How much harder is an axel? | Golden Skate

How much harder is an axel?

silverlily1

Rinkside
Joined
Oct 25, 2023
Last year I started working on waltz jump-backspins and waltz jump-loops from time to time, and backspin-loop exits, also just every once in a while. I've been working on off-ice axels and rotations for the past few months, and improving my back spin and scratch spins.

Today I tried going into an axel but just rotating one full rotation and exiting forward onto the one foot. The scariest part was the thought of exiting a jump forward (I never learned half jumps on the way to full rotations). It was surprisingly easy, not really requiring much in the way of *trying* to rotate or get height. I just did it from standing. How much harder is completing a full single axel? Is it really a super-difficult challenge to get that extra half rotation from that point?

I'm not actually trying it yet because I'm nervous to just try it without a coach's go-ahead at this point.

I guess I'm wondering what I'm in for.
 
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jersey1302

On the Ice
Joined
Jan 10, 2016
Country
Canada
Waltz jump is good practise for an axel. You’ll need to pull in more and snap into position for an axel which is quite different. I’d try it with a coach if possible because it’s all about technique. Don’t heave ho your self into the jump. Keep your free leg side up (side you are using leg to swing into jump) and squared and not to rotate your entire body going into jump. An axel is a ful, rotation more than a waltz jump as Waltz jump if half a rotation, axel is 1.5.
 

Diana Delafield

Frequent flyer
Final Flight
Joined
Oct 22, 2022
Country
Canada
Last year I started working on waltz jump-backspins and waltz jump-loops from time to time, and backspin-loop exits, also just every once in a while. I've been working on off-ice axels and rotations for the past few months, and improving my back spin and scratch spins.

Today I tried going into an axel but just rotating one full rotation and exiting forward onto the one foot. The scariest part was the thought of exiting a jump forward (I never learned half jumps on the way to full rotations). It was surprisingly easy, not really requiring much in the way of *trying* to rotate or get height. I just did it from standing. How much harder is completing a full single axel? Is it really a super-difficult challenge to get that extra half rotation from that point?

I'm not actually trying it yet because I'm nervous to just try it without a coach's go-ahead at this point.

I guess I'm wondering what I'm in for.
Landing a jump forward, you're in for a very good chance of tripping on your pick and doing a face plant. The same reason pairs lifts don't land forwards (not on purpose, anyway). Pleasepleaseplease stick with your waltz jump combinations until you have a coach right there explaining and monitoring your first Axel attempts :pray:.
 

silverlily1

Rinkside
Joined
Oct 25, 2023
Landing a jump forward, you're in for a very good chance of tripping on your pick and doing a face plant. The same reason pairs lifts don't land forwards (not on purpose, anyway). Pleasepleaseplease stick with your waltz jump combinations until you have a coach right there explaining and monitoring your first Axel attempts :pray:.
I'm not really sure how landing a not-axel (feels like minimal rotation) forward is any more likely to throw someone over their pick than a split jump landing or all those people who are taught to do half jumps before full jumps (or the coach asking people in group to try 1 1/2 rotation flips recently). We land forwards from various airborne movements all the time.
 

gkelly

Record Breaker
Joined
Jul 26, 2003
Those landings are onto two feet (usually the pick of one foot and a forward edge of the other foot).

Practicing that kind of landing won't teach your body how to get the weight fully over the landing foot to be able to land backward when you get the extra half rotation. Getting that weight shift while in the air is the trickiest new skill in the axel.

Were you working with a coach who suggested doing waltz jump-backspins and waltz jump-loops and backspin-loop exits? Keep working with the coach, and ask them when you're ready to try adding rotation in the air.

If possible, trying the first real axel attempts in a harness can be helpful.
 
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