - its "Ёлочные игрушки"('yolochniye igrushki'), with Ё.
 
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