Help with "plow" stop | Golden Skate

Help with "plow" stop

rileyyskates

Spectator
Joined
Dec 31, 2023
Hey! I’m a beginner figure skater (I’ve been skating since September, and just started taking weekly private lessons at the beginning of the month). My coach says I need to learn how to stop and she’s right in case something happens on the ice and I have to stop, but when I go to do a snowplow stop, I go faster and keep moving forward like what she likes to call “caterpillar-ing” Does anyone know how to fix this/help?
 

silverlily1

Rinkside
Joined
Oct 25, 2023
Same thing. Not really sure physically what you're doing that you're hoping to fix from the way you describe it, but perhaps this can help: https://youtu.be/rhQY1_bTjVs?si=A_rr_9UNJuwtoVhM

Other than that I'm hoping your coach is helping to make suggestions on how to fix your stops, not just telling you that it's wrong. Work through the advice they give.
 

WednesdayMarch

Nicer When Fed
Medalist
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Country
United-Kingdom
Hey! I’m a beginner figure skater (I’ve been skating since September, and just started taking weekly private lessons at the beginning of the month). My coach says I need to learn how to stop and she’s right in case something happens on the ice and I have to stop, but when I go to do a snowplow stop, I go faster and keep moving forward like what she likes to call “caterpillar-ing” Does anyone know how to fix this/help?
It's all about the pressure. In a snowplow stop, you're essentially doing what it "says on the tin", that is "moving snow". Start by standing at the barrier where you can hold on, bend both knees and turn one foot so that your toes turn in and your heel out. Then very, very, very lightly move the blade forward and outwards at about a 45 degree angle, so that it just drifts over the ice for between 6 to 12 inches. You shouldn't be moving at you do this exercise, just moving that one foot. Repeat the exercise with a little more pressure each time so that you start to move snow. If your blade catches and judders, stop and start again. Increase that pressure by tiny increments each time until you feel easy with it and then up the pressure again. The aim of the exercise is to get the feeling of the amount of pressure it takes to stop. It's not something you can do immediately as you need to get the hang of the feeling. Do the exercise with one foot at a time (half snowplow) standing still and when you are comfortable with it, try it from a very slow speed. Build up the speed as you gain confidence. Eventually you can move on to both feet at the same time (full snowplow). This feeling is the basis of every single stop (with the exception of the toe scratch and the less said about that the better!) and the sooner you get the hang of it, the safer you'll be.
 
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