2019-20 U.S. Ladies Figure Skating

mrrice

Record Breaker
Joined
Jul 9, 2014
i have to admit i've had the same thoughts...

it's one thing to be 100% in shape, but a totally different thing when you're still trying to work your way back. i hope she isn't discouraged and will pick up where she left off.

if theres one thing we know, it's that Gracie is the one we can count on to get back up. she is the most resilient of all :)

I love this comment!!
 

MarinHondas

Final Flight
Joined
Aug 29, 2016
It must be nice to step on the ice after two months and land a 3F-3T in your first training session. Hopefully everyone gets their jumps back just as fast.

I think as long as skaters are doing proper off ice training, jumps shouldn’t be toooo difficult to get back. It might feel funky at first but you don’t lose years of training just from being off the ice for 2 or 3 months. The biggest issue would be running programs I think, because it’s rather difficult to replicate this off ice. I doubt there will be a GP season though, so :shrug:
 

Toshsk8

Spectator
Joined
Aug 12, 2014
What exactly did Alysa Liu tweet that’s got some people harassing her? I can’t find anything. What’s going on?

And how does Karen Chen have ice on the floor in her home??

I obviously have too much time on my hands, but why is it that Starr Andrews always has custom made costumes by Lisa McKinnon (super expensive) but I hear so much chatter that she can’t afford a better choreographer and coach? I’m confused. I’d actually rather have her go to a top tier coach instead of buying expensive costumes, but I’m not in control of her budget.


Why does Starr have custom made costumes that are made by Lisa? Probably because her mom, coaches, and Starr herself love the quality and designs set forth by Lisa. To merge design with the selected music is essential to her team. And we like her work! To Bluediamonds09 and everyone else that want to know why Starr have the same coaches? Let me set the record straight. Every elite coach is not a guarantee that a student will make it to the top of the food chain. What may work for someone else, may not necessarily work for Starr. Many coaches have different techniques. Two styles blended together can either ruin a student , or help them become successful. I have watched and could mention many other talented athletes that “run to the hill” approach on choosing top of the food chain coaches that are presently nowhere to be found, or simply plagued with injuries. It’s a gambled risk either way. We love our coaching team! We have added Frank Carroll as a consultant toward the end of last season which showed an added promise as well. Looking at Starr’s track record and what she’s achieved within the past four years, I personally feel she’s progressive. Maybe not on the level of what “the public” expects, but on a level that will give her longevity in the sport where most girls have shorter shelf lives. She is truly the story of the turtle and the rabbit. Another factor, Withstanding puberty with a 20 pound weight gain was also extremely difficult from December 2017 through 2018-2019 season. Her underrotations and inconsistency reflected that. Starr is also tiny. You cannot pound a body frame weighing under 100 pounds with hours and hours a day of training without raising the risk for injury.
Starr is an amazing human being who has beat the odds of living in a difficult climate, being less than 1% of African descent in figure skating, all while traveling to competitions. I believe she will metamorphosize into that beautiful butterfly, peaking at the right time. With the current pandemic, although tortuous and scary, it has allowed these young bodies to rest, reflect, and be thankful for their experiences and hopefully return stronger and excited of the sport we all love so much, figure skating!!
 

mrrice

Record Breaker
Joined
Jul 9, 2014
Normally, this would be off topic but, since we're not getting any live skating I was wondering if there are links that show Bradie or Mariah training on or off ice.
 

Skater Boy

Record Breaker
Joined
Feb 24, 2012
I love this comment!!

I think Gracie is trying hard but most resilient I am not so or at least she should share that honour Nothing against Gracie and I hope she will succeed whatever that means but she also had the most help. There are probably other skaters who wanted to do a come back but did not get the support. Despite Gracie's fall from grace so to speak or down the world and american ladder she has had great financial support, public support emotionally and financially, sponsors etc. Not saying it is isn't deserved but many a skater with talent does not have such support to make dreams or comebacks more likely to happen. I hope we see Gracie and GAbby Daleman duke it with their glorious spirit and jumps.
 

drivingmissdaisy

Record Breaker
Joined
Feb 17, 2010
I think Gracie is trying hard but most resilient I am not so or at least she should share that honour Nothing against Gracie and I hope she will succeed whatever that means but she also had the most help. There are probably other skaters who wanted to do a come back but did not get the support. Despite Gracie's fall from grace so to speak or down the world and american ladder she has had great financial support, public support emotionally and financially, sponsors etc. Not saying it is isn't deserved but many a skater with talent does not have such support to make dreams or comebacks more likely to happen. I hope we see Gracie and GAbby Daleman duke it with their glorious spirit and jumps.

Gracie will always have public support, because her story is so relatable to anyone who has struggled with eating disorders, tried to meet unrealistic expectations, etc. She's the last serious gold medal contender we've had, so that adulation is certainly earned IMO. I do think the financial support will dry up unless her results get a lot better, which is fair because anyone who doesn't advance past Nationals gets forgotten the rest of the season as the bigger events begin. She should take comfort in knowing that, even though she hasn't been training, she isn't falling further behind because her competitors have been off the ice too.
 

skylark

Gazing at a Glorious Great Lakes sunset
Record Breaker
Joined
Aug 12, 2014
Why does Starr have custom made costumes that are made by Lisa? Probably because her mom, coaches, and Starr herself love the quality and designs set forth by Lisa. To merge design with the selected music is essential to her team. And we like her work! To Bluediamonds09 and everyone else that want to know why Starr have the same coaches? Let me set the record straight. Every elite coach is not a guarantee that a student will make it to the top of the food chain. What may work for someone else, may not necessarily work for Starr. Many coaches have different techniques. Two styles blended together can either ruin a student , or help them become successful. I have watched and could mention many other talented athletes that “run to the hill” approach on choosing top of the food chain coaches that are presently nowhere to be found, or simply plagued with injuries. It’s a gambled risk either way. We love our coaching team! We have added Frank Carroll as a consultant toward the end of last season which showed an added promise as well. Looking at Starr’s track record and what she’s achieved within the past four years, I personally feel she’s progressive. Maybe not on the level of what “the public” expects, but on a level that will give her longevity in the sport where most girls have shorter shelf lives. She is truly the story of the turtle and the rabbit. Another factor, Withstanding puberty with a 20 pound weight gain was also extremely difficult from December 2017 through 2018-2019 season. Her underrotations and inconsistency reflected that. Starr is also tiny. You cannot pound a body frame weighing under 100 pounds with hours and hours a day of training without raising the risk for injury.
Starr is an amazing human being who has beat the odds of living in a difficult climate, being less than 1% of African descent in figure skating, all while traveling to competitions. I believe she will metamorphosize into that beautiful butterfly, peaking at the right time. With the current pandemic, although tortuous and scary, it has allowed these young bodies to rest, reflect, and be thankful for their experiences and hopefully return stronger and excited of the sport we all love so much, figure skating!!

I love this whole post!

Personally, I already feel that this year the philosophy of patient, steady work shows beautifully in Starr's performances. And it's clear that she has invested in being an artist in the sport we all love so much. (1) Longevity, so that she can create a body of work (and so that we fans can enjoy her longer) and (2)progressing in expressiveness, as a performer ... those two values are more important to me than whether someone is seen as a so-called "gold medal contender" or whatever. And no one can predict ... those qualities of Starr, plus never quitting, could result in results that no one can predict now. History proves it: Ashley Wagner earned her longevity, owns a gorgeous, irreplaceable body of work, and grew as an artist and performer. Plus, she's still the only ladies' World Medalist that the US has, since Kwan/Cohen/Meissner era.
 

mrrice

Record Breaker
Joined
Jul 9, 2014
I love this whole post!

Personally, I already feel that this year the philosophy of patient, steady work shows beautifully in Starr's performances. And it's clear that she has invested in being an artist in the sport we all love so much. (1) Longevity, so that she can create a body of work (and so that we fans can enjoy her longer) and (2)progressing in expressiveness, as a performer ... those two values are more important to me than whether someone is seen as a so-called "gold medal contender" or whatever. And no one can predict ... those qualities of Starr, plus never quitting, could result in results that no one can predict now. History proves it: Ashley Wagner earned her longevity, owns a gorgeous, irreplaceable body of work, and grew as an artist and performer. Plus, she's still the only ladies' World Medalist that the US has, since Kwan/Cohen/Meissner era.

I think it will be interesting to see how Starr does now that she's a fulltime Senior. I've always enjoyed her skating but, I still see her in 4th position. Alysa, Mariah, and Bradie have the tech and performance skills to keep them ahead of Starr unless she makes some serious changes. The fact that she is older than Alysa makes me think her goal should be a podium finish which would be amazing.
 

skylark

Gazing at a Glorious Great Lakes sunset
Record Breaker
Joined
Aug 12, 2014
I think it will be interesting to see how Starr does now that she's a fulltime Senior. I've always enjoyed her skating but, I still see her in 4th position. Alysa, Mariah, and Bradie have the tech and performance skills to keep them ahead of Starr unless she makes some serious changes. The fact that she is older than Alysa makes me think her goal should be a podium finish which would be amazing.

My mind has been sticking on an idea, and you've given me a good opportunity, mrrice! So, every time I hear a Russian skater asked what their goal/goals are, whether they're single skaters or pairs, they say their only goal is to skate as well as they can. And if pressed, I've heard some say that they're not thinking of (that year's) Worlds, or Olympics. They say they're only focusing on performing as well as they can for the competition at hand.

It's not only the Russian skaters who respond to the question that way, but I notice many seem to have been taught to respond that way. Even though they might say every athlete wants to do what they see others doing, and even though there's a strong emphasis on winning, not just placing. I can't help thinking that the skaters I've heard say this are benefiting from the repetition in their own heads, and hearing the repetition from coaches as well, that they just want to skate their best. Another example: that's what Charlie White has said, that he always tried to think of doing what he could control, skating as well as he could, and letting the chips fall where they may.

Well, maybe it's just a personal choice. And maybe I relate more to the idea of "perform my best" than to set a goal and then be disappointed if I did well but didn't meet that specific goal. I remember hearing Gracie Gold say in an interview in late 2015 that she wanted to win Worlds 2016 in Boston, and that if she finished 4th she'd consider it a failure. That comment of hers has haunted me.

So, if anyone has thoughts? I'd be interested in hearing them.
 

macy

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 12, 2011
My mind has been sticking on an idea, and you've given me a good opportunity, mrrice! So, every time I hear a Russian skater asked what their goal/goals are, whether they're single skaters or pairs, they say their only goal is to skate as well as they can. And if pressed, I've heard some say that they're not thinking of (that year's) Worlds, or Olympics. They say they're only focusing on performing as well as they can for the competition at hand.

It's not only the Russian skaters who respond to the question that way, but I notice many seem to have been taught to respond that way. Even though they might say every athlete wants to do what they see others doing, and even though there's a strong emphasis on winning, not just placing. I can't help thinking that the skaters I've heard say this are benefiting from the repetition in their own heads, and hearing the repetition from coaches as well, that they just want to skate their best. Another example: that's what Charlie White has said, that he always tried to think of doing what he could control, skating as well as he could, and letting the chips fall where they may.

Well, maybe it's just a personal choice. And maybe I relate more to the idea of "perform my best" than to set a goal and then be disappointed if I did well but didn't meet that specific goal. I remember hearing Gracie Gold say in an interview in late 2015 that she wanted to win Worlds 2016 in Boston, and that if she finished 4th she'd consider it a failure. That comment of hers has haunted me.

So, if anyone has thoughts? I'd be interested in hearing them.

i have noticed this as well especially with Russian skaters. i think it puts things into a much more realistic and doable perspective than risking not meeting your goal of winning/placing, and considering it a failure.

it is much more productive to focus on what you can control than what you can't.

honestly i wish this would have understood this better as a competitor.
 

skylark

Gazing at a Glorious Great Lakes sunset
Record Breaker
Joined
Aug 12, 2014
i have noticed this as well especially with Russian skaters. i think it puts things into a much more realistic and doable perspective than risking not meeting your goal of winning/placing, and considering it a failure.

it is much more productive to focus on what you can control than what you can't.

honestly i wish this would have understood this better as a competitor.

As a figure skating competitor? Why do you think so many skaters do set a goal, then? Is it a style of coaching that says that's the best way to get results? I understand that it's good to have something to aim for. But I wonder if the damage to confidence makes it a risky proposition.

I'm so glad you answered and gave your perspective. :thank: I can relate to this in other aspects of life, but I've never been a figure skater.
 

macy

Record Breaker
Joined
Nov 12, 2011
As a figure skating competitor? Why do you think so many skaters do set a goal, then? Is it a style of coaching that says that's the best way to get results? I understand that it's good to have something to aim for. But I wonder if the damage to confidence makes it a risky proposition.

I'm so glad you answered and gave your perspective. :thank: I can relate to this in other aspects of life, but I've never been a figure skater.

yes, as a figure skating competitor. i was never a skater that went anywhere but trying to think back it seems my coaches leaned more towards results based goals, obviously skating well being part of it. a lot of it was also my own inability to handle competition nerves and internal goals i'd set for myself for getting on the podium or trying to make a final round etc and it almost always backfired. i remember always being so nervous thinking about whether or not i would skate well (being a good competitor is part of it too, but that's a different topic). when you're a kid you always want to do your best but you have no idea if your goals are counterproductive and then you don't understand whats happening when you keep missing. i think it would have been really beneficial if someone would have drilled that what's important is worrying about what i can control into my head as a young skater (i started at 7) and not being so results oriented.
 

brightphoton

Medalist
Joined
Jan 23, 2009
Skating your best is a noble goal, but perhaps it's a luxury for people who are both skating their best *and* winning medals. It reminds me of Meagan Duhamel, who in 2016 proclaimed that this season, her goal was to "have fun." I suspect she and Eric Radford were feeling triumphant, unstoppable, a bit arrogant (?), as they had just won a second gold medal for pairs at the world championships. But at the 2017 Worlds, they placed 7th, with a fall, shaky landings on a few jumps, and out-of-sync spins. You could see the disappointment on their faces. But why should they be disappointed? After all, didn't they achieve their goal of having fun?

A few months later, Meagan and Eric fired their coach. She talked about their poor results and needing a change. She also talked about the concrete results that she wanted, and made it clear that 7th place was definitely not good enough.

"If we didn’t make these changes we’ll probably find ourselves in seventh place at the Olympics. By going ahead and making these changes, we’re giving ourselves a chance to improve and reach the podium," said Duhamel. "We might also end up seventh at the Olympics even though we’re making these changes, but it’s the risk we needed to take."

At the 2018 Olympics, they got a gold team medal for Canada and a bronze individual medal
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cgu2CCmCOcA
 
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