US Championship Series - Henderson, Nevada | Golden Skate

US Championship Series - Henderson, Nevada

gsk8

Record Breaker
Joined
Jun 21, 2003
Country
United-States
Last edited:

dorispulaski

Wicked Yankee Girl
Joined
Jul 26, 2003
Country
United-States
Henderson does not start till Oct. 12

USFS does not put up the results till closer to the event
 

ice coverage

avatar credit: @miyan5605
Record Breaker
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Henderson start orders/results will be here:


Individual links to start orders/results pages for all events in Championship Series are already shown on the Competition Central page.




Results/Entries

Starr Andrews scored over 79 in the SP to crush the competition at this event.

I believe that was at the competition in Blaine, MN.

Yes, it was Blaine where Starr won the SP yesterday -- with a score of 70.10.
 

CoyoteChris

Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
1Katie Freter, Vegas Golden Knights Center of Excellence
2Alena Budko, Winterhawks FSC
3Caroline Harris, Los Angeles FSC
4Lisa Borzilleri, Los Angeles FSC
5Ashlyn Huber, Seattle SC
6Allison Zheng, Peninsula SC
7Bow Bagley, Dakotah FSC
8Hanna Harrell, SC of Boston
9Mariah Bell, Rocky Mountain FSC
10Andee Lyons, FSC Of Park City
11Alex Evans, Los Angeles FSC
12Katherine Ong, All Year FSC
13Kailey Wistort, Coyotes SC of Arizona
14Aubrey Ignacio, All Year FSC
Senior ladies
 
Last edited by a moderator:

el henry

Fangirl of men’s spirals and split jumps
Record Breaker
Joined
Mar 3, 2014
Country
United-States
Andrew :(

Maybe I'll catch Bow Bagley and her program choreo by Jason Brown. :) I forget if it's the SP or the LP.
 

CoyoteChris

Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
Not to worry. They maintain an archive.
FYI the replays appear soon after the comp and you just go to the comp and hit the replay button. Then, you can jump ahead 6 minutes through warmups and 20 min through ice resurficing. If you go to far, its simple to go back a few minutes as there is a time bar like Youtube. I am a bad person as when I watched the Free Skates of the senior ladies in MN, I just started at the halfway point in the comp. Quality on the big screen and audio is really very good. The only negative thing I have to say is that I am not smart enough to back out of one comp and go to the next, so I end up backing out to the "sports" button and scrolling down to the next comp.
Quality of camera work is very good.
skating.jpg
 

CoyoteChris

Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
So I was watching Int. Ladies Group C on my computer tonight and chatting with my friend A.C. over FB who was sitting in the audience with the Alia Edwards family. A.C. also skates. It occured to me looking at the numbers of Int. Ladies at this event vs the numbers of Novice vs the numbers of Jrs that this is a very hard sport and that the big step is to make it past Int. ...Is that true that it is hard to go up from Int.? (I tried to get A. C. to tell Todd Eldridge that if this sport were easy, they would call it "golf" but she wouldnt do it..... (Todd likes golf):rofl:
 

gkelly

Record Breaker
Joined
Jul 26, 2003
It occured to me looking at the numbers of Int. Ladies at this event vs the numbers of Novice vs the numbers of Jrs that this is a very hard sport and that the big step is to make it past Int. ...Is that true that it is hard to go up from Int.?
Yes, there is big jump in difficulty between intermediate and novice in the US.

At the test level, the novice Moves in the Field test has the lowest passing rate because it is significantly more difficult than the intermediate MIF test. Once a skater masters the new skills required on the novice test, they are more likely to be able to get through the junior and senior MIF tests.
Also, the the minimum jump requirements for the intermediate freeskate test are only one double jump (performed alone and in combination -- the combination can be double+single), whereas the minimum requirements for the novice freeskate test are three different doubles and a double-double combination. Higher difficulty is welcome but not required for the tests.

At the competitive levels, intermediates only need two doubles for their short programs. Most attempt all doubles up to lutz, but not always cleanly. The really competitive intermediates, who tend to be younger, will include double axels and/or one or more triples, but the majority of teen competitors at intermediate level do not.

For novice competitors, the basic skating is generally stronger, the double jumps are generally cleaner and more consistent, and double axel/triple attempts are more common -- and necessary for competitive success at that level.

I.e., a skater of average ability who puts in several years of training can achieve the intermediate skill level. To get to even an average novice skill level takes more athletic talent as well as more training.

So it's not uncommon for would-be competitive skaters to quit when they get stuck trying to learn double axel, or when school becomes more important than sports for their long-term plans.
 

CoyoteChris

Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
Yes, there is big jump in difficulty between intermediate and novice in the US.

At the test level, the novice Moves in the Field test has the lowest passing rate because it is significantly more difficult than the intermediate MIF test. Once a skater masters the new skills required on the novice test, they are more likely to be able to get through the junior and senior MIF tests.
Also, the the minimum jump requirements for the intermediate freeskate test are only one double jump (performed alone and in combination -- the combination can be double+single), whereas the minimum requirements for the novice freeskate test are three different doubles and a double-double combination. Higher difficulty is welcome but not required for the tests.

At the competitive levels, intermediates only need two doubles for their short programs. Most attempt all doubles up to lutz, but not always cleanly. The really competitive intermediates, who tend to be younger, will include double axels and/or one or more triples, but the majority of teen competitors at intermediate level do not.

For novice competitors, the basic skating is generally stronger, the double jumps are generally cleaner and more consistent, and double axel/triple attempts are more common -- and necessary for competitive success at that level.

I.e., a skater of average ability who puts in several years of training can achieve the intermediate skill level. To get to even an average novice skill level takes more athletic talent as well as more training.

So it's not uncommon for would-be competitive skaters to quit when they get stuck trying to learn double axel, or when school becomes more important than sports for their long-term plans.
Thank you very much for taking your time here and putting out a great explaination. Since 2007 I have watched many Novice comps but very few Int. ones. Watching my friend AC post vids almost daily of all the hard work and practice has given me an appreciation of what dedication of all that hard work really means. It is a tough sport and sometimes a cruel one. My wife is very competitive and has represented the US at Worlds in her sport. I am completely non competitive in my sport but enjoy it none the less. Hats off to all the figure skaters who put in so much of themselves.....
AC, You GO, Girl! See you in Vegas.
ac.jpg
 
Top