Unusual or Funny Names, Your Stories? | Golden Skate

Unusual or Funny Names, Your Stories?

el henry

Fangirl of men’s spirals and split jumps
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the usual final pas de deux? anyway i like this choice


unrelataed to fs but Philip Philips parents have no heart :LOL:

That may in fact be a stage name.

But for real, my aunt's father's name was Henry Henry. They actually named their first son Henry Henry Jr. (these are Henry's by marriage, not Henry's by blood relations. At least I have that:laugh:)
 

Ic3Rabbit

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That may in fact be a stage name.

But for real, my aunt's father's name was Henry Henry. They actually named their first son Henry Henry Jr. (these are Henry's by marriage, not Henry's by blood relations. At least I have that:laugh:)
That is his birth name. Philip LaDon Philips Jr.
 

anonymoose_au

Insert weird opinion here
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But for real, my aunt's father's name was Henry Henry. They actually named their first son Henry Henry Jr. (these are Henry's by marriage, not Henry's by blood relations. At least I have that:laugh:)
That's hilarious! At least they don't just keep adding Henrys to the name - Henry Henry Henry.

We have a famously corrupt cop here in Australia who's name is Roger Rogerson, no wonder he turned to crime.
 

skylark

Gazing at a Glorious Great Lakes sunset
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That may in fact be a stage name.

But for real, my aunt's father's name was Henry Henry. They actually named their first son Henry Henry Jr. (these are Henry's by marriage, not Henry's by blood relations. At least I have that:laugh:)
:laugh:

I visited friends years ago in Louisiana, Cajun country. The conversation turned to names and the remarkable number of men named Hebert. Then, they said the name Hebert Hebert wasn't uncommon. One lucky customer's parents named him Hebert Hebert Hebert.

Hm. Fabled or not? Maybe it's something about names that start with "H."

OT. I simply could not resist.
 

CaroLiza_fan

EZETTIE LATUASV IVAKMHA
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That's hilarious! At least they don't just keep adding Henrys to the name - Henry Henry Henry.

We have a famously corrupt cop here in Australia who's name is Roger Rogerson, no wonder he turned to crime.

I was going to suggest Robbie Robertson, guitarist with The Band. But then I found out that "Robbie" was a nickname derived from his surname.

So, I'll instead go with writer Jerome K. Jerome. (Depending on how you look at it, the initial in the middle either spoils the effect, or adds to it! :laugh: )

henry squared :oops::D:ROFLMAO:

Off topic, but that comment reminds me of a guy that I went to school with.

During in our first year at High School, we had a PE class in one of the assembly halls. He fell, and because of the accoustics of the hall, there was a massive "boom" that echoed through the hall.

As a result, he became known as "Boom Boom". Which eventually evolved into "Boom Squared".

Minor was my mother's maiden name

There was a fellow on that side of my family named Major Minor.

Major was his first name, not an army rank. :LOL:

When I read that name, my first thought was of two cars from British car company Morris Motors:

Morris Major
Morris Minor

Which in turn led me to think of somebody with a funny name. Former England rugby player Austin Healey.

And the reason it is funny is that Austin-Healey (with a hyphen) is the name of another British car company!

What were his parents thinking?! I can only imagine the bullying he got from the other kids when he was at school! :drama:

That's why I get angry whenever celebrities give their kids silly names. Because, due to no fault of their own, those poor kids are going to be made fun of for the rest of their lives. Unless, of course, they decide to change their names.

CaroLiza_fan
 

dorispulaski

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I once went to a UVM Classics Department party at the home of Prof. Francis Bliss and his wife Frances Bliss. They called each other Fran and Franny. One of the Bliss 19th century progenitors was Freelove Bliss.

A discussion of odd names was bound to happen, so of course it did. After many names were mentioned, Franny Bliss said the oddest name she had ever seen was Revilo Oliver. One of the graduate students thought that was not so odd.

Franny gave a little "Bless Your Heart" twinkle and said in her Southern accent, "Well, dear, the Oliver's had 10 or so children. They couldn't think of a name for the last child, so they named him Revilo. Revilo is Oliver spelled backwards."

The Oliver's were so fond of this palindromic name that they visited it on the eldest boy for a number of generations. The Revilo Oliver of the Bliss's era was a classical philologist, and not a nice man.

 
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ladyjane

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My stepmother's first husband, as well as my step siblings, used to have a surname which roughly translates into 'lots of little sh*ts' (sorry, but that really was the name). Needless to say, they had an official name change.
 
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el henry

Fangirl of men’s spirals and split jumps
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To explain further why Henry Henry is not a blood relative.

Henry is my last name by birth, it is not Spousal Unit's last name.
I have Henry’s on all sides of my family. My maternal grandmother was born Anna Henry. She married Mr. Q and had two children, Daughter Q (my mother) and Son Q. (my uncle) *Both* children married Henry’s. None of the Henry’s are otherwise related.

Henry Henry is from my uncle’s wife’s family. We wouldn’t do that:laugh:

And also, with all that, how could I not use my real last name as my screen name? :biggrin:
 

skylark

Gazing at a Glorious Great Lakes sunset
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My Uncle Fred used to tell the story of a very rich, very prominent family from Arkansas or Texas surnamed Hogg. I've since learned that Hogg is in fact a legitimate last name in the U.S. and in Britain. I think I half doubted it when I was a child.

But Fred said, of this rich family, that they named their daughter "Ima."

I really didn't believe it and thought it was a joke, but as an adult I realized that that sort of cruel behavior on the part of parents does exist. Reference: the Johnny Cash song, "A Boy Named Sue."

I eventually looked up "Ima Hogg," and she was a real person. Lived in Texas.
 
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skylark

Gazing at a Glorious Great Lakes sunset
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What were his parents thinking?! I can only imagine the bullying he got from the other kids when he was at school! :drama:

That's why I get angry whenever celebrities give their kids silly names. Because, due to no fault of their own, those poor kids are going to be made fun of for the rest of their lives. Unless, of course, they decide to change their names.

And it's not just celebrities. There was a discussion a couple years ago in a group. One lady said she'd never live in Denmark because there was a legal list of given names citizens could give their children, and only those given names were legal. I was curious, and from my reading, that seems correct. Someone from Denmark please correct me if I'm wrong or if my information is incomplete.

Anyway, the lady in question was incensed. She declared that if she wanted to name her child "Ugly Flower," it was her right to do so.

If I'm reading it correctly, the intention of the law is to protect children from that kind of emotional abuse, eventual bullying, and shame. So I say, Bravo!
 
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iluvtodd

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My Uncle Fred used to tell the story of a very rich, very prominent family from Arkansas or Texas surnamed Hogg. I've since learned that Hogg is in fact a legitimate last name in the U.S. and in Britain. I think I half doubted it when I was a child.

But Fred said, of this rich family, that they named their daughter "Ima."

I really didn't believe it and thought it was a joke, but as an adult I realized that that sort of cruel behavior on the part of parents does exist. Reference: the Johnny Cash song, "A Boy Named Sue."

I eventually looked up "Ima Hogg," and she was a real person. Lived in Texas.
"Ima" (pronounced ee' ma) in Hebrew means "mommy!"

There was/is (?) a judge in Philadelphia, PA named Judge Goodhart. He would officiate @ many civil ceremony weddings on Valentine's Day (and would be shown on the local news while conducting the ceremonies).
 
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