Skates and coaching for a beginner

JulianBridi

Spectator
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Hi! I've started figure skating with a coach only a few days ago and I have had two lessons so far. I really do enjoy it but my rental skates hurt my ankles a lot and they just don't feel right. That's why I'm wondering if I should consider buying my own skates, even though I really can't tell if I'll be enjoying figure skating for a longer period of time because I have a history of losing interest in a sport after 6-12 months. If so, how much money should I spend on my first skates and if not, how long should I wait until I by my first pair of skates? I'd also like to know how often I should skate a week and of those times, how often with a coach, considering I also want to go to the gym at least 3-4 times a week, which takes up lot of time.

Personal Info:
Male
14 yo
174 cm
about 60 kg
I use orthopedic insoles in my normal shoes (don't know if that's relevant)
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
Hi! I've started figure skating with a coach only a few days ago and I have had two lessons so far. I really do enjoy it but my rental skates hurt my ankles a lot and they just don't feel right. That's why I'm wondering if I should consider buying my own skates, even though I really can't tell if I'll be enjoying figure skating for a longer period of time because I have a history of losing interest in a sport after 6-12 months. If so, how much money should I spend on my first skates and if not, how long should I wait until I by my first pair of skates? I'd also like to know how often I should skate a week and of those times, how often with a coach, considering I also want to go to the gym at least 3-4 times a week, which takes up lot of time.

Personal Info:
Male
14 yo
174 cm
about 60 kg
I use orthopedic insoles in my normal shoes (don't know if that's relevant)

You should be having about one lesson a week with a coach, maybe add on LTS if you want more lesson time.
A couple hours a week practicing.

Definitely get a beginner pair of skates because the rental ones at the rink are trash and very painful and they aren't always sharpened properly or enough.

A figure skating fitter (not a hockey fitter at a rink) can help you with seeing what fits your foot as far as a beginner skate. All brands fit different types and shapes of feet.

You will be fine with a recreational set for now. If you end up staying with the sport then you can get something better later. Also, make sure you let them know that you use orthotics in your normal street shoes, that will come into play with skates.

Good luck!
 

JulianBridi

Spectator
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
You should be having about one lesson a week with a coach, maybe add on LTS if you want more lesson time.
A couple hours a week practicing.

Definitely get a beginner pair of skates because the rental ones at the rink are trash and very painful and they aren't always sharpened properly or enough.

A figure skating fitter (not a hockey fitter at a rink) can help you with seeing what fits your foot as far as a beginner skate. All brands fit different types and shapes of feet.

You will be fine with a recreational set for now. If you end up staying with the sport then you can get something better later. Also, make sure you let them know that you use orthotics in your normal street shoes, that will come into play with skates.

Good luck!

Thanks, helps a lot!
 

sandraskates

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 31, 2006
Country
United-States
You could also ask the coach if there are any good, slightly used pairs of skates that you could try on. Some rinks or club members keep a closet of used items, however men's boots (black) will likely be fewer.
Don't buy online! Take your orthopedic soles with you when you see the fitter.
There might also be a coach that is a dealer for a boot manufacturer that could get you a good starter pair of skates (Jackson makes a reasonably priced starter product).
 

JulianBridi

Spectator
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
You could also ask the coach if there are any good, slightly used pairs of skates that you could try on. Some rinks or club members keep a closet of used items, however men's boots (black) will likely be fewer.
Don't buy online! Take your orthopedic soles with you when you see the fitter.
There might also be a coach that is a dealer for a boot manufacturer that could get you a good starter pair of skates (Jackson makes a reasonably priced starter product).

Thanks!
 

tstop4me

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 2, 2015
Caveat. Yes, bring your orthotics to the skate fitter and make him aware of any foot problems. But be aware that orthotics are customized for a particular activity (e.g., walking vs. running vs. skating). In particular, the foot mechanics of skating are substantially different from those of walking, so your existing orthotics most likely will not be suitable for use in skating boots.
 

JulianBridi

Spectator
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Caveat. Yes, bring your orthotics to the skate fitter and make him aware of any foot problems. But be aware that orthotics are customized for a particular activity (e.g., walking vs. running vs. skating). In particular, the foot mechanics of skating are substantially different from those of walking, so your existing orthotics most likely will not be suitable for use in skating boots.

Oh okay, so should I visit my doctor and ask him for skating specific orthotics?
 

tstop4me

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 2, 2015
Oh okay, so should I visit my doctor and ask him for skating specific orthotics?
Start with the skating tech (ask coaches and advanced skaters for a referral) first to see how severe your problems are. If they are not too severe, you might be able to get by with non-prescription orthotics. *If* you need prescription orthotics, you need to see a podiatrist with specific experience in fitting orthotics for figure skates. Depending on where you live, qualified, experienced podiatrists might be hard to find.
 

JulianBridi

Spectator
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Start with the skating tech (ask coaches and advanced skaters for a referral) first to see how severe your problems are. If they are not too severe, you might be able to get by with non-prescription orthotics. *If* you need prescription orthotics, you need to see a podiatrist with specific experience in fitting orthotics for figure skates. Depending on where you live, qualified, experienced podiatrists might be hard to find.

Ah okay. thanks!
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Canada
Oh okay, so should I visit my doctor and ask him for skating specific orthotics?

You'll need orthotics for your skates specifically. That is what I meant in my first post, I have to have separate ones for skates and shoes. I told you to bring them to your fitting so they can judge based on your foot issues and needing orthotics in your shoes. You can be directed towards a boot and then will have to see a foot doctor for ones to fit your skates.

Good luck!
 
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