COVID-19: Coping and Social Distancing

TontoK

Hot Tonto
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Joined
Jan 28, 2013
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United-States
We do agree that the capacity to transact business online and the capacity to even access the internet is not at all equal. Trying to hard to stay within the boundaries here, in my state, much of the pushback is from a "Don't Tread on Me" perspective and not from insufficient resources perspective, so that colored my response.

The current crisis brings those insufficient resources home. :(

Around here, the main concern I hear is about job security. Many neighbors have been laid off and their small businesses shuttered. For sure, there's a bit of "Get the Government Off My Back" but the economic concerns are the greatest.

Again, we are relatively (not completely) unaffected, so far at least, by the virus, and I am thankful for that.

I pray for those in worse circumstances.
 

CoyoteChris

Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
It is getting quite nit-picky and convoluted in Michigan. Marijuana is "essential" but only for curb-side pickup. No instore sales.

Liquer stores are "essential" and open. But restaurants cannot include alchoholic drinks even as part of take-out meals. (In fact, a group of restaurant owners has sued the governor over this, suit pending.)

On today's news they showed some rallies against the governor, complete with "Lock her up" chants. Some bar patrons were recently fined $1000 apiece for not following the rules (whatever they are?) about drinking in bars.

I think the bottom line is that the state government is committed to stopping people from gathering together in violation of social distancing guidelines. It's not so much whether marijuana or liquor is essential or not, but rather, how to keep people from massing together to buy these commodities.

I think Nevada tried closing the pot and booze shops.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/busin...ss-at-liquor-stores-pot-dispensaries-1984451/

Here in WA , Pot is considered a medical necessity by some and our pot shops are open. Small stores like booze stores in WA have limits as to how many people can be in at once, like the big stores here. Liquer and pot bring in big tax money into WA. Bars rightly are closed...(.like a bunch of drunken patrons in some countries are gonna obey a mythical 3 ft rule!)

Lotto tickets are sold at a separate counter in my grocery store and patrons are doing a good job in all lines of keeping social distance.

I would imagine Lotto tickets bring in big tax money.

I see very sad sights in the stores...in one store, someone brought in the whole family, including grandma, and a 9 year old boy with an uncontrolble cough....(I left)
Most people in my area are playing by the rules and dare I say it, politeness has gone up.
I dont understand those underground nightclubs in San Fransisco....CBS news showed a group of folks going door to door in the South (rough) side of Chicago passing out cards against gun violence and covid rule cards. Some of the people said they didnt believe in Covid. It wasnt real.... :noshake:
 

CoyoteChris

Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
Around here, the main concern I hear is about job security. Many neighbors have been laid off and their small businesses shuttered. For sure, there's a bit of "Get the Government Off My Back" but the economic concerns are the greatest.

Again, we are relatively (not completely) unaffected, so far at least, by the virus, and I am thankful for that.

I pray for those in worse circumstances.

I KNOW! Nearly half of all Americans live paycheck to paycheck. I wince every time the news says the economy is strong. Think about the poor waitress with two kids who is waiting to get on unemployment and food stamps and aid for her kids. I think us kids of depression era parents were lucky enough to learn financial hygene. I didnt start out my adult life with a credit card and a fancy truck. You would laugh if you saw the 8x35 dilapidated old travel trailer in the junk heap trailer park I started life in. The working poor of this country are hurting till those checks start coming. The news (used) to say the economy is roaring back from the great recession. Yet in Spokane schools, 60 percent of the kids have to be feed breakfast and lunch cause the parents cant or wont feed them. Yes, there are many who are far far worse off...look at the food bank lines....:disapp:
https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/nearly-half-americans-live-paycheck-to-paycheck-bank-survey
 

CoyoteChris

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Joined
Dec 4, 2004
A question for our non-US forum members. How are you coping? I am not well traveled and our news talks very little about you. Do you have trouble getting unemployment? Long lines at food banks? Confusing sets of distance / essential standards from district to district? Are your farmers plowing under crops cause they cant sell them ? Do your children have to go to School twice a day to pick up "grab and go" bags for breakfast and lunch?
 

dorispulaski

Wicked Yankee Girl
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Joined
Jul 26, 2003
Country
United-States
Mass is down there at 42 degrees North....I am up at about 49 but I will take some of Doris' suggestions!

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/planting-zones/washington-planting-zones.htm

It is important to know what planting zone you are in as to what will grow and in your area. Washington is very complex that way, because it is large and has coastline (a moderating influence) and mountains (a complicating influence).

If you are in the USA and want your planting zone, this nice site lets you look at state micro climates
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/planting-zones/usda-planting-zone-map.htm

Seed catalogs and plant catalogs (and in this modern era, websites that sell plants and seeds) generally tell you what particular zone a particular variety of plant will thrive in.

For example, the Northern Reliance Peach does well in Colchester, VT, whereas a regular peach would not.

Shopping for correct varieties can expand the types of vegetables you can grow.
 
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dorispulaski

Wicked Yankee Girl
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Jul 26, 2003
Country
United-States
The CT . rules are much more lenient - if a store sells food, is a pharmacy, or a hardware store, it is open. If it is open, you can buy anything in the store.

So Dollar Stores and Job Lots Stores are open. Wal-Mart is open. So you can buy pretty much anything.

However, the store is on the hook to limit the number of customers at any one time and to ensure the shoppers stay 6 feet apart, both while shopping and in checkout, and so forth. But Rules evolve daily.

Grocery stores have senior shopping hours very early in the day. This lets seniors shop when the store is at its cleanest and among other folk that are severely quarantined.

Tomorrow there might be more rules.

https://portal.ct.gov/Coronavirus

Bars are closed. Restaurants are take out only.
 
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TallyT

Here for the High Lord of Extra
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Joined
Apr 23, 2018
Country
Australia
A question for our non-US forum members. How are you coping?

I'm feeling extremely lucky to the point of guilty - as I mentioned elsewhere, I actually went on my long service leave end of March, which means I am at home, as I fully expected (okay, turns out more than I expected) on full pay, till early next year. I'm in rural Australia, far less impacted than the coastal cities, the number of infected is very low. Sure, I can't go out much, but given that I share a quarter-acre block to be restricted to with my sister, I can't complain.

The government have thrown their 'solve the deficit' mantra out the window and allocated massive amounts for people who normally wouldn't be eligible to apply for benefits: the website crashed at first but from what a relative whose childcare shift work is impacted says, it's up and not too hard to apply for. Long lines at the supermarket rather than food banks, the early panic buying is coming under control and we haven't found it hard to get everything we need and most of what we want (though the pasta everyone is leaving is... we're not there yet). The travel/supply regs come mostly from the state governments, who are being quite strict: you need a good reason to be out and about (exercise, going to shops etc are considered good). On the other hand, quite a few shops I would have thought would close are still open, if monitoring how many enter. Masks not considered necessary, I've seen a few, but very few.

Farmers are still suffering from and battling the long drought (which now looks like breaking, we've had good rain for two weeks), so there are few crops to plow under. A lot of people, including farmers, didn't even get time to draw breath and recover from the bushfires, the money raised there is still being given out. As for schools, they've been on extended term break and the federal and state governments are still squabbling about when they should reopen...
 

Jaana

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Joined
Jul 27, 2003
Country
Finland
TontoK is complaining that the government has declared by fiat that lotto tickets are "essential purchases," like milk and bread. They are not. By pushing such an obvious lie, the government diminishes its moral authority and risks losing the the support and cooperation of the populace.

Here one can do lotto online and of course at so-called R-kiosk, too. R-kiosk is a kind of all-purpose-store: You can buy e.g. little take-away-food, coffee, sodas and various food-stuff in packages, post a package or receive one, etc. You can also buy time or load money on your bus card. At least the one in our local shopping center is open in normal times.

A month ago I was there and bought time on my bus card for several months.
 

dorispulaski

Wicked Yankee Girl
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Jul 26, 2003
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United-States
Russia sounds like Italy and NYC. They have run out of PPE. They have run out of beds. They are running out of ventilators.

“It’s hard to say how many [Covid-19] patients we actually have because we don’t test any of the patients,” said Alexei Veselkov, 23, a student working in First Moscow State Medical University’s Clinical Hospital no. 3.

Trump says he is going to send Russia ventilators...
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...united-states-if-needed-kremlin-idUSKCN21Y1I5

It does not sound good.
https://www.businessinsider.com/cor...rs-say-government-is-covering-up-cases-2020-3
 

Edwin

СделаноВХрустальном!
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Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Russia’s situation and prognosis was to be expected, but powers in charge chose to pursue their own agenda.

Several Italian gymnasts have lost family members to Covid-19 related complications, no doubt Italian skaters too. Bergamo is their center after all.

We can only hope Russian skaters, their parents, chiefs of staff and rink directors adhere to measures and apply common sense.

The Novogorsk incident proves this is difficult.

The incompetence and ineffectiveness of Moscow’s QD curfew passes proves the powers in charge have a completely different view of reality.

Resorting to spraying disinfectant and orders to use face masking is only to make the authorities look like they are taking charge or ‘are in control of the situation’, while independent news sources tell otherwise.

Social distancing, self isolation and strict adherence to hygiene are better, but this requires effort, determination and endurance, and of course money in your bank account to cope with not being able to work normally.

The current news and increasingly available scientific prospects don’t give rise to great optimism regarding society returning to normal anytime soon.

Sports, as an accessory and diversion, for some a profession, is in a difficult position for sure.
 

Ducky

On the Ice
Joined
Feb 14, 2018
I think Nevada tried closing the pot and booze shops.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/busin...ss-at-liquor-stores-pot-dispensaries-1984451/

Here in WA , Pot is considered a medical necessity by some and our pot shops are open. Small stores like booze stores in WA have limits as to how many people can be in at once, like the big stores here. Liquer and pot bring in big tax money into WA. Bars rightly are closed...(.like a bunch of drunken patrons in some countries are gonna obey a mythical 3 ft rule!)

Technically in NYC in order to order booze from a restaurant or bar (take out only) it must be sold with food... but I can't tell if they're actually enforcing it because a lot of places around Prospect Park in Brooklyn are selling to-go-cocktails, beer and wine by themselves. The bougie wine stores are all online ordering. There is one non-bougie liquor store that I believe it still open. Considering that it's one of those liquor stores where there is bulletproof glass separating patrons from the staff, they're probably one of the few "essential employees" who don't have to worry about getting Covid from customers.

Otoh, it's kind of like we're living in White Claw land (ain't no laws when you're drinking white claw) because a few days ago there was a woman on the street openly announcing she had edibles for sale.

Honestly, considering that for most people pot makes them relaxed and lazy it seems like a really good drug to be on to encourage staying at home.
 

CoyoteChris

Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
Technically in NYC in order to order booze from a restaurant or bar (take out only) it must be sold with food... but I can't tell if they're actually enforcing it because a lot of places around Prospect Park in Brooklyn are selling to-go-cocktails, beer and wine by themselves. The bougie wine stores are all online ordering. There is one non-bougie liquor store that I believe it still open. Considering that it's one of those liquor stores where there is bulletproof glass separating patrons from the staff, they're probably one of the few "essential employees" who don't have to worry about getting Covid from customers.

Otoh, it's kind of like we're living in White Claw land (ain't no laws when you're drinking white claw) because a few days ago there was a woman on the street openly announcing she had edibles for sale.

Honestly, considering that for most people pot makes them relaxed and lazy it seems like a really good drug to be on to encourage staying at home.

I wonder if all those Michigan rioters are off pot?
 

Ducky

On the Ice
Joined
Feb 14, 2018
I wonder if all those Michigan rioters are off pot?

They seem to be the type of people who have never "done the marijuana" before (as my mom non-ironically calls it) but definitely could use some right now.

Congrats to the Michigan rioters whose protest will counter-productively lead to their Stay-at-Home order going on longer.

And UUUUGGGGHHHHHHHH NY's Stay-at-Home order is now going to last another month. On the bright side, my little bankers still have OT meals to expense and I have another month to continue my during working hours core strengthening drills. On the minus side... I just really want to see my friend, Kyle, in person.
 

CoyoteChris

Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/planting-zones/washington-planting-zones.htm

It is important to know what planting zone you are in as to what will grow and in your area. Washington is very complex that way, because it is large and has coastline (a moderating influence) and mountains (a complicating influence).

If you are in the USA and want your planting zone, this nice site lets you look at state micro climates
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/planting-zones/usda-planting-zone-map.htm

Seed catalogs and plant catalogs (and in this modern era, websites that sell plants and seeds) generally tell you what particular zone a particular variety of plant will thrive in.

For example, the Northern Reliance Peach does well in Colchester, VT, whereas a regular peach would not.

Shopping for correct varieties can expand the types of vegetables you can grow.

Micro climates in the Spokane area are many and varied due to elevation changes and glacial trenches that funnel cold air from Canada.
On the Map posted, you will see Spokane, at 1900 ft along the river. Much warmer than I am on the west plains at 2350 ft. Coure D'alene is colder than I am cause they are at the bottom of the Purcell trench.
http://www.naturallynorthidaho.com/2012/12/mountains-moved-to-form-purcell-trench.htm

Oddly, Green bluff is the home of many fruit farms and orchards. 2310 ft. But 10 miles away in Deer Park, they get lots of snow and cold due to being at the bottom of another glacial trench.
People are mowing their thick green grass in Spokane...here on the west plains NW of Spokane, I probably have a week to go before I think about it....just two weeks difference in the growing season can mean the difference between being able to grow full sized early girl tomatoes or not. Tomatoes dont like cold feet. Put them in the ground with a soil temp of 40 degrees and they just scowl at you. All sorts of ways to warm their feet, of course.
 

dorispulaski

Wicked Yankee Girl
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Jul 26, 2003
Country
United-States
Underhill Center (the cold pocket :laugh: at the foot of Mt. Mansfield where we had a huge vegetable garden ) would be zone 4b. Colchester where we had the peach tree was zone 5a.
 

NanaPat

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Oct 25, 2014
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Canada
Here in Canada, rules vary from province to province. Ontario has a long list of "essential businesses" that is getting shorter daily. Canadian Tire (essentially a large hardware chain + tires and car service) has been shut down in Ontario, and they have gone online with curb-side pickup. Their website is suffering from excess traffic. They are still open here in BC.

In BC, some types of businesses where social distancing is impossible have been shut down (hairdressers, yoga studios, gyms, tattoo parlors, most dentists, eat-in restaurants, bars, etc). Also, gatherings of people over a certain number (I think it's currently 50) have been outlawed. Most other businesses are allowed to open but have operate in a safe manner, and our "accepted distance" is 2m (a little over 6 feet), though in some cases it's more aspirational than enforced.

I live in a small tourist town, and businesses have reacted differently to the restrictions. We walked around downtown, which is now practically deserted and read the notices: many businesses are closed, some are by appointment only, some have drastically reduced hours, some allow only one customer in the store at a time, etc. The large grocery stores and drug stores are still open, and I am afraid that when this is all over, we'll all be shopping at WalMart and SuperStore cause those are our only choices.

We are getting take-out food from a small local restaurant, cause we want it to be there when we can finally "dine out". I went to the local sewing store during one of the two mornings a week that it's open; I told the proprietor what I was there for; he put on his mask and came out from behind the desk to get the item and confirm that it was what I wanted; I paid (by tapping my VISA card) and I left. Again, I want them to survive, as they always have excellent suggestions for what I need, often items I didn't even know existed.

There are special programs for the suddenly unemployed and under-employed. Those are federal. They are essentially handing out money based on self-reporting, but will verify eligibility and claw it back from those who over-collected come tax time in April, 2021.
 

TontoK

Hot Tonto
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Joined
Jan 28, 2013
Country
United-States
<snips follow>

The large grocery stores and drug stores are still open, and I am afraid that when this is all over, we'll all be shopping at WalMart and SuperStore cause those are our only choices.

We are getting take-out food from a small local restaurant, cause we want it to be there when we can finally "dine out". I went to the local sewing store during one of the two mornings a week that it's open; I told the proprietor what I was there for; he put on his mask and came out from behind the desk to get the item and confirm that it was what I wanted; I paid (by tapping my VISA card) and I left. Again, I want them to survive, as they always have excellent suggestions for what I need, often items I didn't even know existed.

I really dislike the large super-chain stores, but I must admit I am grateful for our local Walmart. They are operating with reduced hours, and they have a special senior-only time to help protect some of the most vulnerable. They have a large supply chain, and our little county would be in big trouble if they weren't here. They also make use of a drive-by pick up service, although I'm told it's very difficult to get a time scheduled because of the demand. That said, I still go to my locally owned grocery - it's less crowded and a quicker in-and-out. We're stocked enough at our house that we can weather a week if they're out of something we want. You actually CAN survive on rice and dried beans, although I certainly prefer not to if I can help it.

Ditto your efforts on supporting small businesses. Our locally owned gym (wonderful couple who support our community!) is closed, just like elsewhere, but I paid my monthly dues right on time. The lady cried when I slipped the envelope under the door and waved at her, and she sent the nicest note afterwards. I want this business to survive - they've given me and the community a lot. I feel like they deserve our support.
 

CoyoteChris

Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
Here in Canada, rules vary from province to province. Ontario has a long list of "essential businesses" that is getting shorter daily. Canadian Tire (essentially a large hardware chain + tires and car service) has been shut down in Ontario, and they have gone online with curb-side pickup. Their website is suffering from excess traffic. They are still open here in BC.

In BC, some types of businesses where social distancing is impossible have been shut down (hairdressers, yoga studios, gyms, tattoo parlors, most dentists, eat-in restaurants, bars, etc). Also, gatherings of people over a certain number (I think it's currently 50) have been outlawed. Most other businesses are allowed to open but have operate in a safe manner, and our "accepted distance" is 2m (a little over 6 feet), though in some cases it's more aspirational than enforced.

I live in a small tourist town, and businesses have reacted differently to the restrictions. We walked around downtown, which is now practically deserted and read the notices: many businesses are closed, some are by appointment only, some have drastically reduced hours, some allow only one customer in the store at a time, etc. The large grocery stores and drug stores are still open, and I am afraid that when this is all over, we'll all be shopping at WalMart and SuperStore cause those are our only choices.

We are getting take-out food from a small local restaurant, cause we want it to be there when we can finally "dine out". I went to the local sewing store during one of the two mornings a week that it's open; I told the proprietor what I was there for; he put on his mask and came out from behind the desk to get the item and confirm that it was what I wanted; I paid (by tapping my VISA card) and I left. Again, I want them to survive, as they always have excellent suggestions for what I need, often items I didn't even know existed.

There are special programs for the suddenly unemployed and under-employed. Those are federal. They are essentially handing out money based on self-reporting, but will verify eligibility and claw it back from those who over-collected come tax time in April, 2021.

Thanks for your input!
In the US below you its getting ugly. Idaho has few cases relative to WA, so they are making defacto bans against us WA people from visiting Idaho for the day. Many Idahoans live in Idaho and work in WA so this could get even uglier. Whats good for the Goose is good for the gander.
https://www.spokesman.com/stories/2...gP6lhb9qGC8hJ7vaoeDT9qbjcFoh8n8HxPgeDMvY35w_g
 

anonymoose_au

Making sequined tie and vest combos cool
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Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Country
Australia
A question for our non-US forum members. How are you coping? I am not well traveled and our news talks very little about you. Do you have trouble getting unemployment? Long lines at food banks? Confusing sets of distance / essential standards from district to district? Are your farmers plowing under crops cause they cant sell them ? Do your children have to go to School twice a day to pick up "grab and go" bags for breakfast and lunch?

As mentioned by TallyT the situation is Australia is pretty good all things considered. The death rate from COVID-19 here is very low, 65 deaths so far, which is tragic but when compared to just about everywhere else is almost a miracle, particularly considering a huge stuff up that allowed 2,000+ passengers disembark from a cruise ship with no health checks whatsoever.

The question right now so if cases continue to decline how exactly to ease restrictions - right now bars, clubs, beaches and sports fields are closed with restaurants only able to do takeaway. Schools are on holidays, but that ends next week. The PM said wants students to go back, but the State Premieres aren't sure it's a good idea, so it's all up in the air there.

Other good news includes the return of toilet paper to supermarket shelves! Flour and pasta still seems to be missing in action though.

There are still long lines at Centrelink (where you go if you've lost your job) which I see when I go by one of them in the bus on my way to work (luckily I not only still have my job, it's still on - I work at the library where we're currently selecting books for patrons which are then delivered to their houses).

There are some confusing rules, like no going to the park with your kids, but you're supposed to send them to school. No sitting outside on a bench but you can go to the supermarket.

All in all though, it's going pretty well.
 
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