what is actually achievable starting during teenage years | Golden Skate

what is actually achievable starting during teenage years

viamarkable

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 11, 2021
hi all

i'm 12, going on to 13 in a few months, and I just want to know what is a reasonable expectation for how far i can progress.
about 4-5 years ago, i started skating in LTS. a month or so before the pandemic, i passed freeskate 1 at my rink. then covid happened, and I stopped skating for 2 years. Now, I'm coming back, and my parents also realize that fs is a sport that i really want to do. so they agreed to get me a private coach (bc the rink stopped holding group lessons for freeskate 1+). for me at least, if i want to do something, i do it well. but because of that I set expectations quite high. I watched a video on youtube where the person said that they started skating at 12, and seriously at 13. by 15 they were working on 2A. Is this legitimately possible? if so, what about after doubles? is it possible to get some triples?
Also, what should I look for in a coach? bc i'm not sure where to start looking, and my mom says once u get a coach its hard to switch. does anyone know any good coaches in the bellevue/seattle, WA area? tysm
 

Ic3Rabbit

Patineuse élite et professionnelle
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Country
Olympics
hi all

i'm 12, going on to 13 in a few months, and I just want to know what is a reasonable expectation for how far i can progress.
about 4-5 years ago, i started skating in LTS. a month or so before the pandemic, i passed freeskate 1 at my rink. then covid happened, and I stopped skating for 2 years. Now, I'm coming back, and my parents also realize that fs is a sport that i really want to do. so they agreed to get me a private coach (bc the rink stopped holding group lessons for freeskate 1+). for me at least, if i want to do something, i do it well. but because of that I set expectations quite high. I watched a video on youtube where the person said that they started skating at 12, and seriously at 13. by 15 they were working on 2A. Is this legitimately possible? if so, what about after doubles? is it possible to get some triples?
Also, what should I look for in a coach? bc i'm not sure where to start looking, and my mom says once u get a coach its hard to switch. does anyone know any good coaches in the bellevue/seattle, WA area? tysm

Don't be in a hurry w/progress and really get your skills correctly. That is the basis for everything. You may get some doubles, but triples are doubtful. You can skate up through adulthood and compete in local and adult competitions after your teens.
As far as coaches, try here http://www.highlandskatingclub.org/membership/pro-corner/
 

viamarkable

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 11, 2021

silver.blades

Medalist
Joined
Jan 4, 2007
Country
Canada
When you're looking for a coach, consider the following:
  • What is their focus (freeskate, dance, skills) and pick one that aligns with the discipline that interests you the most.
  • Think about personality, both yours and the coaches. Are you someone who needs a coach who is touch and direct, or do you do better with someone who is really positive and nurturing? My first coach was a good coach, but she was too nice for me. I was a wild child and I walked all over her. I did much better when I changed to a coach who was strict and forceful.
  • If you can, talk to other skaters at your club about their coach's style of teaching to get a sense of the ones you're considering.
  • Don't be afraid to talk to the coaches to see what they're like and if you get along.
  • Talk to your club director or administrator. My club matches skaters and coaches based on who they think will be a good fit.
  • See if the coaches are open to a trial lesson. No commitment past the first lesson or two, just to see if you fit.
Most importantly, while your mom isn't wrong that it can be hard to switch coaches, don't be afraid to switch if you aren't getting what you need from your coach. It can be a scary thing to do and some coaches make it difficult, but most are professionals who understand that skaters come and go. Also, chances are that if the coach isn't working for you that they can sense it and the lessons aren't really working for them either.
 

viamarkable

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 11, 2021
When you're looking for a coach, consider the following:
  • What is their focus (freeskate, dance, skills) and pick one that aligns with the discipline that interests you the most.
  • Think about personality, both yours and the coaches. Are you someone who needs a coach who is touch and direct, or do you do better with someone who is really positive and nurturing? My first coach was a good coach, but she was too nice for me. I was a wild child and I walked all over her. I did much better when I changed to a coach who was strict and forceful.
  • If you can, talk to other skaters at your club about their coach's style of teaching to get a sense of the ones you're considering.
  • Don't be afraid to talk to the coaches to see what they're like and if you get along.
  • Talk to your club director or administrator. My club matches skaters and coaches based on who they think will be a good fit.
  • See if the coaches are open to a trial lesson. No commitment past the first lesson or two, just to see if you fit.
Most importantly, while your mom isn't wrong that it can be hard to switch coaches, don't be afraid to switch if you aren't getting what you need from your coach. It can be a scary thing to do and some coaches make it difficult, but most are professionals who understand that skaters come and go. Also, chances are that if the coach isn't working for you that they can sense it and the lessons aren't really working for them either.
Thank you, I will take into consideration all these factors. I used to do LTS lessons, all the way up until Freeskate 1. Was going to do the rest, (they had a different group for lessons Freeskate 1-6), but then Covid hit, and now the second group doesn't exist anymore. So basically, I have experience with (I think), 5 out of the 7 coaches at my rink. a friend of mine has a different coach, so I kind of do know about the teaching styles. For me myself, I know that I almost always work best under pressure, so I'd rather have a stricter coach, but most of the coaches at my rink aren't really pushy (especially the ones that I've had firsthand experience with). thank you again!
 

viamarkable

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 11, 2021
so. i was skating at an outdoor rink the other day, and there was a hired skater there. she helped me w/ my spins and i found out she coaches but was an ice dancer. she was really helpful, and later, i contacted her and asked her a bunch of questions. she doesn't skate at my home rink, but i am willing to drive to where she skates. she's doesn't do trial lessons but i did kinda have a trial lesson when we met at the outdoor rink. my main concern is that she is an ice dancer, but im interested in singles skating. also, what is around an average price per hour rate for coaches?
 

silver.blades

Medalist
Joined
Jan 4, 2007
Country
Canada
so. i was skating at an outdoor rink the other day, and there was a hired skater there. she helped me w/ my spins and i found out she coaches but was an ice dancer. she was really helpful, and later, i contacted her and asked her a bunch of questions. she doesn't skate at my home rink, but i am willing to drive to where she skates. she's doesn't do trial lessons but i did kinda have a trial lesson when we met at the outdoor rink. my main concern is that she is an ice dancer, but im interested in singles skating. also, what is around an average price per hour rate for coaches?
Just because a skater was an ice dancer doesn't mean they can't also be a good singles coach and vice versa. I'm a former freeskater, but I also coach dance and the club I work at considers me an ice dance coach. There are also former ice dancers that I work with who coach almost exclusively singles. Most coaches have skated in all the disciplines at some level and most countries require coaches to train to teach all disciplines to become coaches.

I say if you think the coach was a good fit and she's able to take you on as a skater, go for it. Worst case, it doesn't work out and you find another coach in the future. Even if it doesn't work out long term, the basics you can get from working with an ice dancer can only help with the free skating.

As to the cost of coaching, it's highly variable between countries, cities, rinks and coaches. Always best to ask the coach you're interested in working with.
 
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viamarkable

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 11, 2021
Just because a skater was an ice dancer doesn't mean they can't also be a good singles coach and vice versa. I'm a former freeskater, but I also coach dance and the club I work at considered me an ice dance coach. There are also former ice dancers that I work with who coach almost exclusively singles. Most coaches have skated in all the disciplines at some level and most countries require coaches to train to teach all disciplines to become coaches.

I say if you think the coach was a good fit and she's able to take you on as a skater, go for it. Worst case, it doesn't work out and you find another coach in the future. Even if it doesn't work out long term, the basics you can get from working with an ice dancer can only help with the free skating.

As to the cost of coaching, it's highly variable between countries, cities, rinks and coaches. Always best to ask the coach you're interested in working with.
ok. thank you so much for the advice. she used to be a single skater. i asked for cost and she said price for 1 hour is $100, so i'm a bit hesitant on that. i don't know much about private lesson prices for fs, but i do know that 100 for an hour a way more that my piano lesson LOL
 

Elija

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 25, 2019
ok. thank you so much for the advice. she used to be a single skater. i asked for cost and she said price for 1 hour is $100, so i'm a bit hesitant on that. i don't know much about private lesson prices for fs, but i do know that 100 for an hour a way more that my piano lesson LOL
That is at the higher end but still within the normal range - the price can vary a lot depending on experience, location and qualifications, but I would say anything from about $50-$120 and hour is normal. Then you of course have ice time on top of that. Figure skating is unfortunately a very expensive sport!
 
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