Article about Mariah Bell (and artistry vs technical prowess) in The Guardian

Amei

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Nov 11, 2013
I don't know that they (the USFSA) are more focused on men; I think it's just that they happen to have an outstanding male skater right now (and a couple of others that audiences enjoy, such as Jason Brown). Not too long ago it seemed like they were "promoting" Ice Dance. No mystery -- they had Davis and White.

They hype-up the disciplines that win and have a chance to medal which is the men's discipline and ice dance. I mean there are times with US TV coverage of figure skating that if you don't follow the sport you would have no idea that the pairs discipline exists. The problem for ladies is that right now there's no one that really step onto a Worlds, Olympic or Grand Prix Final competition and be a threat to win or even podium, last year the expectation was that Tennell was going to finish dead last at the GPF if everyone skated well, she lucked out that Zagitova had a terrible FS and even then Zagitova's reputation still got her a higher PCS score then Tennell (barely but it was higher). Post-2020 break due to COVID Alysa Liu who was the skater that was anticipated to challenge the Russian and Japanese ladies has looked a long way off from her Nationals performance level, meanwhile the Russians and Japanese don't appear to have missed much at all.
 

Smith16

Rinkside
Joined
May 30, 2016
My question then is then who should the US fed be pushing for then? Frankly there isn't a single US lady who has the tech to be competitive internationally or for the podium at least. Mariah struggles with 3-3s, Bradie and Karen underrotate their jumps, Alysa is going through a growth spurt which is affecting her jumps, Amber may have a 3a but she struggles with consistency and none of the other ladies have made an impact on the international scene. So what does the US Fed do?
 

DizzyFrenchie

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My question then is then who should the US fed be pushing for then? Frankly there isn't a single US lady who has the tech to be competitive internationally or for the podium at least. Mariah struggles with 3-3s, Bradie and Karen underrotate their jumps, Alysa is going through a growth spurt which is affecting her jumps, Amber may have a 3a but she struggles with consistency and none of the other ladies have made an impact on the international scene. So what does the US Fed do?
From my European point of view (sorry it's more or less politics) what they lack is a strong background. A good handful of World-calibre skaters in a discipline (such as in Russia or in Japan), comes from a pool of dozens of high-level skaters which comes from a pool of hundreds of excellent skaters etc. At present they have just a handful of high-level skaters, none World-calibre except Nathan Chen and maybe Jason Brown.
In some countries, even leisure skaters who have neither chance nor will to win anything, are somehow subsidised and it is maybe not necessary to get that. In US there's the Learn to Skate program and it is great because it makes discovering figure skating affordable and also a better known process to the general public, but after? What happen to the best little skater in a course at the end of the program, who has proven great potential? Well, either this skater's family have money enough for the many tens of thousands dollars which a proper competitive training will cost them, or he/she will be out for competition (whether continuing leisure skating or simply giving up with regret). There is nothing to retain these promising children who don't have the means to train what it takes to become a champion, no result-based follow-up free, or affordable program, I think? And what about medical care (and billing) in case of injury? (I have no idea as to this, but one can safely bet that every skating champion have had at least one injury.) And nutritional counselling, and physiotherapy, and psychological counselling, when they reach a higher level?
I think supporting such or such national-level champion is less relevant to figure skating in the US than nurturing the best beginners and the most promising intermediate skaters. From the numbers I read about diversity and incomes in the US, it would also address greatly the problem of the under-representation of some population groups in high-level figure skating.
Wishing figure skating to be so popular as to attract tens of thousands kids of wealthy parents (and as many dedicated parents) doesn't seem realistic to me, in addition to maintaining the diversity problem. The one problem to tackle maybe, to get Men and male Pairs and Ice Dance skaters would be addressing American gender stereotypes but I don't wish to enter in this problem there because there is too little room for discussion nowadays.
 

TallyT

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Country
Australia
Quiet, long term investment in attracting, supporting and developing youngsters would be lovely, but without an audience, the USFed may not be willing or able to fund this. They do seem to go for short term hype instead.

I would hazard an outsider's guess that the real question is not so much what are the American PTB not doing that the Japanese and Russians are (they really can't and probably shouldn't try to, although I would suggest looking at why the Japanese ladies, only one of which has what you'd say is a realistic stab at podium at Worlds/Olympics if held, are still so popular with both press and public for their skating itself) but what the PTB are not doing with the ladies that is being done quite a bit better in the men and dance. The latter two may not have the public's regard, but they are still attracting a number of skaters of the calibre to shine on the world stage, and some pretty good ones just below that.

So why aren't the ladies?
 

DizzyFrenchie

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Quiet, long term investment in attracting, supporting and developing youngsters would be lovely, but without an audience, the USFed may not be willing or able to fund this. They do seem to go for short term hype instead.

I would hazard an outsider's guess that the real question is not so much what are the American PTB not doing that the Japanese and Russians are (they really can't and probably shouldn't try to, although I would suggest looking at why the Japanese ladies, only one of which has what you'd say is a realistic stab at podium at Worlds/Olympics if held, are still so popular with both press and public for their skating itself) but what the PTB are not doing with the ladies that is being done quite a bit better in the men and dance. The latter two may not have the public's regard, but they are still attracting a number of skaters of the calibre to shine on the world stage, and some pretty good ones just below that.

So why aren't the ladies?
True that a federation cannot do this from scratch, without financial help.
I think the Japanese Ladies have the high-level ones, and the excellent ones, though "just" Rika Kihira at World level at this very moment.
 

Mathman

Record Breaker
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Jun 21, 2003
So why aren't the ladies?
I don't think there is an answer to this question. Once in a while an outstanding athlete comes along. If it happens to be Nathan Chen, then hurray for U.S. men's skating. If it happens to be Davis and White, then good for Ice Dance. Maybe the next star will be a Lady. (Pairs, I'm not so hopeful abput.)
 
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bonita

Final Flight
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Mar 27, 2018
My question then is then who should the US fed be pushing for then? Frankly there isn't a single US lady who has the tech to be competitive internationally or for the podium at least. Mariah struggles with 3-3s, Bradie and Karen underrotate their jumps, Alysa is going through a growth spurt which is affecting her jumps, Amber may have a 3a but she struggles with consistency and none of the other ladies have made an impact on the international scene. So what does the US Fed do?
That is also my question. Honestly I would like more updates of other skaters like how and what Ting, Hanna, and Audrey are doing instead of a somewhat rehash of other Mariah articles.

But I didn’t see anything wrong with this article. Plus why USFSA promotes Mariah on Guradian rather than US media like USAToday, NYT, WSJ, Washington Post? For Skate America, Mariah was promoted heavily on NBCSports, TeamUSA, which makes better sense. To me it is more a personal opinion of the author than a USFSA promo piece. After all, she won the gold medal at Skate America, silver medal from the Nationals, with Hallelujah considered one of the best performances of the year, along with Schindler’s List from Jason.

Here is the most recent piece about Bradie from fan zone, even though the information was probably from Skate America, as most of the US skating articles are

 
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katymay

Medalist
Joined
Mar 7, 2006
Mariah’s performances last season were amazing. Let’s not forget that she beat Alina’s LP. She’s definitely better than some of the comments on this thread suggest.
That said, her LP this year is terrible and won’t get her anywhere. Bourne is a terrible choreographer based on the work I’ve seen so far this season.
Mariah's long program last year was amazing, and perfect for her skill set. Was not a fan of the short. This year, no matter how she reworks 'ABBA' , it seems like the magic is gone, and the Abba program does nothing for me at all. I find I don't even like watching it. It seems as if she has just copied and pasted much of the program from last year onto the cheezy pop anthems of Abba. If I were her I would go back to last year's long for Worlds. I don't know much about Bourne, but every choreographer has great and not so great efforts.
 

Amei

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Nov 11, 2013
Mariah’s performances last season were amazing. Let’s not forget that she beat Alina’s LP. She’s definitely better than some of the comments on this thread suggest.
That said, her LP this year is terrible and won’t get her anywhere. Bourne is a terrible choreographer based on the work I’ve seen so far this season.

Except she beat Zagitova on the TES (in a competition that had some dubious calls/non-calls, plus let's not sugar-coat that Zagitova didn't perform her best whereas Bell did), not the PCS which the root of the article seems to be that she's an artistic skater vs. a technical marvel.

Mariah’s performances last season were amazing. Let’s not forget that she beat Alina’s LP. She’s definitely better than some of the comments on this thread suggest.
That said, her LP this year is terrible and won’t get her anywhere. Bourne is a terrible choreographer based on the work I’ve seen so far this season.

Bourne's like every other choreographer - she has hits and misses (I agree several of the programs done by her are misses, but this might've been another virtual choreographing session which seems to be a massive failure, there are some things that can be done via Zoom/Skype, etc. I don't think choreographing is 1 of them. Additionally, she was the choreographer of Mariah's FS last year (according to Wikipedia - if it's wrong then oops)
 

TallyT

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Country
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I don't think there is an answer to this question. Once in a while an outstanding athlete comes along. If it happens to be Nathan Chen, then hurray for U.S. men's skating. If it happens to be Davis and White, then good for Ice Dance. Maybe the next star will be a Lady. (Pairs, I'm not so hopeful abput.)
Thing is, to grow the audience and therefore the budding newcomers and the sport's success, once in a while outliers aren't gonna do it.

Unless you are Yuna Kim.

And no one else - anywhere - is Yuna Kim.

Bourne's like every other choreographer - she has hits and misses (I agree several of the programs done by her are misses, but this might've been another virtual choreographing session which seems to be a massive failure, there are some things that can be done via Zoom/Skype, etc. I don't think choreographing is 1 of them. Additionally, she was the choreographer of Mariah's FS last year (according to Wikipedia - if it's wrong then oops)

She appears to be having an off-year, even Yuzuru's free which probably made more FS fans all over the world feel faint than anything by anyone since 2018 is not only a work in choreographic progress, but the truly touch-of-paradise greatness in it, by the sound of things, is his own. And none of her other current clients that I'm aware of are - in my humble opinion - up to doing that. Certainly Bell isn't (though to be fair, I am one of those who don't see her as a particularly artistic skater, which makes the original article even more clickbaity).
 
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DizzyFrenchie

On the Ice
Joined
Dec 9, 2019
(...)


She appears to be having an off-year, even Yuzuru's free which probably made more FS fans all over the world feel faint than anything since 2018 is not only a work in choreographic progress, but the truly touch-of-paradise greatness in it, by the sound of things, is his own. And none of her other current clients that I'm aware of are - in my humble opinion - up to doing that. Certainly Bell isn't (though to be fair, I am one of those who don't see her as a particularly artistic skater, which makes the original article even more clickbaity).


(...)
I wonder, if next season is more or less normal (i.e. allowing her to choreograph in presence, not remotely, which obviously doesn't work very well), if she will fix her client's programs of this year, or imagine new ones (or lose them). Both I suppose, depending on the skaters?
I am under the impression that Mariah Bell will aim to Beijing Olympics. She will have to opt for one of these solutions, and as I am no choreograph at all, I wonder which would be best for her. If she has a spot, of course.
 

Thrashergurl

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Oct 27, 2019
Except she beat Zagitova on the TES (in a competition that had some dubious calls/non-calls, plus let's not sugar-coat that Zagitova didn't perform her best whereas Bell did), not the PCS which the root of the article seems to be that she's an artistic skater vs. a technical marvel.
Bourne's like every other choreographer - she has hits and misses (I agree several of the programs done by her are misses, but this might've been another virtual choreographing session which seems to be a massive failure, there are some things that can be done via Zoom/Skype, etc. I don't think choreographing is 1 of them. Additionally, she was the choreographer of Mariah's FS last year (according to Wikipedia - if it's wrong then oops)
I agree Zagitova didn’t perform well, and it’s well noted her skating was declining throughout the season, where Mariah’s was improving. Zagotiva stated she lacked motivation, and it clearly showed on her skating. But we have to give credit where it is due, and both US ladies were able to beat her. Also, Alina was still being given Olympic champion PCS and many questioned why it was so high in relation to what she had been putting on the ice.
I don’t see why anyone is making a fuss about the US promoting its skaters. Unless something major changes, none of the US ladies have a shot at an Olympic medal. I sure they’re well aware of it, it it doesn’t mean they shouldn’t promote their own skaters.
 

1111bm

Final Flight
Joined
Dec 31, 2016
Bradie is tenacious and edgy a perfect candidate for the Benoit choreography. She finds a way to rotate those jumps through sheer will and has ridiculously fast spins and complicated footwork sequences. Her artistry is improving, but is more cerebral than emotional.

Mariah's skating is emotionally driven with great attention to detail. She too has very good spins and complicated footwork. She does not quite have the tenacity that Bradie does.
What's complicated about the step sequences of Bradie and Mariah? Especially when comparing them to those of other competitors?

I do not mean to pick at these two - many skaters in the US and Canada have this issue as do those who do not develop the ability to move as a marionette either through awareness or ballet or other dance training. You can see the difference in how Nathan, the Japanese and Korean girls and of course the Russian girls have this type of movement - a solid core to build upon.
I would definitly say that both Bradie and Mariah look sort of um, ungainly (?) to me. I mean the way they move and the shape of their arms and legs don't look aesthetically pleasing or harmonious to me. I wouldn't have described it as a 'lacking core' or bad alignment though. Is that something someone with a dance background would be able to spot?

Don't agree about the russians though, because f.i. Evgenia and Alina look the same to me as Bradie and Mariah (in that respect at least).
 

GS Forum Staff

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Hello posters:

Please do not engage in bickering about trolling and about posts from other threads, as those posts derail the conversation and are off-topic. Please take all such conversations about other threads and posters' histories to PM.

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labgoat

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Hello posters:

Please do not engage in bickering about trolling and about posts from other threads, as those posts derail the conversation and are off-topic. Please take all such conversations about other threads and posters' histories to PM.

Thank you!
I will delete my post
 

Mathman

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Jun 21, 2003
What's complicated about the step sequences of Bradie and Mariah? Especially when comparing them to those of other competitors?


I would definitly say that both Bradie and Mariah look sort of um, ungainly (?) to me. I mean the way they move and the shape of their arms and legs don't look aesthetically pleasing or harmonious to me.
T o me, Mariah looks graceful enough in a conventional sort of way. Bradie is angular and long-legged, and I think she has found a performance style that suits her.
 

bonita

Final Flight
Joined
Mar 27, 2018
Except she beat Zagitova on the TES (in a competition that had some dubious calls/non-calls, plus let's not sugar-coat that Zagitova didn't perform her best whereas Bell did), not the PCS which the root of the article seems to be that she's an artistic skater vs. a technical marvel.



Bourne's like every other choreographer - she has hits and misses (I agree several of the programs done by her are misses, but this might've been another virtual choreographing session which seems to be a massive failure, there are some things that can be done via Zoom/Skype, etc. I don't think choreographing is 1 of them. Additionally, she was the choreographer of Mariah's FS last year (according to Wikipedia - if it's wrong then oops)
Virtual choreographing is far from idea, but skaters have to cope with the current situation and do what they have to do. We don't know if things could return to normal when people can travel freely by summer, when most of the skaters would get their new choreography for the Olympic season. Plus, not all virtually choreographed programs are disasters. Both Yuma's programs were done remotely with Lori. Vincent has his SP done with Lori remotely while got his FP in person with Misha. To me this SP from Lori is the best program he has in his senior career. Boyang's SP was done virtually with Shae while the FP was done virtually with Lori. Yuma's case is very impressive given that this is his first time working with Lori, and he didn't settle on his FP until the beginning of November. He previously tried two new FP for this season, with one choreographed by one of his coaches Misao Sato. It must be they really like what Lori has done for Yuma's SP that they ditched the previous new program at such a late time, and it is Misao Sato strongly recommended Yuma to work with Lori, even helped him recording his moves around 2:00 or 3:00 AM Japan time in order to work with Lori.

Shae-Lynn choreographed Mariah's free for the past 3 seasons. I would wait until Nationals to see what the final product is. The last outing of this program was around Christmas time, by then Dancing Queen has already been removed from the choreo. The first half of the season is always work in progress, with programs constantly being tweaked after all getting the feedbacks. In the past before Shae-Lynn relocated to California, she would fly to Raf's rink to work on programs with his skaters. To be on the Olympic team is Mariah's goal, and it is Adam's strategy for Mariah to try different things out of her comfort zone before the Olympic season, doing that would help her to feel much easier/comfortable when they finally settle on something works best her during the Olympic season. Mariah actually rejected the ABBA program in the beginning, only one day suddenly realized it she kind of like it when she on the ice. So I would rather think this is more an experiment she is doing with Shae-Lynn, with the hope to find the ultimate program for the Olympic season.

You can find more information about the music/program choice in this August article
CEO Of Her Career, Mariah Bell Explains Her Mentality and the New Programs She Hopes Lead to Even More Success - U.S. Figure Skating Fan Zone
 
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bonita

Final Flight
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Mar 27, 2018
I think that the problem is not so much tech versus artistry as it is with defining what "exceptional artistry" ought to mean in the first place. It is obvious what exceptional tech means. It means Nathan Chen doing 6 quads.

Of course doing 6 quads is exceptional tech because only him can do it (Yuzuru Hanyu seeming to have decided to skip 4F to focus on 4A, and having less-than-ideal training conditions at the moment, preventing him from being "top").
But his competitive programs are so much lacking tech on all aspects but jumps, tough exceptional, it can also be called very unbalanced and partial.
Tech-wise, he would not be able to skate, not only Yuzuru Hanyu's programs, quads replaced by triples, these are really too "exceptional tech" — even his programs from when he was younger than Nathan Chen (because when comparing them, we tend to forget the latter is more than four years younger) and was still inferior to Patrick Chan in skating skills (he overcame it in 2016-2017, so, older than Nathan Chen's present age); or Jason Brown, who's Yuzuru Hanyu's age; but to Roman Sadovsky's or Jun Hwan Cha's, for instance, the latter being the same age as Nathan Chen, because he doesn't seem to be able to endanger his balance, either in step sequences or in spins for instance, as they do, and as in fact all other top Men skaters do. Also, his jumping with such long entries is a tech fault, his stiffness in jumps landings too (when I see what is written, and what Yuzuru Hanyu himself said, of his landings in Let Me Entertain You, still so much softer than Nathan Chen's!) He also tends to keep a medium speed, and indeed I don't see how one could land so many quads without, but tech-wise, he's lacking steep accelerations and decelerations. I don't think he would have the stamina either for a Yuzuru Hanyu program, even without quad, because they are so taxing. On the same ground, Nathan Chen doesn't manage to make his moves look effortless, which is a technical ability as well as an artistical one. (I know I'm missing some.)
He's obviously exceptional element base value-wise (and indeed real core of jumps-wise), but this is far from being all tech, and he's "exceptionally" (for a top skater!) deficient in all other tech matters.
I don't see such enormous differences among Ladies. If you take the "quad queen" for instance, Alexandra Trusova, she has not only quads, she has difficult entries and transitions, she shows very good skating skills, spins, flow... Of course all this lower the probability of landing her quads successfully, but she's 16 and I have great hopes that she gets technically close to Yuzuru Hanyu some day, or who knows, better? She's on the way. (We cannot compare with his level at her age because boys tend to grow later than girls.) and other Russian "quadsters" (or "nearly") are rather better than her on these tech aspects, though not dramatically.
What Mathman stated is a fact, Nathan attempted 6 quad in his Olympic free and Worlds 2018 free program. Training six quas program is very very hard both mentally and physically, according to Nathan when replying to a question from young skater last summer. It is an incredible achievement no matter how some FS fans like it or not.

Claiming Nathan cannot do someone's program is an assumption, which is, not a fact/reality, it is a hypothesis. You can lend it more credibility by supplying numbers, details to prove the point. Without convincing details, it is just some idea living in some people's minds. By the same token, would Yuzuru be able to do what Nathan did when he was 17, like what he did at 4cc 2017? If the answer is yes, then you bear the burden of proof. I am not going to making any assumption for this question.

" Also, his jumping with such long entries is a tech fault, his stiffness in jumps landings too"
"He also tends to keep a medium speed, and indeed I don't see how one could land so many quads without, but tech-wise, he's lacking steep accelerations and decelerations. I don't think he would have the stamina either for a Yuzuru Hanyu program, even without quad, because they are so taxing."

Here are the videos from 2019 GPF. Please educate me on
1. how much faster Yuzu was in this performance? How much slower Nathan compared to other top skaters with similar tech content of 4 quad, I am not asking for 5 quad, not asking for programs with 4lz and 4f.
2. how stiff/rough Nathan's landings are compared with those of Yuzu's
3. how much shorter his entries to his jumps compared to Nathan. Nathan did have long entries to his 3A in this program, compared to his other program since there were originally steps leading to the 3A and the 3A needed and indeed landed right on the beat.
4. How many more difficult entries he tried than what Nathan did for his 4lz and 4t-eu-3s combo, ie. entry from choctaw, exit from spread eagle for the 4lz, spread eagle to the 4t-eu-3S combo.

This is Yuzu's GPF free
Here is Nathan's free
or you can watch Yuzuru fan's breakdown about Nathan's fp

"but to Roman Sadovsky's or Jun Hwan Cha's, for instance, the latter being the same age as Nathan Chen, because he doesn't seem to be able to endanger his balance, either in step sequences or in spins for instance, as they do, and as in fact all other top Men skaters do."
"But his competitive programs are so much lacking tech on all aspects but jumps, tough exceptional, it can also be called very unbalanced and partial."


Roman does have incredible spins, while spin is not Nathan's favorite elements. But does Yuzu has better or similar spins like those of Jason, Misha or Roman? If he doesn't, does it mean Yuzu is a bad with his spins, I wouldn't draw that conclusion.

Here is FS from 2017 when Nathan was 18, when he did sometimes have stiff knees, rough landings and didn't have the speed he has today, but educate me how lacking/unbalanced his program was compared to the programs of Roman and Cha

Cha's FS from 4cc 2020, similar age as 18 year old Nathan

Here is Nathan's SP
SP from Cha

And enlighten me how much shorter his entries to jumps compared to Nathan, how much faster they are compared to Nathan.

he's "exceptionally" (for a top skater!) deficient in all other tech matters.
I am too uninformed and "narrowly focused" in this regard to find some striking difference, so without you educating me how Nathan's program should be, I would agree with Kamila Valieva's take that Nathan is good in both jump and skating and he does it effortlessly

And your girl Sasha would probably would not agree with your opinion. To Sasha Nathan would always teach something new and complicate his program.

And I don't think younger Japanese skaters hold the same opinions about good programs, good performances as you do. To Yuma, Shun, and Kao who went to watch the Saitama Worlds, "there is none other than Nathan", BTW, they thought Jason's short was very good too.

To Yuma in Nov. 2019, "Nathan is very good at using his body. He moves his upper body so smoothly, gracefully." He stated further he tried to learn from Nathan, "the way he uses his feet; I think everything, right from the joint of his finger, is a performance in figure skating. So I tried to watch and learn with that understanding that is the level of detail I need to achieve.


In an interview after his NHK win, he offered further opinions about Nathan, he specifically mentioned Nathan's spins, steps and expressiveness, and his desire to be all around like Nathan is.

2020NHK杯 鍵山選手インタビュー | KOSE SPORTS BEAUTY NEWS Powered by Ameba (ameblo.jp)

It seemed that his fellow young Russian skater, the very promising Andrei Mozalev whose idol is Nathan shares similar thoughts,
"What impresses you about Nathan?
"Chen is cool with his jumping technique, his artistry."
Фигурист Андрей Мозалев - интервью о четверных, книгах, Нейтане Чене (sport24.ru)

There are too many other top skaters enjoying Nathan's programs, this post is getting too long, and I've other stuff to do so I just stop here.

There are many areas Nathan needs improvement in. Both Nathan and Raf are aware of those, and making conscious efforts in improving his skating. Constructive criticism are always welcome to Nathan and his fans. But claiming him he's "exceptionally" (for a top skater!) deficient in all other tech matters" and his programs are "partial" without offering further details is not constructive criticism.
 
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1111bm

Final Flight
Joined
Dec 31, 2016
T o me, Mariah looks graceful enough in a conventional sort of way. Bradie is angular and long-legged, and I think she has found a performance style that suits her.

I honestly don't find them that different looking.
I'm not sure if Bradie is 'inherently' angular in the way she moves or if that isn't just Benoit's choreo of the past seasons?

Same with Mariah, I think she chooses programs that have a graceful style and choreography, so it appears as if she's moving differently than Bradie. But I don't actually find the quality of her movements and her execution of the choreo particularly graceful or elegant.
 
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Apple1078

On the Ice
Joined
Mar 6, 2020
Mariah's long program last year was amazing, and perfect for her skill set. Was not a fan of the short. This year, no matter how she reworks 'ABBA' , it seems like the magic is gone, and the Abba program does nothing for me at all. I find I don't even like watching it. It seems as if she has just copied and pasted much of the program from last year onto the cheezy pop anthems of Abba. If I were her I would go back to last year's long for Worlds. I don't know much about Bourne, but every choreographer has great and not so great efforts.
I actually also enjoyed her Ludovico Einaudi FS from 2019.
 
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