Virtual boot fitting | Page 2 | Golden Skate

Virtual boot fitting

pwincessonice

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 7, 2023
Hmm , I did a virtual fitting with Everglides but honestly it depends what boots are you looking for ? I got fitted for beginner boots and well to be honest when doing beginner boots I don’t think that the experience was that different from if I tried to buy it bymyself . Then again I don’t know what they were doing behind the scenes so I’m not sure .But if you are looking for a more detailed appointment then I think it might be worth it .
I just got fitted yesterday. I agree with your statement. There is not much that they can do virtually, and the fitter only answers my questions. I expect more tips and tricks or comments/suggestions on things I might not cover in my questions/couldn't think of considering the fees I paid are not cheap just for that kind of consultation (in my opinion).

However, I do think it's very helpful as I have so many questions and they can answer them all. But with everything being virtual and all I guess it will be hard if you did not do any prior research about your current situation as everyone's different.
 

pwincessonice

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 7, 2023
* You definitely don't want toe curling. If your toes curl repeatedly for prolonged periods, you could end up with medical issues with your toes.

* Note: Even if the boots are of the proper length and width, you could still have toe curling if the toebox is too high. So also take that into account when you choose your next pair of boots.

* You can mitigate the problem by filling the space above your toes with sponge foam. You'll need to play around with foam of different thickness and stiffness. Cut a piece of foam shaped to cover your toes (play around with size and shape as well). If you wear socks, slip the foam between the top of your bare toes and the inside of the sock. The easiest way to do this is to roll up the sock almost completely, with just the toe of the sock sticking out. Place the foam over your bare toes. Then slip on the toe of the sock over the foam and the bottom of your toes. Then unroll the sock over the rest of the foot. The sock will now hold the foam in position. Then insert your foot into the boot and lace up.
What is the perfect toe box width for a skater? How is it suppose to feel if you have a high toe box? Is it affected by the width of the boots?
 

Diana Delafield

Frequent flyer
Final Flight
Joined
Oct 22, 2022
Country
Canada
What is the perfect toe box width for a skater? How is it suppose to feel if you have a high toe box? Is it affected by the width of the boots?
I'm not a fitter or a coach, just a skater who's tried on and used a lot of boots over many, many years. A toe box that is the right width for *you* ( and I'm avoiding the word "perfect") will feel comfortable. Snug enough to prevent curling and wiggling of the toes, but not so snug it's painful, either at first or after skating in them for any length of time. And of course, the right shape for your foot, Egyptian or whatever, will affect the width your foot needs. If someone has the same size feet as mine but their toe slant is Greek while mine are Egyptian, then a same-size Brand X Model X boot that is just right for them will be the wrong width at the front for me.

Same for the height. If it's too low, it will rub the tops of your toes and cause blisters or calluses. Too high and there will be room for your toes to curl or clench up like a fist or wriggle. You don't want any of that. As has already been said, if the rest of the boot fits just right on your feet, but there feels like a slight gap over the top of your toes, the space can be filled in with foam. That will require carrying a constant supply of foam, though, and time spent packing it solidly every time you put the skates on or it will pack down and/or shift as you skate and need to be redone. This would be as much of a nuisance as lacing that needs retightening several times per session. Better to try on a lot of boots and let your fitter try to find the one that's just right for your feet.

The height of the toe box in a stock boot is only affected by the overall size. Unless it's a custom or customized boot, the model will have a set design and each of the measurements increases or decreases with the size of the whole boot.
 

pwincessonice

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 7, 2023
I'm not a fitter or a coach, just a skater who's tried on and used a lot of boots over many, many years. A toe box that is the right width for *you* ( and I'm avoiding the word "perfect") will feel comfortable. Snug enough to prevent curling and wiggling of the toes, but not so snug it's painful, either at first or after skating in them for any length of time. And of course, the right shape for your foot, Egyptian or whatever, will affect the width your foot needs. If someone has the same size feet as mine but their toe slant is Greek while mine are Egyptian, then a same-size Brand X Model X boot that is just right for them will be the wrong width at the front for me.

Same for the height. If it's too low, it will rub the tops of your toes and cause blisters or calluses. Too high and there will be room for your toes to curl or clench up like a fist or wriggle. You don't want any of that. As has already been said, if the rest of the boot fits just right on your feet, but there feels like a slight gap over the top of your toes, the space can be filled in with foam. That will require carrying a constant supply of foam, though, and time spent packing it solidly every time you put the skates on or it will pack down and/or shift as you skate and need to be redone. This would be as much of a nuisance as lacing that needs retightening several times per session. Better to try on a lot of boots and let your fitter try to find the one that's just right for your feet.

The height of the toe box in a stock boot is only affected by the overall size. Unless it's a custom or customized boot, the model will have a set design and each of the measurements increases or decreases with the size of the whole boot.
How much is too much wiggle room? When I tried Jackson 2000 series and RF3 yesterday, I felt like Jackson had slightly a bit more wiggle room than RF3 (Think like putting your feet flat and the toes can go upward downward more than the RF3). However, the toes in RF3 feels like they are not very flat, I feel like its slightly curling. Not uncomfortable but a little obvious of the slight curling.

All Jacksons are heat moldable at the toebox area, yes?
 

Diana Delafield

Frequent flyer
Final Flight
Joined
Oct 22, 2022
Country
Canada
How much is too much wiggle room? When I tried Jackson 2000 series and RF3 yesterday, I felt like Jackson had slightly a bit more wiggle room than RF3 (Think like putting your feet flat and the toes can go upward downward more than the RF3). However, the toes in RF3 feels like they are not very flat, I feel like its slightly curling. Not uncomfortable but a little obvious of the slight curling.

All Jacksons are heat moldable at the toebox area, yes?
I don't think anyone can get that specific about wiggle room. I'd say you shouldn't be able to lift your toes up so that their undersides come right off the boot "floor", nor should you be able to grip with your toes so that the ball of your foot lifts off. If you're only feeling a very slight difference between the two, then base your decision on other fit factors than just the toes. Walk around in the boots, hop, squat, hold onto something so you can lean as if on the inside or outside edge if there was a blade attached. See which boot feels more comfortable all over.

I used to wear Jacksons until they changed the last and it no longer suited my foot. The whole boot was heated, and then I put them on and went through the motions I just described, with a bit more emphasis on jumping straight up from a deep knee bend because I'm a pairs skater. I need a lot of spring in my skates for lifts and throws. But I worked the warm boots for ten to twenty minutes and then gave them back to the technician for blade fitting and they were always fine after that. I started skating in the era when boots didn't have padded linings and there was no such thing as heat molding. You went through agony with a new pair for weeks with blisters, bleeding, and other torments until you had them softened up enough inside. Maybe the newer generations of boots are so much better I'm just grateful to leave that breaking-in torture behind and am not inclined to be picky about details. I'm happy with anything that doesn't actually make my feet bleed :biggrin: !
 

pwincessonice

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 7, 2023
I don't think anyone can get that specific about wiggle room. I'd say you shouldn't be able to lift your toes up so that their undersides come right off the boot "floor", nor should you be able to grip with your toes so that the ball of your foot lifts off. If you're only feeling a very slight difference between the two, then base your decision on other fit factors than just the toes. Walk around in the boots, hop, squat, hold onto something so you can lean as if on the inside or outside edge if there was a blade attached. See which boot feels more comfortable all over.

I used to wear Jacksons until they changed the last and it no longer suited my foot. The whole boot was heated, and then I put them on and went through the motions I just described, with a bit more emphasis on jumping straight up from a deep knee bend because I'm a pairs skater. I need a lot of spring in my skates for lifts and throws. But I worked the warm boots for ten to twenty minutes and then gave them back to the technician for blade fitting and they were always fine after that. I started skating in the era when boots didn't have padded linings and there was no such thing as heat molding. You went through agony with a new pair for weeks with blisters, bleeding, and other torments until you had them softened up enough inside. Maybe the newer generations of boots are so much better I'm just grateful to leave that breaking-in torture behind and am not inclined to be picky about details. I'm happy with anything that doesn't actually make my feet bleed :biggrin: !
Not even lifting a little bit on the ball of my foot? In Risport I can't lift the ball of my foot at all; in Jackson I can lift a little, just slightly lifting but obvious enough (even though way better than my current skates). But I believe there is a padding foam workaround for this issue, right? Will a thicker socks work instead of paddings?
 

Diana Delafield

Frequent flyer
Final Flight
Joined
Oct 22, 2022
Country
Canada
Not even lifting a little bit on the ball of my foot? In Risport I can't lift the ball of my foot at all; in Jackson I can lift a little, just slightly lifting but obvious enough (even though way better than my current skates). But I believe there is a padding foam workaround for this issue, right? Will a thicker socks work instead of paddings?
OK, I've lost you here. You want the ball of your foot to stay snugly within the boot all around, with no room to move up and down (or sideways). I think you need to talk to the fitter to clarify, but if the toe box is a smidge too deep, then the foam goes on top of your toes to fill that upper gap. Heavy socks would wrap your foot all the way around and you'd have to wear the same or duplicate socks every time to get the same feel of where your foot was in the boot. In a padded boot, adding more padding of heavy socks would give you hot, muffled feet and you'd lose the feel of connection to the ice. Even with blades between your boot sole and the ice you should still feel "grounded". Attached to the ice as if you were dancing barefoot on a floor, not sort of skidding around on top of a slippery surface.

But that's a whole different issue, getting into the whole-body physical sensation of skating, and one best raised with your coach. You've found a good fitter, from what I've heard of the place, and you should make sure they understand that you're still a little concerned about the fit of a boot's toe box and need extra attention paid to that area. Good luck!
 

pwincessonice

Rinkside
Joined
Dec 7, 2023
OK, I've lost you here. You want the ball of your foot to stay snugly within the boot all around, with no room to move up and down (or sideways). I think you need to talk to the fitter to clarify, but if the toe box is a smidge too deep, then the foam goes on top of your toes to fill that upper gap. Heavy socks would wrap your foot all the way around and you'd have to wear the same or duplicate socks every time to get the same feel of where your foot was in the boot. In a padded boot, adding more padding of heavy socks would give you hot, muffled feet and you'd lose the feel of connection to the ice. Even with blades between your boot sole and the ice you should still feel "grounded". Attached to the ice as if you were dancing barefoot on a floor, not sort of skidding around on top of a slippery surface.

But that's a whole different issue, getting into the whole-body physical sensation of skating, and one best raised with your coach. You've found a good fitter, from what I've heard of the place, and you should make sure they understand that you're still a little concerned about the fit of a boot's toe box and need extra attention paid to that area. Good luck!
I'll talk to the fitter and see what can be done. Thank you so much for your help!
 

tstop4me

Final Flight
Joined
Oct 2, 2015
Country
United-States
All Jacksons are heat moldable at the toebox area, yes?
All Jackson boots that are specifically listed as "heat moldable" are heat moldable in the toebox area (and elsewhere). This includes all Jackson boots that are sold separately (without a blade) as well as higher-end kit boots (sold pre-mounted with a blade). Lower-end kit boots are not heat moldable. From your various posts, I believe you are considering separate boots only; so you should be OK in this regard.
 
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