What is an arabesque as opposed to a spiral?

Sam L

Medalist
Joined
Mar 23, 2014
In the Technical Panel Handbook for singles skating in choreographic sequence it says:

"A Choreographic Sequence consists of any kind of movements like steps, turns, spirals, arabesques, spread eagles, Ina Bauers, hydroblading..."

Are they just saying spiral or am I missing something here?

Reason I ask also is that I can do everything off this list now except my hydroblading isn't low or good enough but it is there.
 

Clarice

Rinkside
Joined
Mar 26, 2005
The definition of a spiral in the USFS rule book is "a position with one blade on the ice and free leg (including knee and foot) higher than the hip level." Based on that, I would say that an arabesque is a particular spiral position. I couldn't find a specific definition of "arabesque" in the rule book.
 

Sam L

Medalist
Joined
Mar 23, 2014
The definition of a spiral in the USFS rule book is "a position with one blade on the ice and free leg (including knee and foot) higher than the hip level." Based on that, I would say that an arabesque is a particular spiral position. I couldn't find a specific definition of "arabesque" in the rule book.

Neither could I.

Refer to this link for description of different spirals: http://gofigureskating.com/skills/spirals/intro.html. The arabesque spiral is one particular type of spiral.

That's just the default spiral in that description. It's what everyone thinks of when you say spiral. In fact, it says "An arabesque spiral is the basic spiral position." I'm just wondering if they meant something else by Arabesques.

I mean, in ballet, there are specific positions for Arabesques first, second, third etc... which are different to spiral positions but only due to the positions of the arms. I don't think this is what this is talking about though.
 

sandraskates

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 31, 2006
Country
United-States
In the Technical Panel Handbook for singles skating in choreographic sequence it says:

"A Choreographic Sequence consists of any kind of movements like steps, turns, spirals, arabesques, spread eagles, Ina Bauers, hydroblading..."

Perhaps the use of the word "spirals" refer to all the other spirals listed in the link provided tstop4me (catch foot, Biellmann, Kerrigan, etc).

I've always associated Arabesque = spiral (the basic 90 degree angle leg position).
 

cl2

Final Flight
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
The definition of a spiral in the USFS rule book is "a position with one blade on the ice and free leg (including knee and foot) higher than the hip level." Based on that, I would say that an arabesque is a particular spiral position. I couldn't find a specific definition of "arabesque" in the rule book.

If we go by the definition, then that would exclude spiral-like positions where the free leg is not higher than hip level, either by mistake or by design. I can imagine choreography that includes transient moves with free leg extended behind straight or bent, maybe body more upright than a usual spiral, which makes it harder to attain the free-leg-higher-than-hip requirement, that should still be considered a legitimate part of the sequence.

My guess is that including "arabesque" in the list of choreographic moves is a catch-all term to account for those different possibilities.
 

Ducky

On the Ice
Joined
Feb 14, 2018
Technically a spiral is supposed to be on an edge, since the name comes from if you were to hold the edge long enough you would make a spiral pattern. An arabesque would be that position but on a flat edge, not the spiral edge.
 

silver.blades

Medalist
Joined
Jan 4, 2007
Country
Canada
I would assume they mean a dance arabesque like this where the body remains upright. It is probably a separate element because the leg does not need to be higher than the hip to achieve an arabesque position.
 

Sam L

Medalist
Joined
Mar 23, 2014
Perhaps the use of the word "spirals" refer to all the other spirals listed in the link provided tstop4me (catch foot, Biellmann, Kerrigan, etc).

I've always associated Arabesque = spiral (the basic 90 degree angle leg position).

I know what you're saying but it doesn't make sense as to why they would separate this.

Technically a spiral is supposed to be on an edge, since the name comes from if you were to hold the edge long enough you would make a spiral pattern. An arabesque would be that position but on a flat edge, not the spiral edge.


I would assume they mean a dance arabesque like this where the body remains upright. It is probably a separate element because the leg does not need to be higher than the hip to achieve an arabesque position.

I can't see this image. I think it's a combination of the leg not needing to be higher than hip and not needing to hold for a long time on an edge. Perhaps that is what they're talking about. But then this becomes really just a connecting movement and perhaps not long enough? I suppose spreadeagles don't have be either.
 

Mathman

Record Breaker
Joined
Jun 21, 2003
I know what you're saying but it doesn't make sense as to why they would separate this.

It's possible that this is just ISU-speak. Many of their official documents are put together by a committee. It can be a head-scratcher when you actually try to figure out what they mean.
 
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