2020-21 Russian Men's figure skating

AlimaAsh

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 21, 2018
Yay for Artur! I wonder if we'll see him compete before the season ends (not that he needs to though).

Does anyone know what Mark Kondratiuk is talking about in the interview? He seems like an interesting guy.
I can summarise it. Mark was talking about contemporary art hobby and also about his skating.

He talked about the fact that he likes to view, collect and periodically draw contemporary art. He talked about the meaning of contemporary art, that it is not just childlike drawings, that what matters is the idea, the context, what was happening to the artist. And if you read into the ideas the artist wanted to put in, it will all make sense.

His favourite museum is Tate Modern, he said it’s amazing, and his favourite movements are suprematism and expressionism. His favourite artist is Jean Michel Basquiat, that his later works have a lot of tragic elements in them, as though he knew of his close death.

Mark talked about how he managed to get to exhibitions. He said that he became friends with a relatively established artist, through whom he managed to get to his first exhibition. After that, he got invited to exhibitions and even made a personal exhibition.
He said his parents led him to museums when he was younger, they were trying to make him closer to art. So he started to like classical art, and then reached for the contemporary modern art by himself.

He said that he really likes Banksy. Banksy’s intentions are far from mainstream, but he became so popular, he is considered mainstream by everybody.

He said that it helps that he trains/trained with multiple national team members (Sasha Samarin, Makar, Dima Aliev). He talked about how he had to basically skip two seasons because of a knee injury. During that time, he was thinking to retire, but decided to see how it goes. Then he said that things seem to be looking up now!

Mark said that when he came to nationals, he thought that it would be great if he can skate clean and get into the top 10. So he never anticipated getting into the top 3.

Mark was asked whether he thinks he can stop here... he said that he joked about that, but that actually he wants to skate at large international competitions.

He said his favorite skaters are Yuzuru Hanyu and Alexei Yagudin.

He is still studying in school and is planning to study sport management in university. He was asked whether he was thinking of studying history of art, he said that he thought about that, but he wants to focus on sport for now.
 

Flying Feijoa

On the Ice
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Country
New-Zealand
He said that it helps that he trains/trained with multiple national team members (Sasha Samarin, Makar, Dima Aliev). He talked about how he had to basically skip two seasons because of a knee injury. During that time, he was thinking to retire, but decided to see how it goes. Then he said that things seem to be looking up now!
So glad he didn't decide to retire at that time (bet he is too)! I hope he gives us more oddball programmes in future :p

That's interesting about Makar and Dima since they're with Rukavicin in St Petersburg. Maybe he means during special camps like in summer when the Sokolovskaya and Rukavicin groups trained at the same base.
 

FelineFairy

On the Ice
Joined
Sep 13, 2020
A new interesting interview. Nikolai Moroshkin is a young skating skills coach at Moskvina school, working with her pairs and Daineko's boys. Here is a link and the translation of the second half which is more related to men. You can find the translation of the first half in the Russian pairs thread.

"WHEN I CAME TO VISIT ST. PETERSBURG, I FELL IN LOVE WITH THIS CITY. I DIDN'T HAVE ANY THOUGHTS ABOUT WORK YET, BUT I ALREADY WANTED TO LIVE ONLY THERE»
— You were born in Tolyatti, trained in Odintsovo near Moscow for several years, but you live and work in St. Petersburg as a result. How did this happen?

— When I moved to Odintsovo, I was placed in a sports apartment where Nikita Li lived, with whom I became very friendly — he was engaged in fencing. He himself is a native of St. Petersburg, came to the Moscow Region to the coach of Olympic Champions in saber Viktor Sidyak. When I came to visit St. Petersburg, I fell in love with this city. I didn't have any thoughts about work yet, but I already wanted to live only there.

After finishing my career, I thought through all the options and realized that skating is the only thing I can do. I had to connect my life with coaching, with choreography, and develop in this regard. After a couple of months of part-time work in Tolyatti, I realized that I could also try it in St. Petersburg. I talked to my favorite coach Oleg Ivanovich Sudakov about the prospects of figure skating in St. Petersburg, and he advised several options where I could apply and find out whether I was needed or not.
— ... And you turned to Yevgeny Rukavitsyn?"

- Yes, among others, there was an option to come to the "Academy of Figure Skating" in the group of Yevgeny Rukavitsyn. We talked to him, he said that several coaching vacancies had indeed opened up, and suggested that I work experimentally on a junior training group. Children of ten or twelve years old. He wanted to see how I would cope.

I had to change a lot: ice dancing and single skating are completely different systems of training of skaters. What is effective in dancing does not work for singles. They looked at me for a week and then gave me a full-time job, full time with that group, and thank you very much to Evgeny Vladimirovich for this.

At the same time I also had a private figure skating school "Iceberg", which still exists today. It belonged to me and my colleague and friend, but now I have retired from business, because the main activity takes up all the time.

- It turns out that the dream of living in St. Petersburg has mobilized all the resources of the Universe, so that you are not just in the city of your dreams, but also in one of the world's leading pair skating schools. How did you start working at Tamara Moskvina's club?

— Having worked for Yevgeny Rukavitsyn, I realized and I was also given to understand that there will be no career growth, because Yevgeny Vladimirovich has a cool young specialist Valentin Molotov. I clearly understood that my ceiling would be the UT group (first level training - "Match TV"), from where children move on, and another specialist will work with them. It didn't suit me at all as an ambitious boy. I wanted, of course, to be able to go further and develop. I left the Academy, not knowing at all what would happen next. I went to a training camp in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, had a rest. And a couple of weeks later I was invited to Moskvina school , but not to the group of pair skating, to the group of single skating run by Veronika Daineko. After a month of probation there, I was offered a full-time contract.
- The most famous single skaters with whom you are working now, are they Pyotr Gumennik and Andrew Kutovoy?

- Yes, these are our guys. Very talented, I love them. Both are good in their own way. As much as you can imagine that one person can be different from another, they show it. Working with them is a great pleasure. Really smart athletes.

— They differ not only from each other, as you said, but also, in my opinion, stand out even against the general background of our men's national team that has progressed in leaps and bounds. Everyone just fell in love with the lines of Gumennik and the artistry of Kutovoi. What is their secret?

— There are no better lines than Pyotr's, no better dancing endowment than Andrey's, I agree with you. But here you need to understand that we work with the abilities that athletes have, which the Lord God gave them. They have a clear natural talent, and we only try to develop this and guide it in the right direction. Not everything depends on us. Andrey has always been a great dancer, and we strive to show this in his programs. Peter's lines and musicality are also his gift, and he also plays the piano brilliantly, by the way. Feels the music. He worked with great choreographers, even when he was skating at Mishin's.

I would like to mention another of our boys who qualified for the Russian Junior championship — Nikolai Ugozhaev. Finally, he makes his way through the thorns to the stars to the main start of the season, because he was always close and always unlucky. He always missed the second stage of the Russian Cup, despite being on the podium at the first stage. Finally, he will be able to show himself, he already has his own small fan club (recently, a video of a clean Quad Lutz performed in training appeared on Ugozhaev's instagram. - Match TV).


"MANY COACHES DO NOT LIKE TO TAKE ATHLETES FROM THE OUTSIDE AND CHANGE THEIR TECHNIQUE. THIS IS THE LEAST REWARDING THING THAT CAN HAPPEN.»
— As a skating skills coach, please explain how to properly lace up your boots? Is it as tight as possible or rather loose? I have seen children who skate almost unlaced, but at the top level among adults, this almost never happens.

— Each athlete ties his laces as it is comfortable for him. Some people tie them tightly because they want to feel the stiffness of the boot. Someone prefers it loose, because they need the skate to be removed without much effort. But in general, the foot in the boot should be fixed well to avoid injury and achieve better sensitivity. The leg and the skate are one.

Exceptions occur in very young children who cannot bend their leg with a tightly tied boot due to their weight. But even then, not the entire boot should be loosened, but only the so-called hooks — its upper part. The place where the foot attaches to the ankle should be tightened as much as possible.

— What happens if the child will skate on straight legs? If, for example, the foot in the boot does not bend.

- He will learn the wrong skating technique. If the boot does not bend, the person will try to skate at the expense of alternative methods of maintaining balance — the butt "goes" back, the back "lies" forward.

— Can this be corrected in adulthood?

— Only with great difficulty. Therefore, many coaches do not like to take athletes from the outside and change their technique. This is the least rewarding thing that can happen in a job, because muscle memory is such a beast… Before you teach new technique, you need to understand a couple of things. Is the athlete ready to control it all the time? Breaking old habits is very difficult. Without the effort of the head, you can not manage. And you also need to understand whether the wrong technique is influenced by anatomical features.

— In our conversation today, you called yourself an ambitious boy. How far do your ambitions as a coach go?

— So that the athletes with whom I work at some point can move figure skating forward. I guess so.

— What does it mean for you to work with such a master as Tamara Nikolaevna in this regard?

- Oh, this experience is a great success in my life. Tamara Nikolaevna personifies infinite wisdom and knowledge. All I have to do is hang on to every word and let it go through me.
 
Last edited:

Flying Feijoa

On the Ice
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Country
New-Zealand
Aww, I like that he brought up Nikolai Ugozhaev in the interview :) Another promising young man in Daineko's team!

It's also interesting how he said he had to adapt skating skills from ice dance to singles. Usually we hear of singles-turned-ice dancers having a learning curve since ice dance footwork is more intricate, but maybe there are aspects of skating skills that are more relevant in singles... Jump/spin transitions, choreo sequence and whole-body movement stuff maybe? (Dunno, just guessing)
 

lariko

Medalist
Joined
Jan 31, 2019
Country
Canada
I am wondering if Danielian would have a chance to compete at the team championship they are talking about, if it is mid-February? Probably not if he only now started training?
 

MintGreen

On the Ice
Joined
May 6, 2018
I am wondering if Danielian would have a chance to compete at the team championship they are talking about, if it is mid-February? Probably not if he only now started training?
I don't think we will see Danielian in the team competition. The mens team will have the top five finishers of the nationals and Aliev according to a report. It sounds a very reasonable line up to me. By any chance, it also doesn't appear that Arthur will be ready given such a short training time.
 

lariko

Medalist
Joined
Jan 31, 2019
Country
Canada
I don't think we will see Danielian in the team competition. The mens team will have the top five finishers of the nationals and Aliev according to a report. It sounds a very reasonable line up to me. By any chance, it also doesn't appear that Arthur will be ready given such a short training time.
Yeah, that’s what I thought. Until next year then, fingers crossed 🤞 hopefully he could do some of the early season competitions?
 

lariko

Medalist
Joined
Jan 31, 2019
Country
Canada
Ah, guys, I was just thinking (promoted by Zhou’s and Naumov’s technical minimums missing this year), if Rostelecom doesn’t count, does it mean that none of the youthful challengers, i,e. Mozalev, Gumennik, Semenenko, Kondratyuk and Kovalev have senior technical minimums for any hypothetical and highly unlikely Worlds entry? Or did they have qualifying competitions?
 

flanker

Record Breaker
Joined
Feb 10, 2018
Country
Czech-Republic
Ah, guys, I was just thinking (promoted by Zhou’s and Naumov’s technical minimums missing this year), if Rostelecom doesn’t count, does it mean that none of the youthful challengers, i,e. Mozalev, Gumennik, Semenenko, Kondratyuk and Kovalev have senior technical minimums for any hypothetical and highly unlikely Worlds entry? Or did they have qualifying competitions?
The scores from the preivious season will be counted probably, as they would have qualified for this season already via their scores at JGP/junior worlds.
 

RemyRose

YOLO
Record Breaker
Joined
Dec 28, 2005
Country
United-States
Ah, guys, I was just thinking (promoted by Zhou’s and Naumov’s technical minimums missing this year), if Rostelecom doesn’t count, does it mean that none of the youthful challengers, i,e. Mozalev, Gumennik, Semenenko, Kondratyuk and Kovalev have senior technical minimums for any hypothetical and highly unlikely Worlds entry? Or did they have qualifying competitions?

All of them have senior minimums already.
 

FelineFairy

On the Ice
Joined
Sep 13, 2020
Aww, I like that he brought up Nikolai Ugozhaev in the interview :) Another promising young man in Daineko's team!

It's also interesting how he said he had to adapt skating skills from ice dance to singles. Usually we hear of singles-turned-ice dancers having a learning curve since ice dance footwork is more intricate, but maybe there are aspects of skating skills that are more relevant in singles... Jump/spin transitions, choreo sequence and whole-body movement stuff maybe? (Dunno, just guessing)
He explains that in the first part, which I posted in the Russian pairs thread. Sorry to make it inconvenient, the text is too long to go as one post.
I gathered from his words that it's mostly mental, singles and pairs have to be taught to like skating skills.
 

AlimaAsh

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 21, 2018
So glad he didn't decide to retire at that time (bet he is too)! I hope he gives us more oddball programmes in future :p

That's interesting about Makar and Dima since they're with Rukavicin in St Petersburg. Maybe he means during special camps like in summer when the Sokolovskaya and Rukavicin groups trained at the same base
Yes, he meant training camps with Makar and Dima. I think they actually held a camp for just the four of them before Russian nationals, so that could be part of why he mentioned it 😊.
 
Top