Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 97

Thread: Is there an ideal "figure" in figure skating?

  1. #61
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Icey View Post
    Figures aren't done anymore. lol
    And it's a shame.

    And yep, the body types which provided advantages there were completely different.

  2. #62
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    190
    lovelly skinny body type and long lines .. POLINA KOROBEYNIKOVA

  3. #63
    Custom Title Rachmaninoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    593
    I think this was mentioned earlier (too lazy to wade through the entire thread) but there are two kinds of "weight talk" when in figure skating: the kind that speculates about its relationship to the technical side of things (so-and-so might have an easier time rotating with her jumps if she took off a few pounds) and the kind that's really more about aesthetics (so-and-so should lose weight to look more attractive and graceful).

    Of the two, the first type doesn't bother me at all. In fact, I often wish people would be less sensitive about it, that we could discuss it the same way we could discuss jumping technique or music choices. The laws of physics are present regardless of anyone's feelings, and in most sports, there are certain physical characteristics that the most successful athletes tend to have. Yeah, there's a range of bodies that can succeed rather than one exact "perfect" one, and technique can count for a lot, and with the new code there's a number of different ways to rack up points so there might be more leeway for different body types. But still, most skaters will struggle if their body fat percentage or overall size gets past a certain point (which is different for different skaters). For all the body comparisons people love to do (usually of female skaters, I can't help but notice), these athletes would look relatively small and thin when seen in the flesh, even the "heavy" or "thick" ones. The skaters that get called heavy might look that way relative to other skaters, but no one would be describing them that way after seeing them in a university lecture, or at a shopping mall, for example. So yes, it appears it skating does favour the small and thin, especially in women/girls.

    The second type of weight talk does bother me, though: the idea that to be pleasing to watch, to be considered truly artistic, a female skater needs to be slender and ballerina-like. I do think it's a sign of body prejudice, the meaning we've learned to associate with different body types. These ideas and attitudes are cultural, they're learned, and most people absorb them to some extent. A gymnastics columnist last year spoke of something similar in that sport, how the descriptors of "athletic" and "artistic" have become almost code for describing a gymnast's body type, and how the more willowy-figured gymnasts have an easier time being seen as artistic than the ones with stronger, more muscular builds.

    Shawn Johnson Retires: How Gymnastics Talks About Bodies in Code

    I think she hits it right on the head in these places, and that these observations can apply to female figure skaters, also:

    In theory, artistry should describe a quality of movement, a connection between the performer's limbs, the music, and the audience. But somehow, the short, stocky gymnasts...rarely get credit for that je ne sais quoi.
    Plenty of lean, flexible gymnasts have nothing in common with dancers in terms of musicality and interpretation. We call them artistic because we can as easily imagine them in a tutu as in a leotard.

  4. #64
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas, United States
    Posts
    4,959
    Quote Originally Posted by luisARG View Post
    lovelly skinny body type and long lines .. POLINA KOROBEYNIKOVA
    She looks great on the ice, but the jumps aren't so great now that she's grown taller. Polina Korobeynikova's body build - a couple of inches in height would be an ideal figure for a ladies skater.

  5. #65
    Custom Title plushyfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2,687
    Quote Originally Posted by silverlake22 View Post
    She looks great on the ice, but the jumps aren't so great now that she's grown taller. Polina Korobeynikova's body build - a couple of inches in height would be an ideal figure for a ladies skater.
    Is she taller, like Carolina? I don't think..Both have beautiful bodies..

    the new Russian rithmic gymnast world champion..she has a beautiful body for RG. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uppAiAhr4ks
    Thank God the skaters don't have to be so thin ..

  6. #66
    :) aftertherain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,346
    Quote Originally Posted by plushyfan View Post
    the new Russian rithmic gymnast world champion..she has a beautiful body for RG. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uppAiAhr4ks
    I hear familiar music!

    What happened to the 2012 Olympic silver medalist? (I think her name was Daria Dmitrieva or something?)

  7. #67
    Custom Title plushyfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2,687
    Quote Originally Posted by aftertherain View Post
    I hear familiar music!

    What happened to the 2012 Olympic silver medalist? (I think her name was Daria Dmitrieva or something?)
    yes...not once...

    Yes, you remember very well. Probably she is retired, she was all around silver medalist, but she won the clubs final...that's not bad.. beautiful woman http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9A9Qxn9fpVU

  8. #68
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    7,378
    Quote Originally Posted by plushyfan View Post
    Is she taller, like Carolina? I don't think..Both have beautiful bodies..

    the new Russian rithmic gymnast world champion..she has a beautiful body for RG. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uppAiAhr4ks
    Thank God the skaters don't have to be so thin ..
    she's too thin for singles maybe ice dancing
    an ideal singles skater can be tall or short but ideally should be narrow like taller skaters Mao or Yuna, or average girls with petite frame like Sasha or Julia
    too much body excess like Tuktamysheva or Flatt can cause problems, their weight issues needs to be addressed

  9. #69
    :) aftertherain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,346
    Quote Originally Posted by plushyfan View Post
    yes...not once...

    Yes, you remember very well. Probably she is retired, she was all around silver medalist, but she won the clubs final...that's not bad.. beautiful woman http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9A9Qxn9fpVU
    I thought she won the ribbons final. And I think I only remember because she beat Kanaeva in some event in the qualification round and some people were like, "Oh no! Kanaeva is losing her touch!"

  10. #70
    Custom Title plushyfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2,687
    Quote Originally Posted by aftertherain View Post
    I thought she won the ribbons final. And I think I only remember because she beat Kanaeva in some event in the qualification round and some people were like, "Oh no! Kanaeva is losing her touch!"
    You are right. she won the ribbon final, I checked it.

  11. #71
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,785
    Sorry in advance for a complete off-topic, but I love your avatar, aftertherain!!!

  12. #72
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Texas, United States
    Posts
    4,959
    Quote Originally Posted by plushyfan View Post
    Is she taller, like Carolina? I don't think..Both have beautiful bodies..

    the new Russian rithmic gymnast world champion..she has a beautiful body for RG. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uppAiAhr4ks
    Thank God the skaters don't have to be so thin ..
    Polina K. is somewhere between 168 cm and 170 cm, so yes, she is one of the tallest skaters in the field like Carolina (listed as either 169 cm or 170 cm). In metric that's 5'6" to 5'7", so for a ladies skater, Polina K. is definitely on the tall end, although there do seem to be more tall female skaters doing well these days (interesting how the ladies are getting taller but most of the men doing well are still short, or average height at most, save Lysacek).

  13. #73
    :) aftertherain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,346
    OT:

    Quote Originally Posted by deedee1 View Post
    Sorry in advance for a complete off-topic, but I love your avatar, aftertherain!!!
    Oh, thanks!

    If anyone wants any, I've got a few extra that I made (but ultimately didn't choose) lying around. Just let me know!

  14. #74
    Custom Title
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,495
    It occurs to me that some of the idealization of certain body types is also the style of the time. On TV they showed a few scenes showing Leslie Caron, who was chosen by Gene Kelly to costar with him in An American in Paris. Caron, still a teenager at that time, was a genuine ballerina, trained in Paris. If you look at her figure in any of her early films, one thing is obvious: she does not have the kind of curveless body idealized by Balanchine. She is very trim, but she has hips. So did many of the dancers of the time. And it's not as if ballet was less demanding in those days than it later became. this was just the style of the time. So I'm wondering whether there is not more leeway than we imagine in skaters' shapes as well. Of course today's skaters have to do triple-triples and whatnot, but I think we've proven by looking at Harding, Ito, and others that natural spring is not necessarily gifted only to sylphs.

  15. #75
    At the rink. Again. mskater93's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,201
    Quote Originally Posted by Rachmaninoff View Post
    Of the two, the first type doesn't bother me at all. In fact, I often wish people would be less sensitive about it, that we could discuss it the same way we could discuss jumping technique or music choices. The laws of physics are present regardless of anyone's feelings, and in most sports, there are certain physical characteristics that the most successful athletes tend to have. Yeah, there's a range of bodies that can succeed rather than one exact "perfect" one, and technique can count for a lot, and with the new code there's a number of different ways to rack up points so there might be more leeway for different body types. But still, most skaters will struggle if their body fat percentage or overall size gets past a certain point (which is different for different skaters).
    I think all discussion of weight should be highly discouraged. Skating has LONG, LONG, LONG been a sport rife with eating disorders (same as wrestling and gymnastics). When you start discussing a 14, 15, 16 year old girl (and there's a large number of them at high levels in this sport) who may be reading fan message boards like this, when people start throwing "fat", "wide", "needs to lose weight" around and they potentially read it, it's going to start distorting their body image. That's when you end up with skaters eating one small meal a day or restricting calories to some ridiculously small amount (a couple hundred calories a day), because OMG, people said I was fat. Someone who's a high level athlete should be at a higher than starvation number of calories a day. A lot of times, when "fans" start with the "skater X needs to lose weight", it's a girl who's proportions are shifting and turning into a woman. It can't be helped during puberty, it just happens, and that little extra goes away if the skater continues on a HEALTHY diet and caloric intake. In addition, there are a number of "fans" who are downright cruel about it and think that anyone who wouldn't look like a concentration camp refugee in person is fat.

    Truthfully, a couple extra pounds will not make a difference in whether a skater fully rotates a jump. I've seen "wider" skaters in the adult ranks who land big, beautiful double jumps well into their forties and fifties (who are only praticing 4-5 hours a week, so not elite time commitment) and they are able to do that because they have good jumping technique and proper timing. Some of the greatest lady jumpers in history were smaller in stature but incredibly muscular (Ito, Harding).

Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •