High fashion awards: Preparation and prediscussion | Page 4 | Golden Skate

High fashion awards: Preparation and prediscussion

labgoat

Working on Costumes contest & REWATCHES
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 3, 2007
Country
United-States
FYI - discussions are progressing for this project. Criteria and categories have been selected and are being tested for suitability. The scope of the contest has been a challenge as this contest spans the years up to the present with an added category of Hall of Fame. Please be patient with us as we finish working out the details. Please note that we will not be naming "winners" to avoid fan wars. Instead nominations for the list with acceptance to the list is going to be the reward - that way skaters get recognized. Stay tuned...more to follow in good time.
 

labgoat

Working on Costumes contest & REWATCHES
Record Breaker
Joined
Jan 3, 2007
Country
United-States
Interesting things I have learned researching this event:
  • In the early days, the primary design goal was to stay warm. Hence jackets, gloves, hats, and heavy sweaters, especially for school figures. Dark colors made one much more visible on the ice.
  • While figures were completed, especially outdoors, skirts became short and small so tracings could easily be seen. Sonja Henie popularized the use of white boots for women at this time as well as short skirts
  • After the world wars, there was a fabric shortage and shorter skirts for freestyle became popular. Barbara Ann Scott also popularized short skirts.
  • Stretch fabrics and the ability to dye them easily and the advent of color television made the interest in exploring colored costumes grow. Peacetime and televised Olympics resulted in an interest in athletics and sportswear influenced designs of the 1970-1980s. Anyone remember Olivia Newton-John singing Let's Get Physical as a music chart topper?
  • The eighties were the years of excess and the more decor, color, beading and elaborate design made for many of the sports most exuberant designs.
  • The nineties became the decade where the excesses of the eighties became more reigned in and skaters began to explore more conservative, classic design - turning to couture and pret-a-porter for inspiration. It was also the decade of designer wear and an symbol of prestige to announce your designer. The Russians turned to a lot of designers from the Bolshoi for inspiration.
  • The 2000s used elaborate construction and a variety of materials and accents to find innovative and daring ways to gain attention. Eveningwear use for the biggest events such as tuxedo and gown like dresses, sheer inserts, spandex, lycra, and more were used to custom their costumes to their music and their routines. International looks became more common with the popularity of the internet.
  • International Skating Union's Rule 500, which states that, "the clothing of the Competitors must be modest, dignified and appropriate for athletic competition — not garish or theatrical in design (see WTFabric contest for example of these). Clothing may, however, reflect the character of the music chosen.
Source: https://www.businessinsider.com/oly...zolkowy-of-germany-used-color-to-stand-out-18
 
Last edited:

TallyT

Record Breaker
Joined
Apr 23, 2018
Country
Australia
Interesting things I have learned researching this event:
  • In the early days, the primary design goal was to stay warm. Hence jackets, gloves, hats, and heavy sweaters, especially for school figures. Dark colors made one much more visible on the ice.
  • While figures were completed, especially outdoors, skirts became short and small so tracings could easily be seen. Sonja Henie popularized the use of white boots for women at this time as well as short skirts
  • After the world wars, there was a fabric shortage and shorter skirts for freestyle became popular. Barbara Ann Scott also popularized short skirts.
  • Stretch fabrics and the ability to dye them easily and the advent of color television made the interest in exploring colored costumes grow. Peacetime and televised Olympics resulted in an interest in athletics and sportswear influenced designs of the 1970-1980s. Anyone remember Olivia Newton-John singing Let's Get Physical as a music chart topper?
  • The eighties were the years of excess and the more decor, color, beading and elaborate design made for many of the sports most exuberant designs.
  • The nineties became the decade where the excesses of the eighties became more reigned in and skaters began to explore more conservative, classic design - turning to couture and pret-a-porter for inspiration. It was also the decade of designer wear and an symbol of prestige to announce your designer. The Russians turned to a lot of designers from the Bolshoi for inspiration.
  • The 2000s used elaborate construction and a variety of materials and accents to find innovative and daring ways to gain attention. Eveningwear use for the biggest events such as tuxedo and gown like dresses, sheer inserts, spandex, lycra, and more were used to custom their costumes to their music and their routines. International looks became more common with the popularity of the internet.
  • International Skating Union's Rule 500, which states that, "the clothing of the Competitors must be modest, dignified and appropriate for athletic competition — not garish or theatrical in design (see WTFabric contest for example of these). Clothing may, however, reflect the character of the music chosen.
Source: https://www.businessinsider.com/oly...zolkowy-of-germany-used-color-to-stand-out-18
While the 90s may have been more restrained than the 80s, there were some real doozies - skaters like Jana Khokhlova quite often looked as if they had spray-painted the costumes on and then peeled off as much as they thought they could get away with :) which I find great fun.
 
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